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Full text of "San Francisco News Letter (July-Dec. 1908)"

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Q EDO? 1202233 Y. 

California Stale Library 



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Accession No. 
Call No. 



146725 



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THE SOCIAL RESUME OF THE WEEK THE HYPOCRITICAL DAILY PRESS AND THE RACE TRACKS 

THE FINANCIAL NEWS OF THE WEEK COLLUSION TO GRAFT THE CITY MUST BE STOPPED 



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(!Mitomfmftfce*t% %zx. 



Price 10 Geitt 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL, SATURDAY, JULY 4, 1! 



$4 per Year 



. H I M lllllllllli|!!giillllllillllll llPgll lll m \ 

TOOTH POWDER. 

Perfection in Dentifrices 

Sixty years experience in the largest and 
best equipped dentifrice plant in the world 
under the ever watchful eye of experts and 
blended by machinery of latest design, the 
choicest ingredients are transformed into the 
world renowned Sozodont, preparations, in 
three forms: 

Liquid, Powder, Paste 

No particle of grit. No taint of acid. 

Their healthful fragrance penetrates the 
minutest crevices of the teeth, giving the deli- 
cious sensation of perfect cleanliness to the 
whole mouth structure for hours after use. 

HALL CSb RUCKEL. New York City 




EHRMAN BROS. & GO. Distributors 

Phone Kearny 3873 134-136-138 Front Street, San Francisco 



THE 
SECRET 

Of Good Cooking 
1$ Heat. Regulation 

A Gas Range 
Gives Perfect. Control 
of the Fire 

OAKLAND GAS. LIGHT and 
HEAT COMPANY 

CLAY AND THIRTEENTH STREETS 



LARGEST DYEING AND GLEANING WORKS ON THE PACIFIC COAST 

KST1B. 181)3 INC. 1888 
CAPITAL STOCK il&O.OOO 

MODERN PLANT 
UP-TO-DATE METHODS 
FINE WORK 
QUICK DELIVERY 

Phone Market 1620 

Private exchange con- 
necting all department a 

21 to 27 to 43 TENTH ST., between Market i»d Mission, Sao FrencUco. 
Branches: 1348 Van Ness Arena* 1164 Broadway, 

1158 McAllister Street Oakland 

Renovatory Department Agencies 




1346 to 1362 Mission Street 



In every town 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 
Paper 

1400 to 1450 Fourth St., San Francisco. Telephone Market SOU. 
Private Exchange Connecting all Departments. 



UNION LUMBER COMPANY 

REDWOOD AND PINE LUMBER. 
Redwood Ties, Telegraph Poles, Shingles, Split Shakes, Etc. 

Main Office — Monadnock Bldg., San Francisco. 
Yards and Planing Mills — Sixth and Channel Sts., San Francisco. 



City Index and Purchasers'Guide 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 

Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public, 2004 Sutter street, corner Fillmore 
street. All legal papers drawn up accurately. Phone West 3016. 

INVALID CHAIRS. 

Sold, rented, exchanged; manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair. 180R 
Market street, near Octavia. Telephone Fell 9911.. 



TO LET 

IN ALAMEDA 

FURNISHED COTTAGE 



7 rooms, large garden, bath and laundry. 
Apply 2251 Clinton Avenue, between Oak 
and Walnut Sts. 3 blocks from Park St. Station. 



nnilPlirO Back to our old location 623 SACRAMENTO 
DliUonLO STREET between Kearny and Montgomery 

With full line of Brushes. Brooms and Feather Dusters, on hand and made to 
order. Janitor Supplies of all kinds. Ladders, Buckets. Chamois, Metal Polish 
and Cleaning Powders. Hardware, Wood and Willow Ware. 
Call, Write or Telephone Kearny 5787 

WM. BUCHANAN 



Dr. G. F. Nevius, Dentist* 



Formerly of James Flood Building, 814 Eddy 
Street, San Francisco. 



W. A. BRYANT, M. D., D. D. S. 

Surgery of tbe Head and Neck 



Consultation Hours 

10 a. m. to 1 p. m. 
6 to 8 p. m. 



2941 WASHINGTON ST. 
Telephone West 1039 



H. Alfred Anderson, Painter 

Painting, Decorating, Tinting, Papering, 
Wood Finishing, Gilding, Varnishing, Stain- 
ing. 1014 Fillmore Street. Phone Park 823 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Sierra Nevada Mining Company. 
Location of principal place of business, San Francisco. California. Lo- 
cation of works, Virginia Alining District. Storey County, State of Nevada. 
Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, 
held on the 8th day of June, 1908. an assessment (No. 14) of ten (10) 
cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable Immediately In United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, Room 116, No. 339 Bush street. San Francisco. 
California. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 14TH DAY OF JULY. 1908. 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the 4th day of 
August, 1908, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost of 
advertising and expenses of sale. 
By order of the Board of Directors. 

WILLIAM McPHERSON. Secretarv. 
Office— Room 116, No. 339 Bush street, San Francisco, California." 



Goodyear Rubber Company 

R. H. PEASE, President 

"COLD SEAL" Rubber Good. 

573-579 Market. Street,, near Second 



Samuel M. Shortridge 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

CHRONICLE BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO 

Tel. Douglas 2176 





(Halif tfrmOlcrtojetix %zx. 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 
The News Letter Is a member California Periodical Publishers' Association. 



VOL. LXXVI 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 4, 1908 



No. 1 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER Is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 773 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Temporary 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal,, Post-offlce as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London office — 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and _ financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication in 
the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 

Heney should not quarrel with fate. He should simply 

change Ins job. 

San Francisco should give the fleet a splendid send-off 

on ils departure. 

The graft prosecution is trying to find out what profit 

there is in being cunning. 

Thief reflects that there is not much use in conviction of 

sin if you cannot quit it. 

Taft and Sherman tip the Bcales ai 500 pounds. Wonder 

if the Democratic nominations will make this a Eai man's rac i 

'Hie sucjden conversion of the Bulletin to the idea of 

abolishing the track is almost a miracle. The editor has stopped 
taking (lie gold euro. 

Another lot of people Irving to navigate the air came to 

grief lasl Sunday. Better leave the hot air husino<- to the pro- 
fessionals anil Hie newspapers. 

The race-track musi go. The Bulletin, afraid to with its 

racing Eriend, has rushed to cover and stabs its erstwhili patron 

in tin' hark. Tin's is so ( 'rotltori-h ! 

Should the News Letter ■ the Call in 

line against Hie tracks, it will feel as if there really was 
tiling respectable in the railing of a handicap artist. 

Srlnnilz probably believes that if nobody woiv afraid no- 
bod] would behave, There was no fear displayed al the banquet 
table when he sat with Collins ami thi 

\ ill ci l thieves! 

Four Justices of 11"' Si • Court are to retire in the 

next Four years on account of tge. The new President will have 
the selection of their suc< — ire. Lei us be careful in sel 
the President. 

The Democratic convent on, H is hoped, will make no 

mistake ami nominate a man who will as worthily ' 

party as Taft represents the Republicans, It is not Mr 
we have in mind at all. 

— —The American flag i- 181 years old. There are but few 
things mundane that have reached this age, ami kept t' 

ability. Witness the ("'all. I fifty, but 

reaped while it s eens. 

Langdon's bovine temperament to him, for 

then lie is not longing for things he cannot have. And 

ive i 'al'h'u i in. Thus 

and the others are playing hell with his ofl 

David Bennett 11 en, and will not 

the Democratic Convention as the harbinj 
bald-headed sae.o of the Empin - 
year.- to the development oi a ha' _ 

The pin-head Eastern preas is rejoi 

ippines mention 

Philippines 

.riff and lhe\ will pp 



In Hie East, the price of beef lias been raised again. Mean- 
while the man who raises 'ho cattle and sells on the hoof is get- 
ting lower prices lor his product than he did before the Spanish 
war. and the retail butcher gets no larger profit than al any time 
in the last ten years. 

There is a specieB of hu i parasite from whom wr shall 

probably never ho rid before the millenium. This is he. or she. 
who lias cultivated our acquaintance to that degree of ripeness 

which tolerates a social call ai or about meal time, when an in- 
vitation to the meal is both right and unavoidable. When this 
event occurs occasionally, we do not notice it. lint when it he- 
comes a confirmed habit, it is difficult to escape the conclusion 
that, it is premeditated. There is no doubl that many bachelors, 

of both sexes, study by this mean- to save the few shekels that 

they would otherwise have to pay al a restaurant. 

One derrick, a Chicago "professor" in the s e univer- 

sitj that pointed with pride at free Love Twiggs, asserts 

that Hie American | pic are no better than the peasantry with 

whom ilio\ ueic classed by Mrs. Humphrey Ward, because 1 1 o "■ 
have no "ancestry." That's a mighty dangerous proposition for 
one Herrick. I'll wager 'he plumed casque of my most ancient 
Roman pro ; linst the heirlooms "1 all the 

hat ever boasted of their "lineage," that if we trace 

the Herrick ancestry close to the roots of the "fi tj tree," we 

-hall find many a Herrick dangling from the hover branches in 
i \piai io hereditary habit ng. Than 

of n- would rather forget our ancestors than lie about 
them, and even a Herrick would better cease rattling the drj 

- own than lie compelled to hold his nose in 
at the unsanitary odor of them. 

The horny-toiiL i or Council 

denounced the Fire < lomm i - I official bo 

(orbitanl union rale- for work and material fur- 
hv "home indu pestiferous demagog 

nized labor" ha y I n merelj ly the 

drubbings they have the hands of citizen- and tax- 

payers 9 lad tired of the tyranny 

uv md i ins of predatory pov- 

erty. ETapp pays the • 

immunity has finally 
ield io the demands 

.eminent • inions, and 

I 
- 

Mr. a man a 

. ; 

- - 

■ 

mut- 

when 

- 

Truly. Ml; 
ohor. 




In Pdlpit ami 
Police Coubt. 



Although Mr. Francis J. Heney no 
longer revels in the adulation of the 
mob, and is denied front-page head- 
lines in the daily press, he is still 
able to find plenty of opportunity for that self-exploitation which 
his soul loveth, if necessarily on a minor scale. Recently he has 
beeji dividing his precious time (all of it, if Mr. Heney is to be 
believed, given without money and without price) between the 
police court and the pulpit. In police court practice the great 
prosecutor seems at last to have found his true level. His easy, 
border-ruffian swagger is more appropriate here than in the 
higher courts, and he can talk with louder voice than any other 
member of the San Francisco bar, which appears to be an asset 
in such practice. Moreover, whenever the opportunity permits, 
Heney can fling bloodthirsty challenges and coarse epithets at a 
defendant and his counsel with a freedom denied him elsewhere. 
In fact, Mr. Heney has proved himself far more at home in the 
police court than in any other department of justice. It is, at 
least, a demonstration of remarkable versatility on Mr. Hene/s 
part that he is also rapidly gaining a reputation for himself as a 
pulpit orator. Denied at present a star employment in the 
metropolis, he is playing "one night stands in the provinces.'' 
If such is somewhat of a declension for the great prosecutor, 
any audience and any notoriety are better than none at all, for 
the insatiable Heney appetite. Unusual distinction was given 
him last week in an invitation in address the State Convention 
of the Christian Endeavo-- Society at Sacramento. Apparently 
the guiding spirits of this admirable association regard Francis 
.T. Heney as an embodiment of all the Christian virtues, and 
congratulated themselves mi being able to secure such an attrac- 
tion for the edification of their young people. Presumably the 
managers of the Christian Endeavor Society are not familiar 
with Mr. IT«-in-\ "- record or character. The braggart, the reck- 
less assassin of character, the man whose public pledges have 
proved unworthy of credence, the detainer of the courts, whose 
duty it has been to rebuke and correct him, the man who cannot 
control his own ugly passions, is hardly a fit person to be held 
up to the youth of the State as the idea of manly virtue and 
Christian endeavor. 



Perhaps to divert public attention 
Tilting at Minob Evils, from the poo] rooms, the gambling 

hells of all sorts and kind?, and the 
unprecedented license which prevails on the Barbary Coast. Chief 
of Police Biggy has initiated crusades against speeding automo- 
biles and nickel-in-the-slot machines. Both admittedly are evils 
and menaces to an ideal community, but they are small matters 
in comparison with the glaring, startling fact that under the 
present purified reform city Government, San Francisco is more 
a "wide-open town" than at any time in the last twenty years. 
Chief Biggy's personal integrity is as unquestionable as thai of 
any of the Good Government Supervisors. But, unfortunately, 
honesty of personal character is not the only qualification neces- 
sary to fit men to administer civic affairs. The Phelanized 
Board of Supervisors apparently believe that their main dutj n 
office is to block and harass the public service corporations, and 
imagine that in carrying out the Phelan-Spreckels policies thej 
can do no wrong. Similarly, Chief of Police Biggy seems to be 

obsessed with the vision of minor considerations when mud e 

important matters are staring him in the face. No San Fran- 
ciscan can point with pride to the horse cars on lower Market 
street, or to the sights of the Barbary Coast as model results of 
reform city government. 



The most careful and thorough, the 
Painful Truth. least prejudiced and partisan, re- 

view of the two years' history of the 
Spreckels Prosecution, has been published in Harper's Weekly. 
The writer, William Inglis, based his conclusions on six weeks' 
patient investigation of events and condition-, measuring every 
angle and listening to every side of the controversy. Moreover, 
Mr. Inglis had the advantage of bringing a fresh and unbiased 
mind to a study of the struggle, and Inure could command a 

better perspective than those who have 1 n in its midst. It 

was not to be expected that the leader? of the Spreckels Prosecu- 
tion would be pleased with such dispassionate summing up of 
their errors and examination of their motives. Mr. Heney, with 
that ready judgment and terse condemnation of every one that 
does not hail him as a hero, calls the article? in Harper's Weekly 
''lie?.'' Those who have had opportunity to know the Heney 
standard of veracity can only conclude that there must be a very 
comfortable stamp of truth to them. 



Dunne's Unique 
Qualifications. 



Judge Frank II. Dunne certainly 
will have a unique record behind 
him on which to base his appeal to 
the people for re-election. If lend- 
ing a ready ear to the murmurs of the mob, if display of per- 
sonal passion, surrender of public authority to the direction of 
a private prosecutor, insolent criticism and blackguard rebukes 
of the higher courts are to be accepted as qualifications for the 
San Francisco judiciary. Frank H. Dunne's re-election next Fall 
should be assured by an overwhelming majority. 



There are some people and some 
Twins in Tortuosity. newspapers in whom the hortatory 

style of discourse seems to be inher- 
ent. In every word of their effusions, the inference i? plain 
that they are not as others. From a self-reared pedestal of 
superiority they write down to the struggling multitude, and 
endeavor to enlighten them. Of such are the Morning Gall and 
the Evening Vealery. 

Concerning every question of public welfare, these grotesque 
twins issue pronunciamentos. and then flatly intimate that any 
who may differ from them are either grafters or fools. But the 
pronunciamentos have lately been issued too often. The mask 
has been raised, and the public has been educated to the fact 
that the moral owners of these papers are but as other men. 
seeking first the kingdom of self and its emoluments. Moreover, 
"Methinks the lady doth protest too much." The exhortations 
of these papers have been too strenuous to be sustained, too loud 
to ring genuine, and too abusive to be disinterested. The phari- 
saic thunderbolts which have been launched for lo ! these many 
months have been found to be harmless, and the public recognizes 
that abuse is the refuge of the defeated controversialist 



Present day commerce is based upon 
Economy to Build Now. the idea of specialization. On- 

raises produce, another builds 
houses, another makes clothes; others engage in transportation 
various commodities; still others work in factories, shops, foun- 
dries and mills. The men who build houses cannot consume all 
the potatoes raised by the fanners. The farmers cannot give all 
the carpenters, masons and plasterers Bteady employment. When 
the artisans are out of employment they oannol secure the 
of purchasing for their requirements, and the result i? a lighter 
demand all along the line. Start one Faction to work and you 
start them all. 



July 4, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



M ITERIAL Low ; 

Labor Plentiful. 



When the call i'or carpenters is 
greater than the supply, men un- 
skilled in the work can secure em- 
ployment at high wages, and skilled 
irkers can command special prices. Here enters and becomes 
active the law of supplj and demand, which may not be reversed 
or defied with impunity. 

When the supply of labor is greater than the demand, work- 
men can be secured on Letter terms and will give greater and 
better service. This is the logic of the law mentioned and of 
human nature. 

Labor is cheaper now than it was a year ago, although nomi- 
nally wages are the same. It is cheaper because it is better. 

Materials are cheaper than they were a year ago, not for the 
same reason that labor is cheaper, but in the actual prices that 
must be paid. 



Build Now/ 



Last year the majority of the dealers 
Material Men in building material had all the 

Want Trade. trade they could handle. This year 

business has been fair, as shown by 
the building records, but there is room for a very considerable 
improvement. 

The one great reason why building operations should be un- 
dertaken now or why contracts for supplies should be entered into 
is that they can be made on more advantageous terms. 

Materials can be secured for lower prices, will be delivered 
more promptly and in a more satisfactory manner than during 
either 1906 or 1907. 



Percentage of 


1908 


decrease 


•$911 


29.0 


313 


46.8 


500 


21.9 


570 


22.0 


400 


84.fi 



As a general proposition, lumber 
Lumber Less than now is being sold for 10 to 15 per 

Last Year. cent less than during last year. In 

some cases, where the trade is sup- 
plied with special woods, a reduction to that extent has nol been 
made. However, 10 per ceni probably represents about the gen- 
eral decline in the retail price of building material. 

A Cleveland operator has supplied some specific information 
showing the relative cost of building in 1907 and 1908, which 
is reproduced herewith: 



L907 

Masonry ami grading $1329 

Plastering 585 

Plumbing 640 

Heating 730 

Painting 530 

Lumber, $4 to $6 a thousand less, 



The foregoing comparative values represent actual figures se- 
cured by a gentleman who wished to build. The L9(M prices 
were made during the latter part of that year and thi 
prices this month. 

It is high time the general public informs itself of this con- 
dition of affairs and profits hy the opportunity now pre- 
mie which probably will not long be available. 

No uniform reduction in the retail prices of lumber has been 
made by the dealers of the country. Some have very materially 
reduced their prices and claim to have encouraged building hy 
this policy. In oi us. however, cheap lumber now being 

offered has to be transported such great distances that the freight 
rates put a high value on the products. This particularly is 
true throughout the Eastern section of the country, and to a 
limited extent in the northern territory, where local sup- 
plies are inadequate. 

rring again to the comparative schedule of values sub- 
mitted it will be seen that the total cost in 1907 would have been 
. for the items mentioned. For 1908 the bids put in rep- 
27, a sa vim : on the building 

for which prices were secured, representing a decrease of 28.5 per 
cent. This reduction possibly may bo out of the ordinary. [I 
ile that building could be done for a third less 
now than in 1907. but the figures given represent estimates made 
by contractors during the two periods. 

This showing is sufficiently strong to warrant every prospective 
builder or I who is in a position to build in tak; 

r up and making a thorough in- i of the subject. 



Conditions in different parts of the 
country vary. What is said of one 
town may not be applicable to an- 
other, and probably would not be applicable to all the country, 
but in every city and every village in the United States it is a 
comparatively easy mattej to determine the relative cost this 
year and last, and beyond question it will be found that build- 
ings can be put up this year at a saving of anywhere from 10 to 
25 per cent of the cost in 1907. 

Pre-eminently, emphatically and conclusively, this is the time 
to build. 



Watterson seems unjustifiably exer- 
Who is Pawning? cised over the suggestion that Ger- 

many is fawning on the United 
States, and he asks if the insinuation contained in an article by 
one Dr. Urban have a firm foundation. It is not plain that the 
Kaiser's smile is pointed this way. Here they have been more or 
less insinuations that Roosevelt was fawning on Germany. 

Now, if there is any fawning, who is doing it? And why? 
And upon whom? Prom the earnestness with which Urban 
protests against the alleged flattery of Germany and the vehe- 
mence with which the critical Americans protest against the p"ro- 
German flirtations of Roosevelt, it may be inferred that the ques- 
tions are not only interesting, but momentous. 

Urban plunges into the political, social and economical, not 
to omit the sentimental, influences involved. Estimating that 
there are about three million poisons of German blood in the 
United States, and arguing therefrom that there must be many 
ties of friendship between the two countries, Urban avers that 
there is no such thing as a German-American; that, the German 
in the United States is first an Amen, an, and then a sympathizer 
with the Fatherland. 



The verdict of the jury in the 

The Bartnett Trial. trial of the ease of Mr. Bartnett, 
was the result of local conditions 
rather than of any testimony which was given in the case. Mr. 
Bartnett's attorneys state that there is mm h reversible error in 
lie record, and they are confident that they will reverse the case 
and obtain a new trial. 

Mr. Bartnett was accused of aiding and abetting the embez- 
zlement of the Colton securities, yet Mr. J. Dalzell Brown, the 
State's witness, testifying under an immunity contract, stated 
that before his alleged conversation with Mr. Bartnett. he had 
sold a part of the I nrities, and "had arranged to sell tin' 

others," and that be would have sold them to keep the bank 
open "had Bartnett been in Asia." Mr. Bartnett denied that any 
such conversation occurred. It is difficult to see how Mr. Bart- 
nett could have aided or abetted a crime committed under such 
circumstances. 

Mr. Bartnett testified that he knew nothing of the sale of 
the Colton securities until after his return from New York in 
November. 1907. 

eeution on the trial admitted that Mr. Bartnett 
neither directly or indirect! I any of the proceeds of the 

sale. 

The jury recommended Mr. Bartnetl to the mercy of the 

court, and evidently baaed 'heir verdict on the theory that some- 
■ lould ho punished for the failure of the bank — not be- 
cause they believed that Mr-. Bartnett had embezzled, or had 
aided or abetted H mbezzlement of the Colton ■ 



It i~ r» Laugh. 



The Bulletin of this city has an- 
nounced that it is opposed to the 

track. It denounces not only 
the track, but its own but the handicap 

artists, the make - rod all 

who have anything to do with the nefarious hoodwinking of the 

public and the swindling of the | r dupes who play the race 

_ ime. 



lUgh and uproariously, and 

O! 1.\-la-L\-i.\-h ! bonoua 

eachinari" - d to a 

laugh and a snoor. for wo have preached this preachment for 

han eight -uddenlv. he Bullet:! 

mavhap la' ro our 

■: ills! The Bulletin will probably 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 4, 1908. 



disclaim that we have any right to laugh, anil to point the finger 
at the two moral lepers. Crotbers and Older, who run that de- 
lectable sheet, in scorn. Crothers, the cormorant, who is well 
learned in olden verse, may quote: 

"Thus neither the praise nor the blame is our own, 
No room for a sneer, much less than a cachinnus. 

We are vehicles, not of tobacco alone. 

But of everything else they may choose to put in us." 

The verse is certainly applicable: ''Vehicles of anything they 
may put in us!" Thus they trim their sails to every wind that 
blows. Here is the vile sheel confessing that it has known fur 
pears the evil effect of the pool-room, the track and all its at- 
tendant horrors, becoming a censor of the public and of its own 
vile self. Could abasement be more public, could any one ever 
show a more venal spirit in the public print than this miserable 
journalistic courtesan, who now desires to reform and be ac- 
cepted among respectable and self-respecting people. 

For eight year- since the News Letter began the fight against 
the track, it has been read every week by the editor and proprie- 
tor of the Bulletin, and for eight years the editor and proprietor 
of the Bulletin have accepted the advertisements of handicap 
artists, and have published the news of the race track, the form 
sheets, and in every way has encouraged the track. For years 
the Bulletin and ir- cowardly associates id' the soiled sisterhood 
of. the daily press has suppressed all sorts of articles telling of 
the terrible crimes following in the wake of the track. For years 
the editors and proprietors of these papers have smiled at the 
efforts of the News Letter to kill the terrible thing that was 
gnawing al the city's vitals, and have stood by telling one an- 
other that it was not their row. In every possible way these 
newspapers have assisted tin-' men to swindle the poor, deluded 
fools who played the game. For years the pool room has dis- 
graced the gateway to Marin County and made of beautiful 
Sausalito a lull hole. Did the Bulletin or the Call or the others 
belonging in the press prostitution prate their virtuous indigna- 
tion at what thev knew was one of the worst conditions that 
could befall a commonwealth? No. They did not say a word — 
they suppressed news, they aided the men who tried to kill the 
proprietor of the News Letter; they connived at jury bribing, 
they nullified the efforts of every district attorney who ever 
raised a voice or a hand against the track, and tfi every way that 
a malignant imagination may operate, thev HELPFD THF 
TRACK AND THE POOL ROOM. Time and time again. 
they have published the news of defalcations, and everv time 
that it was known beyond a doubt that the money stolen went r o 
the track, they have made a deep mystery of the disappearance 
of funds, and they have not known what this man or that woman 
did with the money. They have totally ignored arrests of petty 
thieves in order to shield the track. They have had informa- 
tion, by their reporters, of the running full blast of pool rooms, 
and they have bad a full knowledge of crooked practices at the 
track itself, and then thev have virtuously buried the news that 
the swindling ] 1 room and the tricking track might go on un- 
hindered fleering the dnpes, and thev have deliberately helped 
the gulled on rbeir way to the house of prostitution, the peni- 
tentiary and the suicide's grave! Thev have connived at all this! 
They have encouraged all this, and in the next breath they have 
sung the song of self-praise, of civic virtue and political re- 
generation! Not later than last week, the Call, in its account 
of the Woodman defalcation, did imt state that the money taken 
went to the track, and it did not tell another story that was infi- 
ll with the story of Woodman. All of these vir- 
tuous journals and these moral crusaders are in some distant 
way, socially or otherwise, connected with the track or its inter- 
ests, and they dare not run counter to these social, business or 
connections. And this from people who say thev would 
indict their "own brother'' if be were connected with the Ruef- 
ul ■bmitz business! 



Here we have the case of Spreckels. 
The Case of Speeckels. As we said last week, we have no 

such thing as " a very honest man" 
or a "partially honest man" to deal with. A man may be hon- 
esl aril that is all. There are no degrees, no variations in hon- 
esty. Either a man is altogether honest or be is dishonest ! This 
brighl young man. Mr. "Rudolph Spreckels (remember, it is al- 
leged, he has the management of his father's business and has 
the complete run of the Call to the extent that he makes his 



editors call his betters "gutter" newspaper men, and refers to 
the papers they conduct as "gutter press"), has the complete run 
of the Call ! He may do with it as he pleases, and he pleases just 
now to make it a personal organ. He plays to the gallery. He 
claims that he of all men is entitled to the name of "honest" 
man. He lays siege to what he calls the "allied villainies," he 
prates of the "predatory rich," he talks of civic pride and per- 
sonal morality. One may differ from Mr. Spreckels in his illu- 
sions as to what constitutes bribery, and what, constitutes ex- 
tortion. One may agree with Mr. Heney that it is extortion to 
demand money from a restaurateur and still be honest! One 
may disagree with Mr. Spreckels and Mr. Heney, and call it ex- 
tortion when a man or a newspaper holds up a street car magnate 
or the president of a water company or a gas corporation! Con- 
sistency should be the standard of measurement as to the ear- 
nestness of purpose or the honesty of those who chance to differ 
with Mr. Spreckels or Mr. Heney. 

Mr. Spreckels. as far as the race track is concerned, is no 
spring chicken. He knows all of its evils as well as we do. and 
lie could probably tell us of some that we know not of, and yet 
Mr. Spreckels, knowing all of these things, does nothing to stop 
the making of criminals at Emeryville. Mr. Spreckels does not 
raise a band to stop one kind of crime while he howls through 
his own brazen lungs, and the hired leathern lungs of the Heney 
man. the bray of the Langdon and the chirp of the lesser lights 
of the prosecution that he verily is an honest man, a paladin who 
is breaking lances in the political lists to save the Maid, San 
Francisco, who lies a-bleeding. Mr. Spreckels, Mr. Spreckels's 
father, John T). Spreckels. and all the Spreckelses. have known of 
the crimes of the track and its evil influence for years. Have they 
ever raised their combined voices against it? Are they honest, 
and may we differ in our opinion as to this assorted lot of damned 
hypocrites, when once they have been pilloried! Bead them at 
your leisure. It is an interesting study. Again we repeat that 
a man may be honest and that's all. He may not claim great 
honest}', civic pride and love of country in one direction, and 
then totally ignore it in another. Mr. Spreckels and his prose- 
cution may claim to honestly believe that certain people are 
guilty of crime and that they should be punished, and yet be 
honest. They may claim that the News Letter is boughten to ar- 
gue certain things, and honestly believe that they are right in 
his belief, and they are entitled to the respect of others in even 
this, their delusion, self-inflicted though it may be. There is 
surd a thing as self-hypnotism, an outgrowth of self-interest. 

Mr. Spreckels cannot escape the charge of being a hypocrite, 
if he does not immediately follow in the footsteps of (be Bulletin 
and advocate the closure of the track, in his plaything, the Call. 
We fully expect to convert the Call, as we have the Bulletin. 
The Bulletin, however, is not in the same class with the Call, 
and the solution of its sudden conversion lies in the fact that the 
raring season is over: that the Bulletin reads the hand-Writing 
on the wall, and that it knows the track must eventually go. and 
that it wants to be in the band wagon when the funeral dirge is 
played. There is never anything very deeply hidden in the dung 
of the Bulletin office, except the managerial head. 



IE 



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Fillmore Street, near Sutter, San Francisco 



.Iii.y i. inns. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 




'<W a^ vtilfky lie devil.m nit pa 



The Detective, 
When you were a grafter, and 1 was a sleuth, 

And we si 1 in the limelight's blaze 

How we played with the public and Eooled with the truth. 

In a thousand senseless ways. • 

The Confessed Boodler. 
When you were a sleuth and I was a crook, 

In the days that are gone, alas! 
I was foolish to let you thus bring me to book, 

For I've learned you're a consummate ass. 

The Public. 
We're tired unto death, disappear from our sight, 

For it's hard truth to tell who's the worst; 

But rest well assured that you both are a blight 

On those whom your presence has cursed. 

J. A. Henbhall. 

District Attorney Brown, of Alameda, says that the law 

protects race-track gambling, and was designed to do so al its 
enactment. Now, if District Attorney Brown will tell us who 
procured the enactment of these inadequate laws and the amount 
of the bribes that were paid, and to whom, the better elemenl of 
the community will be very grateful to him. It is possible, too, 
that if District Attorney Brown were to tell all he knows of 
this iniquity, he would involve among others s e of the legis- 
lators from Alameda County, where is also located one of the 
most notorious race-track infamies in the United States. Horse 
racing was once called "the sport of kings." [t no longer deservet 
that designation. It is now. in California, the sporl of thieves, 
dope fiends, strumpets, loafers, embezzling employees, convicts, 
touts, bunko men and millionaires. The race traei is frequented 
by the lowest dregs of the community, anil its profits are 

by men who would probably be in the penitentiary if they had 

their just deserts, or who would certainly wear the stri] 

felons if compelled to gel a livelihood by other means than this 
"legalized gambling." 'The Senator or Assemblyman il 
loses to vote for the passage of a law to wipe this infanrj 
existence in California al the uexl session of the Legislature 
ought to lie pilloried as an enemy of decency and good citizen- 
ship in every honest, self-respecting newspaper within ii 
tiers of the Slate. The Senator or Assemblyman that votes 

against a bill to abolish the race-track "ill convict himself by 

thai prima facie act as the i of the race-track capitalists 

or a boodler bribed by those capitalists. It will be a Hobsonian 
choice as far as public opinion regarding such men it 
cerned. 

1 observe thai Hilly Hearst is trying to bolster his bastard 

political partj by "uniting all consumers of water In San Fran- 
cisco to pool their issue- in an effort to check the encroachments 

of the Spring Valley Water Company on the rights of the pub- 
lic." 1 observe also that the Spreckels-owned ('all is trying to 
arouse "public sentiment" on the same question. I compare these 
i onistic "influences" to two kite-builders. Both of them 
cannot tly the same kite, but both can be partners in the kite 
ili:ii .mi,' ol them builds 'be other may only furnish the 
the kite. Walk up. gentlemen, and lay your bets: Who will tly 
ibis Spring Valley kite! Who will own the kite, and who will 

furnish the tail? It's an even guess, gentlemen, between i 
and Spreckels on either proposition. Red or black. The _ 
mad. — Roll ! 

What has happened to Hilly Langdon? He used to bo the 

District Attorney of this city and county, bat latterly thai 
fund ion se. n usurped h\ abler men. and Billy. 

aits away back, twilling his thumbs and drawi: _ ary. I 

move that William .1. Langdon bo impeached for incompi 
irrelevancy and immateriality. The motion is carried 
you're a dead one ; ! shroud. \ 



A lot of public-spirited, law-abiding citizens recently in- 
vaded the editorial rooms of a Sacramento newspaper with intent 
to intimidate the editor and compel him to retract something he 

had written for his newspaper, which the public-spirited, law- 
abiding citizens did not like. The editor had accused the town 
of immorality, notwithstanding the fact that the administration 
of its affairs is wholly in the control of Lincoln-Roosevelt reform- 
ers, whose slogan is " I town with everything that doesn't suit us." 
One of this holy .bunch of sanctified pharisees proposed to tar the 
editor, denying him the usual compliment of feathers: another 
Holy Joe wanted to deprive the editor of his source of income by 
boycotting his advertising columns. Finally, the bowling mob oi 
public-spirited and law-abiding citizens decided to call on the 
editor and tell him to his face what they though! ol him. and de- 
mand that he swallow his editorials bodily and without a single 
grain of salt. I don't know what the editor said to these public- 
spirited and law-abiding citizens, or whether he yielded to the 
clamor and threats of the mob who were trying to gag him, but 
I do know what I would have done in his place. If I had been 
the editor of that newspaper, 1 would have first read a certain 
section of the Constitution of the United Stales to that mob in 
lieu of the riot act; then I would have turned the office hose on 
(hem; and finally I would have sworn out warrants against them 
individually and severally, charging them with conspiracy under 
the Federal statutes. This is the only way to deal with public- 
spirited and law-abiding citizens who seek by intimidation I 

coercion to throttle the liberty of tin' press to tell tin' truth about 
Sacramento. 

Francis .1. Heney is obviously blatherskjting for revenue 

only. He was bom ami reared a Democrat of the good old Irish 
type, bul finding the politici of his father unprofitable, he lias 

tur I renegade, sold his political birth-right for a mess o* 

pottage, and is now sacrificing at the altars ol strange gods, lie 

is the friend ol' Roosevelt, ami in- I sts of "mi imacy" with Taft ; 

hr i- a howling dervish of the Lincoln-Roosevelt League, am! a 
stern opponent of all things Di Hi- revenue al this 

time i- derived Indirectly from Rudolph Spreckels, but if Taft 

is i'i ''I h'' hopi - i" ft and lucrative. I f Bryan 

ted, Francis J. Heney will be souped. This is an ex< 
argument in favor ol 

President David Starr Jordan has been in 

curbed by the trus -. It is too bad that he. in hi- old age, 

should | years 

ago. Now that the hi '. and the enlhii-iasi 

wrong to brim; up all old scores and attempt to punish ! 
iiarv efforts of an earlier day. 




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We cordially invite your inspection. 

VAN NESS AVE. at BUSH ST. 



SAN FEANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 4, 1908. 



"^'>■ ' ■^TU' ' »'- ' - l ■^;^-"■' x ^ " 



Wt 



Looker On 







In detaching Naval Constructor J. G. Tawresy from duty at 
the Union Iron Works, and ordering him to the navy-yard at 
Portsmouth, N. H., the navy department removes from this city 
one of its best-known and most capable naval officers. Tawresy 
has been stationed here for over six years, as supervising con- 
structor for the Government in connection with the many war- 
ships that have oeen built at the Union Iron Works, including the 
Ohio, California, South Dakota, Tacoma, Wyoming, Grampus, 
Pike and others. His departure for his new field in the East will 
be greatly regretted by all who have had the pleasure of coming 
in contact with him, either professionally or socially. 

• * * 

It must be a cruel blow to the missionaries to learn that 
Mohammedanism is making great strides in India far in ad- 
vance of those of Christianity's apostles. In spite of their zeal, 
which varies in both extent and quality, the Christian mission- 
aries, after generations of effort, have made no appreciable im- 
pression upon the myriads in the Orient, with whom the sword 
of the soldier has been a far greater civilizer than the bible and 
psalms of the missionary. 

* * * 

Of all the silly and reprehensible fads of this epoch, none is 
sillier or more reprehensible than that of pilfering "souvenirs" 
from restaurants and hotel cafes. It is usually women who in- 
dulge in this form of depravity, but many men are also guilty of 
it. I have been told by a well-known Boniface that he loses so 
many knives, forks and spoons, and even larger articles of table- 
ware, that he has to include this loss in his estimate of annual 
expenses, and it is by no means a small loss, either. Of course, 
he gauges his price list accordingly. 

» » * 

In all the mass of discussion anent the recent action of Mrs. 
Clarence Mackay in smoking a cigarette at a Eeno banquet, I 
have not caught a word of what seems to me the real significance 
of her act. There is no doubt that cigarette smoking among 
American women is increasing at a rate that will soon put our 
American women on a par with the Continental Lady Nicotine. 
Mrs. Mackay's act has been used as a peg upon which to hang 
this assertion, and the now tiresome subject of a woman's right 
to enjoy a cigarette is being kicked around in the press until 
it i6 scuffed at the heels. To my notion, the question involved 
is not the matter of a woman's prerogative to smoke, but the 
evil of introducing the weed to growing girls. There is no doubt 
that the Nevada college girl has been given an impetus to smoke 
by Mrs. Mackay. Mrs. Mackay is a joint benefactor with her 
husband: she is beautiful, intelligent and fascinating. What 
more natural than that this dazzling vision should be taken as 
a model by the little Western college girl across whose vision she 
has flitted? Mrs. Mackay smokes her cigarette at an academic 
banquet, and puff! out rush the little co-eds for a package of the 
weed, that they, too, may learn to blow smoke rings! Nonsense? 
Well, I have it on the word of a Nevada university girl that every 
single member of her sorority is learning to smoke cigarettes. 
"It's so provincial not to smoke," she said. "Why, look at Mrs. 
Mackay, who stands for everything that is big and fine, and 
here she smokes, and in public at that." 

Which proves that if smoking among women is going to be 
general, there should be a distinct effort to discourage it for girls, 
just as growing boys are made to see the evils of smoking before 
they are of age. To be sure, a deplorable percentage of young 
boys smoke, but at least there is a general understanding among 
the boys that it stunts their growth, and has other injurious 
effects. If girls are going to become victims of the cigarette 
habit as well as boys, we can look forward to an undersized race. 
In England, the recent Children's Bill provides that boys under 
sixteen may be searched for cigarettes, and tobacconists selling 
cigarettes to children may be held culpable by the law. Before 
we become generally addicted to the habit, it might be well to 
study the consequences of the effect of our example to our 
children. 



"WHITE HORSE" 

SCOTCH WHISKEY 

FROM 

MACKIE 8 CO., 

ISLAT, SCOTLAND 

NEVER IN BULK 

Charles Meinecke & Co. 



Agents Pacific Coast 
V. 



San Francisco 



One of the most praiseworthy of the several private bills in- 
I reduced into Congress at its last season was that for the relief 
of Lieutenant-Commander II. A. Wiley, 1". S. Navy. It has for 
its purpose the restoration of Wiley to his standing in the class 
of '87, U. S. N. A., in which class he entered the Naval Academy. 
When Wiley was a third-classman, Captain, now Rear-Admiral, 
P. M. Ramsay, one of the most radical and anarchistic marti- 
nets of the service, was superintendent of that institution, and 
he took upon himself to assume that the hazing of a candidate 
for admission to the academy was unlawful, which it is not. 
Finding Wiley engaged in the hazing of a candidate, he had him 
dismissed, entirely without legal warrant, and of course Wiley 
had no difficulty in getting re-instated. But he lost a year in 
his service, thus falling far to the rear in advancement, and it is 
for the purpose of restoring to him the numbers he thus lost in 
his seniority that bill has been introduced. Lieutenant-Com- 
mander Wiley is recognized as one of the ablest officers in the 
service, and has more than once displayed gallantry of which the 
navy is proud, particularly in the disastrous Samoan hurricane 
of 1889, when, as a midshipman on board the flagship Trenton, 

he bravely risked his own life to save others. 

* * * 

According to the New Zealand Herald, tin- cities of Sydney 
and Melbourne are preparing to spend .*->.")U,<mm> each in welcom- 
ing the American fleet. The only occasion in which this amount 
was exceeded in the Australasian empire of Great Britain was in 
1901, during the Commonwealth celebrations. 

The Australian is vastly proud of his American cousin. He, 
with an undeveloped continent on his hands, realizes far more 
than the Englishman the tremendous progress of this country, 
and its impending dominance in world affairs. 

The Oriental peril which confronts both countries, and con- 
cerning which both peoples take a common stand, is also a power- 
ful factor in cementing the bonds of friendship. The sight of a 
squadron flying the Stars and Snipes defending the ports of 
the Southern continent from some future Colossus of the Orient, 
when he shall have built his fleets, marshalled his soldiers and 

perfected his plans, is not altogether impossible. 

* * * 

It would seem as if the trades unionists were the same the 
world over. The one fly in the ointment of the proposed hos- 




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July 1. 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



pitality as pictured in the Australian papers is contained in 
dilution put to a vote and carried by the Trades 
.Hall Council of Sydney, viz. : "That the proposed expenditure 
of £50,000 in entertaining the American fleet is a criminal waste 
of money while thousands in our midst are wanting work." 

It is the same old story all out the world. Whether it be in 
America, England, Germany or any civilized country, if any 
projei i is endorsed by the people as a whole, which does not in 
some way directly till the pockets of the labor monopolists, they 
immediately start the resolution mill. Happily, no one pays 
much attention to their resolves, and it is evident that the Ameri- 
can fleet is in for a reception in Australia that will in future 
years be pointed out as a crucial moment in the history of both 
countries. 

* * * 

Next Sunday morning, several prominent members of the 
Union League Club will repair to a breakfast arranged in honor 
of a member who wagered that he could spend the night com- 
fortably indoors, without putting up at a hotel or throwing him- 
self on the mercy of charitable institutions, friends or acquaint- 
ances. The wager was made, and at nine o'clock on Wednesday 
evening the chap set about for his unique resting place. His be- 
wildered friends followed him to the ferry, where he bought 
an arm t'ul of tickets, and with a "night nightie, boys," he got on 
the ferry boat, curled himself up on a bench in the cabin, and 
went fast asleep. Of course a deck hand jostled him out of his 
sound sleep when the boat landed. His companions, who were 
watching the scene, heard him say : "And to think that this is the 
first time I have been able to sleep comfortably in months ! I 
am dying of asthma, and I can't breathe on land, so I thought 
I'd try a snooze on the ferry. Here's a bunch of tickets for my 
fares, and now, for God's sake, let me get a little sleep to-night, 
for who knows — it may be the last time !" The deck-hand looked 
a little dazed, but properly sympathetic, and agreed not to dis- 
turb him. His companions landed with the rest of the passen- 
gers, sadder but wiser men, and the winner of the wager actually 
spent the night snoozing on the ferry, every now and then waking 
up to give an imitation of an asthmatic, and arousing the tendei 
solicitude of the deck hands. 

* * * 

The class of people in San Francisco, who are always looking 
for trouble, and try to get it out of their systems by rending the 
air with their demands for a change in the street railway system, 
would do well to study the present conditions in Cleveland. A 
San Franciscan, visiting in Cleveland, mites me that the new 
street ear system for which the people uited and which is the 
beginning of Mayor Johnson's plan for municipal ownership, has 
created so much dissatisfaction sines it has been put into opera- 
tion that mass meetings block the streets, protesting again 
system, [nstead of benefiting the people, it has worked a 
hardship on the masse--. Eor thoi enl fare hat 

established, an additional charge is made for each transfer issued, 
and many working people living in the suburbs find that it costs 
I hem from 80 to I to and from their work. \- .1 

result, almost as many are walking as during the strike, and vio- 
lent pressure may be brought to hear to change this on 
things. 

* * * 

Those opn 1 lemon who have become independently 

rich through their administration of racing 

out the country are beginning to realize that once public spirit 
is aroused against - t is time to fold their tents like 

the \r.ie ill lently steal away. New York was the first 3 

to go on re, -i the crime-breeding garni ; Louisiana fol- 

lowed with triumph, inspiring i p, and now 

Kentucky, where the thoroughbred Btall 

imple set it. and may pass a law to kill the 

d. California is manifestly inactive, bul it is doubt- 
ful if the law-makers can long resist the clamor which is being 
made om our state. 

Hors t. Nearly every man that 

frequen 'ling imple- 

ment : and i 

between thoroughbreds, unless they can b 

The most conservative men in t that if the 

contim og must urivate 

.. which no law can i le numbered. 

and the sooner the moneyed few who 



* N * 




[ustrousfves 



are 



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V§\ for Weak - Red - Inflamed 
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thrive on the blood-mon tided, weak-minded men are shut 

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v 



The Indiana Railroad Commission has solemnly declared 

that the grade crossing is the "greal American crime." Mayor 
Taylor of Alameda declared the same thing, a long time ago 
yet resolutions and declarations do not lower the grades or make 
them conform to wanted is action, not 

wind. 



A HOME COMFORT. 

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NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 
Estate of David Nelson. Deceased. 



' 



Fran, i! 
I NAN * HK 



Hynes. administrator 
ceased, to the creditors of and all 
xhiblt them with 
the first pi; 

b said ofllep • 
in all matters connected with said 



estate o 
J. O'TOOI.E 









SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 4, 1908. 



SUESUM CORDA. 

Come Angel of The Long Sword, 

I'll smile you greetings of a care-defying life. 

Come when you list, you'll find me waiting, 

Nor tears nor sobs shall stay your hand. 

For will you not bring oblivion, 

Eternity's sweetest flower. 

It's fragrance shall lull my senses into kindliest sleep, 

And all our witless world shall find rest in its 

Exhalations. 

Even those, my dearest enemies, 

Who smile vacantly at Time 

Shall be enamored of its peace. 

And this I grudge them. 

For I would have them live 

And carry their futile lives 

To every star that decks 

The firmament. 

Even the uncrowned king of space, 

The mighty Betelgoux, I'd burden 

With the burden of their lives. 

And not content, I'd have them barter 

Manhood, heart and soul on every comet's tail 

That sweeps the universe. 

And every atom of the same 

I'd people with these who crave 

An endless consciousness 

For trifling egos, 

Weak loves and selfish selves. 

All twin-souls, affinities and those 

Who cloak the primal passions 

And instincts of the ape 

'Neath esoteric cant and cryptic phrase 

I'd bind together with a hoop of steel 

Welded in the furnace of the blistering hours 

That stamped them hypocrites ; 

Then whirl them through the ages 

Until Time, disenchanted with their disenchantment, 

Weary of their cries for freedom, each from each, 

Sick unto death of tears straining 

From their sightless eyes, forgets. 

And those who sell the people under 

Statesman guise, to cold and distant 

Worlds, puny, like this we live on, 

Meanest of all worlds, 

Unpeopled save by statesmen of the ilk, 

I'd banish to watch the drear eternities unfold. 

And of the corporate breed that fatten 

On the ills of stupid, dull Democracy; 

No punishment for these but bribing. 

No whip3, but constant purchase 

Of the things they want and need not 

And having, cannot learn to use. 

No less for these than for the prig 

Freighted with a knowledge found in books, 

Airing the same through fear of moths ; 

Or social mountebank that from the great height 

Of some parlor mantel-piece 

Looks down upon the doers of the earth's good work ; 

Or foolish female with diminutive brain 

In state of unrest continuous : 

All these I'd herd together beyond the void 

Where beat the Seven Seas of Space; 

Force them through the unborn aeons to hear 

The babel of their own voices 

Ringing on endless shores that stretch 

To limitless horizons. 

But wherefore? When the Long Sword 

Cuts the thread, then all is done. 

Into the lethal chamber every one 

To bathe in sleep and catch the fragrance 

Of forgetfulness. 

— Joseph Noel in June Ore rili ii, i Monthly. 

BUGGY FOB SALE. 
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N.S.CASEYl.'lr OPTICIAN 



I 558 Fillmore Street, at Geary 



July 4, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



PLEASURED 

¥AND 






By Barnett Franklin. 




Mrs. FisJee and Ibsen, at the Alcazar. 

The performance of Henrik Ibsen's "Rosmersholm" at the 
Alcazar Theatre records a personal triumph for America's most 
distinguished actress alone. So far as I can see, Norway's re- 
markable dramatist, in this instance, is unworthy of his inter- 
preter. Mrs. Fiske's art scores in spite, and not because, of him. 

Now, I am not of those that ejaculate "What's the use?" in 
an appraisement of the entire output of the mystic high-priest of 
the morbid. To my notion, Ibsen must be reckoned with — apart 
from his influence upon dramatic literature for simplicity, un- 
theatricism and clarity — as a writer of several great plays. His 
"Ghosts," for instance, is certainly to be classed among the 
greatest, say, half-dozen dramas that we have. But "Rosmer- 
sholm" displays in its make-up few of the compelling factors 
of "Ghosts." This is, of course, a play-house judgment of it i 
but the values in dramatic literature are only to be gauged over 
the footlights. Under the shade of the lamp on the library cen- 
ter-fable at home, "Rosmersholm" looms far more illuminativelv. 
but since Ibsen was writing essentially for the theatre, the view- 
point must be directed from a seat in the parquet. 

It is not quite clear why Mrs. Fiske saw fit to select the role of 
Rebecca West as a vehicle for the exploitation of her splendid 
abilities, looking at it primarily as regards opportunity for ef- 
fective histrionics. She has but two scenes that call for any 
particular display of strength. The one is the confession scent; 
of the third act, when she tells that it was she who forced Ros- 
mer's wife to suicide, partly for the sake of Kosmer himself and 
partly that she might supplnnl (he unfortunate wife in the affec- 
tions of the man she secretly loves. Here Mrs. Fiske was superb 
in her intellectual force ami compelling with almosl psychic 








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Mrs. Pi»J mersholm," at the New .1 tfrs. 

power. Her curious complexity oi emotions is delinenr 
Bubtle rarities; there i-; not a tigment of stock stage-trickery 
contributed ; the quintessence of naturalness and a marvelo 

in arc substituted for theatrical clap-trap artifice. Then, 



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The beauty of the Baldwin tone has endeared 
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10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEE 



July 4, 1908. 



again, she has her opportunity in the last act when, after refus- 
ing Rosmer's offer of marriage, she agrees curiously enough in 
the Ibsen sort of way to prove her love for him by going the way 
of his first wife and jumping into the mill-race. 

But apart from these two instances, "Rosmersholm" seems un- 
worthv of Mrs. Piske. her time and her art. Her remarkable 
mil rv and r r< -u 1 1 ■ j i ■ 1 < . 1 1 - |»i»vr were belter expended upon a bet- 
ter cause. Illogical and profoundly unpleasant as it is, "Ros- 
mersholm" serves no better purpose than the dispensing of a 
mass of psychological conversation that captivates solely the 
short-haired ladies and the long-haired gentlemen. It is brandy 
and soda for those that are Buffering from cureless culturine. 
but it misses the devotees of rare roast beef. 

Ibsenites have declared that the real ulivt'or of "Rosmersholm" 
lies in the exploitation of the political dogmas of the contending 
parties of Norway a score of years ago. Ii is claimed, in sooth. 
that it is a political drama. But, barring a lot of tedious and 
tiresome harangue about higher-ups and the influence of the 
press and such-like things, the political influence only succeeds 
in muddling and marring what little action there is to the play. 

The Manhattan Company, which supports Mrs. Piske, is a 
strikingly capable organization. It i- particularly strong in 
character actors, and the Rector Kroll of Fuller Mellish and 
William Norton's Mortensgard are admirably conceived and por- 
trayed. The capable Albert Bruiting is likewise excellent as Ul- 
ric Brendel, the seedy philosopher. It is. in fact, the very not- 
able quality of the whole performance that the more patently 
exhibits that the playwright is the debtor to his interpreters. 
Mr. Ibsen owes more to Mrs. Piske than Mrs. Fiske does to "Ros- 
mersholm.'' 

But still, our disappointment as to the play does not o'er- 
shadow our pleasure in again seeing this most untheatrical of 
our actresses. In the face of the antiquated, stagey, road-worn 
methods of the regulation star. Mrs. Piske's cardinal charac- 
teristic, naturalness, is as a breath of the oeean-wafted breeze — 
if I may be pardoned a sort of spring poet's simile. She is cer- 
tainly doing more than any other American actress to disrupt 
the obviously theatrical and unreal in the portrayal of the drama, 
and her great mental grasp upon its fundaments, and her fine 
discrimination and art ag, as well as her marvelous tech- 

nique, are pretty big assets of the American theatre. 

"Rosmersholm." howi rer. i an radiate no plausibility or convic- 
tion for those that walk with a springy step, breathe untainted 

ozone, and keep a weather-optic on the eerulean of the sky. 

* * * 

"It Happened in Nordland," at the Princess. 

Decidedly the best thing that happens this fortnight over in 
Ellis street is the comedy of Arthur Cunningham. Cunning- 
ham, for the first time in my experience, shelves that ponderous 
baritone of his. and assumes a wheezy little falsetto speaking 

voice that easily captures the cc idian's encomiums. I haven't 

quite recovered from my astonishment yet 

In addition to finding Mr. Cunningham at his histrionic best, 
you will discover that (he entire Princess Company is at its top- 
piest record. Whai with several excellent recruits from the Or- 
pheum and elsewhere, and the excellent easting of the stand-bys. 
the performance moves with a greater snap and spirit than any 
in the history of the theatre. 

Julius Steger and his capable harpist, John Romano, are 
among the new-comers. Steger plays his original role of Dr. 
Pilotz. igist and proprietor of Blotz's Pain Killer, singe 

the clever "Absinthe Frappc" sons in decidedly artistic manner. 
and gets some good comedy out of the role. In fact, warb' 
the first water is contributed by ■■• irly every one. Both 

Christina Neilson and Charles Couture Bhow up to better advan- 
tage in this piece than they have hitherto simply because the 
demands made upon them are singing ones only. Their respec- 
tive solos in Tie Si cond acl are among the bits of the evening, and 
certainly worthy of the numerous encores they reap. 

Then there is May Boley, whom you will probably remember 
as being at the Orpheum lately. Miss Boley, at the Prince-, is 
eminently superior to her vaudeville self, and she is a big buo ess 
in helping along the fast and furious fun of the show. Her 
sense of travesty is excellent, indeed. 

William Burress invests the part of Hubert with considerable 
unction, and Oscar Apfel, Prank Farrington and Sarah Edwards 
in minor roles are genuinely funny and thoroughly in (be spirit 
of the thing. 







^L. Jf4 ^H 




\ 

■ 

V 


i 



Miss Fremont Benton toko is appearing at the Orpheum. 

It is absolutely undiluted praise that must be tendered to "It 
Happened in Nordland," and the people who make possible it- 
Glen MacDonough has built a libretto that abounds with 
witty lini a and humorous situations crammed with the real spirit 
of burlesque. The music of Victor Herbert is really entitled to 
being termed "tuneful," for it all has a swing that is captivating. 
Much of the credit for this should go to Mr. Sell] Simonson, the 
new wielder of the baton, whose control of his bandsmen is id- 
mirable. The costuming is gay and fresh from the seamstress, 
ami. in fad. everything conduces to the mosl enjoyable sort of an 
evening in Nordland. Go to the Princess one of these evenings 
by all means. 

* * * 

Vaudeville at the Orpheum. 

Marcel's "Bas Reliefs" are the new stars at the Orpheum. and 
the simulation of statuary is a veritable eyc-fest. The posing 
and exposing of the human form divine is cleverly conceived and 
portrayed, and there is not a suggest inn of auggestiveness in the 
entire act. It is as artistic a feature as the Orpheum has had in 
months. 

Fred Bond and Fremont Benton get a package of laughs out 
of a farce-absurdity called "Handkerchief No. IV Mr. Bond 
is a clever farceur with ingenious methods for laugh-extracting. 

The card and coin conjuring of Leipzig is adroitly done, and 
his tricks have the virtue of oovelty to even a satiated variety- 
follower. Grant and IToas might easily be spared from the bill. 
and especially the dreary, teary recitation that he inflicts upon 
us to the accompaniment of Eliza-crossing-the-ice music. Grais's 
amusing simian thespians. Clifford and Burke, and the Fadettes 
round out a particularly diverting programme. 



ADVANCE A NNO UNCEMENTS. 

The pictorial features of "The Great Divide," the turn 

I play by William Vaughn Moody, which Henry Miller is 



July 4, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



to present at the Van Ness Theatre next week, as the inaugural 
offering of his season there, are worthy, it is said of special men- 
lion. There is one Bcene in particular — that of the second act, 
which calk for an elaborate reconstruction of the stage of the 
Van Ness Theatre in order to secure the remarkable realism of 
the settings. This scene shows "The Roof of the Rockies," the 
very top of the American Cordilleras, and is a huge cycloramic 
\ iew of the towering peaks. The entire drama constitutes a love 
romance that is declared to be full of daring originality, and a! 
times of almost sensational situations. The fact that the play 
enjoyed a run of hvo whole seasons in New York City and has 
played everywhere to crowded houses from coast to coast, makes 
ii seem sure to have a powerful appeal to San Francisco play- 
goers. 

* * * 

The musical extravaganza, "It Happened in Nordland," is 
drawing packed houses at the Princess Theatre. It has undoubt- 
edly scored the greatest hit of the present season, and in conse- 
quence of this prosperous state of affairs, will be continued all 
next week. The production is a very beautiful one, and the en- 
tire entertainment is delightful from start to finish. "It Hap- 
pened in Nordland" is I'eviewed in another column. 

The programme at the Orpheum next week will have for its 
chief novel feature, "A Night on a House Boat," the most recent 
New York vaudeville hit. It is said to be a beautiful and clever 
production which introduces a variety of types of character in 
an entertaining and original manner. The other new acts will 
be the marvelous Patty Frank troupe, seven in number, who are 
conceded to be the greatest of European acrobats; Mi-, and Mrs. 
George A. Beane, who rank among the cleverest character ac- 
tors of the East, who will present a highly dramatic sketch, en- 
titled "A Woman's Way," and Bertie Herron, the original "Min- 
strel Miss," who has the distinction of bring tin 1 first woman to 
do a black-face turn in vaudeville. Jean Marcel, whose bas re- 
liefs and living statuary have created such a sensation, will pre- 
sent a series of new subjects. Next week will be the last of Leip- 
zig, tin' peerless conjuror, Grani and Hoag, and of Fred Bond 
and Fremont Benton. New Motion Pictures will conclude the 
performance. 

* * * 

Thousands of folk who were unable to obtain admittance to 
the Alcazar during the recent run of "The Rose of the Rancho," 
will be gratified to learn that the Belaseo-Tully play is to be re- 
vived next Sunday afternoon for eleven performances, including 
three matinees. All that was then written in eulogy of the 
beautiful production could be more than repeated, for it is now 
drawing capacity audiences to Oakland's leading theatre, where 
the Alcazar players are making their first stand away from home. 

Bessie Barriseale as Juanita : Bertram Lytell as the Govern- 
ment Agent; Will R. Walling as the land-jumper ; Burt V. 
as the padre: Howard Hickman as the Caatilian dandy from 
Monterey, and all the other Ales ai Favorites in iheir former 
respective roles, will appear in "The Rose of the Rancho." 

* * * 

Daniel Frohman, President of the Actors 1 Pond of America, 
who is now in this city, will assist (lie Committee of Managers 
in organizing a monster benefit for this fund. It is to take place 
at flu' Van Ness Theatre em Thursday afternoon, July oth. and 
»ill be a continuous performani n the hours of 1 and 

5.30. The Fund has dene so much in behalf of the actors of 
America, and especially has afforded such liberal and constant 
relief to proi on the Coast, that no doubt all branches 

of the playhouse will combine to make the benefit a n 
success. The greatest array of -act plays, vaudeville 

turns and specially prepared farces, will make up a lengthy and 
irogramme. Orders for seats may be sent to the box- 
office of the Van Ness Theatre, and they will be filled in the order 
\mong the star- ir are Henry Miller, May 

Robson, Margaret Ellington, Isabel Irving and Julie- - 

* « » 

The Orpheum management announces that it will open its 

down-town theatre on O'Farrel! - later than March 1st 

of next vear. 

* * • 

California present Gilbert and Sulli- 

van's comii opera, "The <■ indol ■ -.' under the direction 
vv. I!, Bartiett, ■ ly and S tnrday 



evenings, July 10th and [lth, L908. The costumes to be used 
m this opera arc flu- mosl elaborate thai can be secured, having 
been made especially Eot this production, The music is extremely 
catchy, and full of life and energy. The scenery is must spec- 
tacular. The proceeds of tins opera are to lie donated In charity. 
Tickets are on sale al the music store of Benjamin Curtaz X Sen. 



THE GLORIOUS FOURTH. 

BY F. K. 

Mom in:/. 

Little bey ! 

Little gun! 
Little powder ! 
Lots of fun. 

Noun. 

Little Hash! 

Little singe! 
Little boy 

"Seein thins." 

Night. 

Big slipper I 
Mighty yell ! 

Fourth lias ended 
Very well. 



. I iinn/s Young. 

He — Young girls always want to marry for love, but when 
they grow older they want to marry a man with money. She — 
You're wrong. They don't grow older. They merely grow 
wiser. — St. Joseph Press-News. 



Orpheum 



ILT.I5 ST.. H1AR FtLLMOM. 



Week beginning ties Sunday afternoon. Matinee 

ARTISTIC VAUDEVILLE. 

NIGHT ON A HOUSE BOAT, iiif latest New Ymk vaudeville hit; 
7 PATTY PRANK TROUPE; MH AND MRS. QEORGE A 
BEANE; BERTIE HERRON: MARCEL'S BAS RELrBPS and 
LIVING STATUARY; LEIPZIG; GRANT AND HOAG; NEW OR- 

M motion ni'Trr.Kis Last «■• 
of FliEU BOND AN I' FREMONT BENTON I Ighable 

farce, HANDKERCHIEF NO, 15." 

Evening pliers 10, :'.".. 50, 7.1- l'-"\ Beats, Jl. Phone West 6000. 
eept Sundays and holidays), LO Phone West 6,000. 



New Alcazar Theatre 



COR. SUTTER AND 
STE1NER STS 

BIL1SCO * MATRR. Ownin «o4 Stutter* abtotaUlT "Hut A" Balldlnf 

Sixty-ninth week of ii- Btock Company. Commencing 

Sunday afternoon, .Inly 6th. f"i eight nights and three matinees, 
revival of ornla life, 

THE ROSE OF THE RANCHO, 
By Davi.l Belasco ana Richard Walton Tally. 

- — Evenlnc. - Matinee Sun- 

day and Sac 

Monday, July Uth— MR WHITE WHITTLESEY and the Alcazar 
players in ins GRACE DU ORAMMONT, by Clyde F 

CORNER VAN NESS AVE. 

AND CROVE STREET 

OOTTLOB. B1RX 4 CO . Pr„pi ftn4 Mf ,. ftin«« Mmri.t 5» 

Beginning Monday. July 8th Saturdays only, the 

HENRY MILLER SEASON I. urine the first two weeks will lie 
presented 

THE GREAT DIVIDE. 
By William VauKhn M< hundred night.* In New York 

Mr. Miller ■ 
Next pia] MATED 



Van Ness Theatre 




THEATRE 

PHONE 
WEST 663 



Ellis Street near Fillmore. 

Class "A" Theatre 
Prices— Evenings 35c. 50c. 75c 
Matinees, except Sundays and hol- 
IJa\ s. 25c and 50c. 
Matin- - 
musical fxtravapanxa p;; 

IT HAPPENED IN NORDLAND. 
Specla: t -if JULIUS STEGER. MAY R< "»I«RY. WM. 

Rt'RRE.— 



A. W. BEST 



ALICE BEST 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 



1628 BUSH STREET 



LIfK I 






13 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 4, 1908. 



BANKING 



The Canadian Bank af Commerce 



With which are amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia, the Halifax 
Banking Co. and the Merchants' Bank of Prince Edward Island. 
HEAD OFFICE— TORONTO. 

Paid-up Capital ?10, 000,000 Reserve Fund J5, 000, 000 

Aggregate Resources, over $113,000,000. 

B. E. WALKER, President ALEX. LAIRD. General Manager. 

LONDON OFFICE— 2 Lombard St., E. C. 

NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 

BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlin. Cranbrook, Fernle. 
Greenwood, Kamloops, Ladysmith, Nanalmo, Nelson, New Westminster, 
Pentlcton. Prince Rupert, Princeton, Vancouver (3), and Victoria. 

YUKON TERRITORY — Dawson and White Horse. 

UNITED STATES— Portland, Seattle and Skagway (Alaska). 

OTHER BRANCHES— Alberta. 26; Saskatchewan, 18; Manitoba, 20; 
Ontario and Quebec, 62; Maritime Provinces, 19. 

BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England, The Bank of Scot- 
land, Lloyd's Bank, Ltd.. The Union of London, and Smith's Bank, Ltd. 

AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The First National Bank. 

AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS — The Commercial National Bank. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Main Office, 326 California St. Branch— Cor. Van 
Ness and Eddy. 
A. KAINS. Manager. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Asst. Manager. 

The German Savings & Loan Society 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital {1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up In cash 1,000.000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,428,855.93 

Deposits, Dec. 31, 1907 36,907,687.60 

Total assets 39,629.434.87 

Remittances may be made by Draft, Post Office or Wells. Fargo & Co.'s 
Money Orders, or coin by Express. 

Office Hours — 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock p. m., except Saturdays to 
12 m., and Saturday evenings from 7 o'clock p. m. to 8 o'clock p. m. for 
receipt of deposits only. 

OFFICERS — President. N. Ohlandt: First Vice-President, Daniel Meyer; 
Second Vice-President, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant 
Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary. George Tourny; Assistant Secre- 
tary, A. H. Muller; Goodfellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— N. Ohlandt. Daniel Meyer. Emil Rohte. Ign. 
Stelnhart. I. N. 'Walter. J. W. Van Bergen, F. Tillmann, Jr.. E. T. Kruse 
and W. S. Goodfellow. 



The Anglo-Galifornian Bank, Limited 



Head Office — 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 
Capital Authorized. $6,000,000. Paid-up, $1,600,000 

Subscribed. $3,000,000 Reserve Fund. $700,000 

This bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout 
the world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells ex- 
change and bullion. 
IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LILIENTHAL. Managers. 

J. FRIBDLANDER. Cashier. 



London, Paris and American Bank, Ltd. 



N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Streets. 
Subscribed Capital, $2,600,000. Paid-up Capital, $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $1,200,000. 
Head Office — 40 Threadneedle St.. London. E. C. 
AGENTS — New York — Agency of the London, Paris and American 
Bank, Limited, No. 10 Wall street. N. Y.; Paris — Messrs. Lazard Freres 
& Cle, 17 Boulevard Polssonler. Draw direct on the principal cities of 
the world. Commercial and Travelers' credits Issued. 
S. GREENEBAUM, H. FLEISHHACKER, Managers. 

R. ALTSCHUL. Cashier. 



Mutual Saviigs Bank of San Francisco 



Building at 706 Market Street. Opposite Third. 
Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000. Paid-up capital and surplus. $620,000 

James D. Phelan, President; John A. Hooper. First Vice-President; 
James K. Moffitt, Second Vice President; George A. Story. Cashier; C. 
B. Hobson. Assistant Cashier; A. E. Curtis, Second Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan, John A. Hooper. J. K. Moffitt, Frank 
J. Sullivan, Rudolph Spreckels. R. D. McElroy. Charles Holbrook, J. C. 
McKinstry. Rolla V. Watt. 

This bank does a savings business exclusively, paying Interest on all 
deposits. One dollar will open an account, and remittances can be sent 
by Express, Post-Offlce order or check. Write for particulars. 

Hours — 10 to 3 p. m.: Saturdays. 10 to 12 m.; Saturday evenings, for de- 
posits only, 5:30 to 8 p. m. 



Central Trust Company of California 

42 Montgomery St. Branches: 3039 16th St.; 624 Van Ness Avenue. 

Accounts of Individuals, Firms, Corporations, Unions, Societies 
solicited. Interest paid on Savings Accounts. Drafts sold on all 
parts of the world. 

Capital paid In, $1,500,000 Resources, $6,025,939.09 

B. G. TOGNAZZI, Manager. 



USE MAYERLE'S EYEWATER 
for one day and notice the wonderful effects 

Bright. Strong and Healthy Eyes will be the 
result. Price 50 cents; by mail, 65 cents; Per 
dozen. $5, Prepaid. Mayerle's Antiseptic Eye- 
Glass Wipers, to be used when glasses blur, 
tire or strain the eye, 2 for 25 cents. 

Msycrlo'n Ejrc Water is guaranteed uinlor tlio U. P. 
Pure Food Drug Act. Juno 30. 1006. Serial 7370 

George Mayerle, German Expert Optician, 
Webster. 




1149 Golden Gate 
Phone West >i66. 



Avenue, near 



Meyerle'i QUlie* reit »nd •trsogtheD the eye* tad preserve Ibe eight. 



®lj? minister of Jfaretgn Affairs 

The recent conference between King 
Serious Complications. Edward and Emperor Nicholas, 

which followed close upon the heels 
of a conference between Edward and President Follieres, lias 
agitated diplomatic circle? to a high pitch of excitement, and 
serious events are predicted in the not-distant future. Indeed, 
the peace of Europe has not been so threatened since the i men- 
tion of the nations at Algeeiras, when France and Germany came 
so near going to war over the Moroccan question. The situation 
just now, however, involves questions that air Far-reaching, and 
implicate at least the Governments of England, France, Ger- 
many and Russia. It is not denied in London, Paris or in St. 
Petersburg that the recent "understanding" between England. 
France and Russia had for its first purpose the restraining of the 
aggressive policies of Germany, or as it is put in Berlin Govern- 
ment circles, to "bottle up Germany.' 5 There is no doubt that 
England and France are playing diplomatically to circumvent 
Germany, nor is Germany ignorant of that fact, much less is 
the Kaiser idle. Since the tripartite between Russia, England 
and France was formed some weeks ago, a very derided pro-Ger- 
man sentiment has developed in Russia, and in some political 
quarters, especially in reactionist circles, an open demand is be- 
ing made upon the Czar to recall Count do Witte to the head 
of the foreign office. That would mean a Russo-Gcrman offen- 
sive and defensive alliance, and the annulment of the anti-Ger- 
man compact recently agreed upon between Nicholas, Edward 
and Follieres. Naturally, Germany is using her influence to the 
uttermost to have de Witte reinstated, the more so because he 
is not only the most popular man with the Russian masses, but 
he is pro-German. But in as much as the Revel conference be- 
tween Edward and Nicholas was authorized by Ibe British Par- 
liament, it is hardly to be supposed that the British Government 
would permit the Czar to reinstate de With 1 , and thus annul his 
compact with Edward and join with Germany as against France 
and England. The English people feel outraged at the sugges- 
tion, and there are mutterings all over the British empire to the 
effect that the time has about come when England should send 
her navy forward and utterly destroy Germany's sea power, as 
the only way to preserve (he peace of Europe. The anti-German 
spirit in France is ablaze because of the intrigues of. the Kaiser 
to have de Witte re-instated in the Russian Foreign Bureau, and 
break the tripple alliance, and should the Czar yield to German 
influence in the premises. Fiance and England would be forced 
to make war upon both Germany and Russia if for no reason 
other than to preserve their self-respect. On the other hand, 
the conservatives of Russia, as well as the majority of the Douma. 
know that an alliance with Germany would nullify the Revel 
agreement in the matter of "hands off," by France and England 
in any plans of Russia to absorb the more northern territory of 
Persia and invade Asia Minor. It is conceded in diplomatic cir- 
cles that leaving Russia and England out of the entanglement, 
it is going to take all the influence of the nations to keep France 
and Germany apart much longer. Public sentiment in France 
has about reached the point where the Government will have to 
go to war with Germany to wipe out the stain of the Franco- 
German war or give way to a new administration. The discovery 
of German intrigues to weaken, if not overthrow French author- 
ity in Morocco and Algeria, only adds fuel to the anti-German 
fibre in France; besides, the people know that France is now 
superior to Germany on the seas, and was never before in her 
history so thoroughly prepared to meet Germany on the land. 
Unless, therefore. Czar Nicholas has enough force of character 
to resist the pro-German sentiment and the influences that are 
being brought to bear upon him to place Count de Witte at the 
head of the foreign department, war will be inevitable, for 
neither Great Britain nor France would submit to such treachery 
as Russia and Germany would then be guilty of. 



The nations having agreed not to 
Persian Revolution. interfere with conditions in Persia, 

the Shah will have to depend on his 
army to restore law and order, which he will undoubtedly do. He 
camps with his soldiers, and leads them in person, which gives 
them courage and insures their loyalty. Be is himself B daring 
soldier and a General of a good ileal of ability. Moreover, the 
better class of his subjects approve ol his course in the present 
difficulties. He agreed that the nation should have a Parliament, 



July 4, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



13 



but the socialists and anarchists took advantage of the concession 
and tried to overthrow the Government by inaugurating a revo- 
lution that should end in a Government based upon the kind of 
pei ■ ■ 1 1 ; 1 1 liberty and property rights as arc in harmony with their 
political principles. Perhaps the greatest danger that confronts 
the Shah is the invasion of Southern Persia by Turkish regulars, 
who have seized the customs and tax stations and are collecting 
the revenues and forwarding them to the Turkish Government. 
Anyway, the Shah is so heartily disliked at home and abroad that 
the nation., have little or no inclination to give him aid and com- 
fort. 



(T 



All commerce entering Manchuria 
Japan Bulldozing. is supposed to be subject to what are 

called inland taxes, which go to the 
Chinese Government, but Japan has managed to so browbeat the 
Peking Government that the tax is suspended on all merchan- 
dise belonging to Japanese shippers and merchants. Of course, 
this is rank discrimination in favor of Japan, and it is not likely 
that the other nations will submit to the favoritism very long. 
To Japan, the tax which she saves by exemption is equal to a 
fair profit, thus enabling her merchants to undersell competitors 
and still have a good profit. China claims to be utterly unable 
to resist the exactions of Japan, and indirectly invites the mer- 
chants of other nations to petition their Governments to demand 
that the concession to Japan be condemned, and all commerce 
put on a parity. As the conditions under which goods and wares 
may enter the territory. Japan will soon have a monopoly of I lie 
entire commerce of Manchuria. 



The Russian Douma has passed a 
Of General Interest. resolution demanding that the Grand 

Dukes be eliminated from the man- 
agement of the nation's military and naval establishments, and 
from every bureau that is intrusted with the nation's defense or 
is charged with the expenditure of public funds under an im- 
plied threat that so long as they are identified in an official 
way with the conduct of the affairs of the Government the Par- 
liament will refuse to appropriate money for the maintenance 

of the Government. The federation of the several British 

possessions in South, Central and East Africa is still under dis- 
cussion in London, but no definite plan has as yet been submitted 

to King Edward. The rebels in Northwest India and their 

Afghan allies have yielded to British authority, and the "war" 

is over. The new Russian loan of $100,000,000 has not been 

opened for bids, as yet, and it is reported that the Dooms is 
likely to recall the authorization if the reactionists and the pro- 
German sentiment get the Czar's ear. 



1 1 CESSIBLE AT ALL TIMES. 
.San Francisco's great summer and winter resort, the Hotel Ra- 
fael, is meeting with great success under the management of 
mine host Orpin. Mr. Orpin has the requirements of guests at 
his fingers' ends, and he has made the Rafael one of the most 
popular of all hotels in the country. The Rafael possesses many 
advantages our other resorts, as it is so quickli i e from 

this city and Oakland, and because of the frequency of trains. 
Its grounds are so delightful, its sur- 

rounding scenery bo beautiful, that on as though brans- 

planted to another land, when visiting hero from the black fog 
ridden bay cities, ["he c is just tempered to a proper I 
the air is balmy with the scenl of millions of roses, and the trees 

ill in their green foliage. The menu at the I 
and at the hotel itself is in charge of a chef, who makes i; 
slant study, and the - any of the hotel 

palaces in New York. The rooms in the main building are all 
steam-heated, an i none that have not the advantage 

of a sun exposure. The casino is the delight of the automobilist. 
and Sunday is the day of i M nin county roads 

are among i the State. i the Rafael 

yearly attrai to the life in a 

to that in the main building. Th tter recom- 

mends the Rafael to all who woul fnl vacation sur- 

roundeo on, and yet sur- 

rounded by all that the pleasures the forest primeval may render 
to make a mortal happy. 



^v. 




ON THE OUTINGS 

of the season's sports, thousands will, 
under the heat and fatigue, feel the 
need of cheer and comfort. 



HUNTER 
WHISKEY 



THE PURE AND PERFECT 
STIMULANT 

will be first sought for Health and 
Hospitality, and it gives this hint— 
"Take a Dainty Hunter Julep" with 
its fresh and fragrant mint. 



Sold by .in Hrsl class ci indb lobben 

W.M. J.ANAHAN AS' , M,l. 



^ 



-4> 



FOB SALS. 
A bargain: Automatic addressing machine, cosl $350; Rem- 
ington No. 6. -Silo: 5, 

iO. Will be sold cheap, [f interested, see Mr. Powei 
16, 773 Market s 



The new Japan 

anese art now open in : nt Hotel. 



Judicious Purchasing 

of the material in your building means more 
profit on your investment. II Buy from us, as 
sales agents of California's best constructive 
materials, i Our quality is unsurpassed and 
San Francisco benefits by our prices. 9 It 
means money to you, whether owner, architect 
or contractor'. 

Oar Lines Comprise 

Cement— Standard Portland Cemen'. 
Santa Cruz Portland Cement. 

Lime — Holmes Lime Co., brands. 

Plaster— Marbleite Hardwall Plaster. 

Brick— Central Brick Co., Red and Repressed, 
Carnegie Brick and Pottery Co., Fire and 
Face Brick. Sewer Pipe and Terra Cotta. 

Crushed Rock— Good quality. "Blue Trap." 

WESTERN BUILDING MATERIAL CO. 

430 California St. ?•>•" Te-por.rr 2M7 San Francisco 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 4, 1908. 









nir ■ 



vm 



TNANCIAL 



'■' ■.■'-• r - : "ii!v 




G ' Pbospei cs 

fob the Future. 



The broker-; on Bush street have had 
to contend with dull times for many 
weeks past, and outside of the men 
who handle the business of the so- 
called "magnets" in control of the mines, there arc few who 
have made their salt in commissions for a long time. It is only 
natural, therefore, that they should drift into a common groove 
and pin their hopes upon better times after the midsummer holi- 
days are at an end. The vacation may do some good. For weeks 
previous to a season when business men seek relief from the sul- 
try heat of midsummer, filled with languor of mind and body, 
the disposition is lacking to engage in heavy enterprises of any 
kind or to branch out in their i ng igements. Revived by change 
of scene and air, they return after their sojourn in the mountains 
or by the seashore ready for a new campaign in improved health 
and spirits. That money is more plentiful here, piling up again 

in the banks i i extent which should, but will not, reduce the 

interest on loans to borrowers, is the report current on the street. 
It is questionable if this argues favorably for the market, al- 
though some believe that the swelling accumulations in banks 
must eventually result in an overflow to the mining market. On 
the other hand, there are others who argue that the swollen 
deposits are due in a large measure to the dullness in specula- 
tion, which turns the sayings of the people into the banker's 
vaults instead of into the wallets of the brokers. If the bankers 
could be induced to extend their loans on mining stocks as they 
did in the olden time, when bank stocks were esteemed as the 
choicest kind of collateral, and banks were started and run solely 
as an adjunct to the stock market, all would be well. But they 
are not so disposed now, which accounts in a large measure for 
the quiet times in the business. 

It is doubtless pleasant to recall under the circumstances the 
history of the past. To dream again of the happy day when the 
lights in the brokers' offices on Pine and California streets burned 
long after midnight into the wee stria' hours of the morning, and 
a re-inforced clerical staff struggled to bring the books up I" date 
and the balance struck on margin accounts, the interest on which 
at the regular rate- charged of one and one-half per cent being 
quite an item in a com mission broker's business. Then ore cut 
little or no feature in the game as it was played. The dear pub- 
lie was always ready to believe that there was a possibility for a 
strike to be made at any moment, and the manipulators saw to it 
that the fires of hope were kept burning brightly. That was 
their end of the game, and they played. Few of the people who 
frequented the streets, following every rumor of import, and 
the lead of "insid -. up and down the gamut, winn ag 

sometimes, at others losing, ever knew or dreamed of the multi- 
tudinous wire- operated in the system of manipulation, where 
what appeared on the surface to be a most ordinary, every-day 
business scheme was reduced to a science, where a series of com- 
plex ramifications were proof against disentanglement to which 
only a very few held the key. Manj old-time operators live in 
the belief that history will repeat itself in this respect. It may, 
as nothing seems impossible in this world, but it is very doubt- 
ful. Still, it is a comforting hope, and one which will appeal 
to every holder of shares which cost dollars and are now- selling 
in the cents. All of this class will join in the prayer that a 
plenteous harvest, bank accumulations, and generally prosperous 
conditions in business will tend to revive the mining businesB 
and bring about a new and lively era of speculation in shares of 
mines in all of the Nevada and California districts. 



The City of 
Churches Suffers. 



II is real mean of Uncle Sam to 
make such a dead set on Oakland — 
dear Oakland — always interfering 
through his mail officials with the 
good and enterprising people of that burg, who bury their heads 
in their prayers book on Sunday. while he. devise schemes to 
wheedle the delusive dollars out of their neighbors on Monday. 
The latest sufferer is the Oakland Transcontinental Power Com- 



pany, which has just been debarred from the use of the United 
Stales mails by a fraud order. This, following the arrest for 
fraud of the officers of the Oakland Transcontinental Aerial 
Telephone and Power Company, has served to check the ambition 
of others who have been prepared to use the mails as a dragnet 
to land a haul of suckers. These people, it is charged, led in- 
vestors to believe it had a commercially possible wireless tele- 
phone, and managed to dispose of considerable stock. It is al- 
leged that the apparatus shown visitors, which enabled them to 
talk from one room to another, is the limit of the capabilities 
of the system, and that the promoters were converting to their 
own u-c the proceeds of slock sales. The wiles of the Oaklander 
in full possession of his faculties are certainly like the way of 
Providence — inscrutable. 



Small Fish Ag.um 
the Victims. 



While the Oceanic Steamship Com- 
pany has defaulted again on its 
semi-annual interest of $60,125, due 
.July 1st. which, with the amount of 
interest defaulted in January last, makes an aggregate of in- 
terest now due of $120,250, there will be no foreclosure suit 
started. To avoid the necessity, a majority of the shares repre- 
senting the Spreckels family, and a irw other larger stockholders, 
have signed an agreement not to start any foreclosure suit dur- 
ing the year 1908. This bars any recalcitrant among the small 
fry from taking action, even if so disposed. This is. of course, 
not in accordance with the much-vaunted doctrine of equal- 
ity, while it argues again=t the principle which, in any sense of 
its application, is a fallacy. As a rule, however, the owner of ten 
shares in one of these big corporations is generally responsible 
for most of the disturbance when a chance oilers to annoy the 
management, on the same principle thai small dogs invariably 
make more noise than large ones. 



People who purchase "non-assess- 

Non-Assessable able stock oi companies incorporated 

Stock in Court. in outside States which claim to 

giant this privilege, which our legal 
commentators claimed legal, will do well to note the course of a 
case now on trial in Oakland. Peter M. Rasmussen invested, it 
is claimed, the sum of $26,000 in -lock of the Redding Gold and 
Copper Mining Company, incorporated under the laws of South 
Dakota. The stock issued was, it is further claimed, non-assesa- 
able. In face of this, the stock was advertised as delinquent for 
non-payment of assessments aggregating $40.3, and undoubtedly 
would have been sold had not the court interfered with an in- 
junction. The balance of the story remains to be told. It will 
interest many holders of this class of stock. 

E. B. Courvoisier, frame maker, 1374 Sutter street, bet. 

Van Ness and Franklin. Allow me to estimate on your regilding. 





HIGH GRADE 


INVESTMENT SECURITIES 




LIST ON REQUEST 




SUTRO & CO., Brokers 


TEL. K. 332 


412 MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



J. C. Wilson, Broker 



Member Stock and Bond Exchange. Stocks 
and Bonds, Investment Securities. 482 Cali- 
fornia St., San Francisco, Kohl Building. 
Telephone Kearny 815. 



Zadig & Co., Stock Brokers 

Tonopah, Goldfteld, Bullfrog, Manhattan, 
Comstock, Fairview and Rawhide Stocks. 
Have option on shares best Rawhide proper- 
ties for a few days only. 324 Bush Street. 



.Iriv !. 190S. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



15 



Chief of Police Biggy is to be < i 

Slot Machine Fraud. plimented for his effort to do away 

with the pernicious slot machine. 
This is one of the worsl evils of the day, and the sooner it is 
eliminated from the daily life of the clerk and the business man 
the better for the whole community. With many small boys, 
half-grown men, and with many men, it is but the first step to 
gambling on the races, the first rung of the ladder into the pit 
of hell. 

"Playing the machine" becomes a fad, an insanity, with many 
people. If the machine were square, it would not be half so bad, 
but bad enough, but when nearly every machine is so fixed that 
the player may not possibly win, it becomes a downright steal. 

The recommendations by the police captains should be made 
effective at once by the passage of an ordinance, and the owners 
and operators of machines should be arrested under the present 
law for operating devices to cheat and deceive, and later the 
machines may be prohibited altogether, as in Alameda. It was 
shown conclusively to the Grand Jury that the machines were 
crooked, and that they could be "fixed" by attaching the cylinders 
together and preventing the showing of a winning hand. Wc 
will have to confess an appalling powerlessness if the municipal- 
ity may not stop this thieving now that it is fully demonstrated 
by police investigation. The slot machine must go. 

Mayor Taylor's recommendation 
Collusion to Graft. that the collusion between the three 

printing firms who have been reap- 
ing a large profit from the city printing and binding be put a 
stop to has met with approval by all decent citizens. The Mayor 
is right, and there should be no countenance given any such 
tiiie\ ing processes. The firms mentioned started in on this kind 
of loot at the time that the villain Ruef. was in power, and they 
have kept it up ever since. It is with a great deal of pleasure 
that 1 lie public will note the action of the Mayor. 

It is an almost hopeless task to try 
In Otheh Likes. to clean the municipal Augean 

stables. A shaft of hope breaks the 
darkness when the Supervisors' committee reaches the buggies 
used in the municipal affairs, and there is a possibility that the 
said committee may finally attempt to clean the stalls. Lasl week 
action was taken by the committee to protect the small contrac- 
tors, and In break the collusion by which the larger linns grafted 
all of the business of buggy hire. The small owner will new gel 
a square deal, and another one of the City Hall pings is busted 
wide open. 



THE CASK OF JAMES TBEADWELL. 

The case of .lames Treadwell is to be brought up by the Dis 
trict Attorney's office nexl week. Mr. Treadwell is to 1" 
for various offenses no! yel made dear in the public prints. Mr. 
Treadwell is a well-known man in San Frai ifornia, 
and certainly a shining mark. His interests are many, and in 
nearly all of these he has been ! lie has. naturally. 
made manj enemies and many would profii by bis fall. His ac- 
tivities have extended in con xcinl, manufacturing and railroad 

circles, and he has unwittingly stepped on I rerj power- 

ful people. An efforl is uow being made to connect him with the 
down fall of the »'ali! - Deposit and i opany, 

and it is doubtful if these efforts will be successful. 



The inspection of sanitary conditions and the en- 

ncnt of the law in regard to the employment of child 
is new a function of local authority in the Has 

i en a persistent attempt to aggrandise departments 
or b\ creating new bureaus of mercantile inspection, w tli 

numerous inspectors and .1 

bureaus the duties regularly and properly performed b] 
health boards. While child lab n - ms un- 

ity to burden the State with another ornamental body in 
order, more than for any other reason, to furnish juicy berths for 
aspirants. In California, it i- insp 
child lab.- at unknown. 

departmei " emptors 

is lived as behin ndows, and un 

supervision of the great and many-eyed public itself. T 

contrast to the - nt in New York. I 'i 

some if the J 

metropolis. 




"(Hunt." Santa Crut Big Trees. 

Santa Cruz is one of the most favored localities adjacent 

tei San Francisco for those who love to pass the vacation time in 
proximj ocean and revel in surf bathing. The Big Trees 

are an additional attraction. The Big Tree Grove is easily reached 
by a good wagon or by rail, in a few minutes, from any of Santa 
( Yuz's fine hotels. 



r 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK 

316 MONTGOMERY STREET 
San Francisco, Cal. 


Authorized Capital - - 

Paid Up Capital - 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 


- - $1,000,000.00 

- - - - 500,000.00 

313,000.00 


Interest at Jk 


per cent 


the rate of "Jl 


per annum 


was paid on deposits for six months 


ending June 30, 1908. 


DIRECTORS: WM. BABCOCK, S. L. ABBOTT, O. D. 
BALDWIN. JOSEPH D. GRANT, E. J. McCUTCHEN, L. F. 
MONTEAGLE. R. H. PEASE. WARREN D. CLARK, JAS. L. 
FLOOD, FRED W.RAY, JOHN PARROTT, JACOB STERN. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 
g 

annum 

,»n Ml) 

try. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 4, 1908. 




MILADY'S THOUGHTS. 

When wit.is rampant and the clash of repartee 
Is dazzling as it blends in rhythmic interchange, 
Milady sits before the gathered guests and smiles. 

i 
Her messages ar; couched in wondrous melody, 
Her hearers, gazing, stop enthralled, and then some strange 
Bewildering power prompts a pause — her look beguiles. 

Anticipation, wonder, doubt, you see 
Engraved upon the faces within range ; 
The thought of promised pungent wisdom past us file?. 
Alas for human hopes, discern your courage flee. 
She speaks. No rhyme nor reason flows, but plain 
Oration sung with sombre face, discloses thought quite com- 
monplace. 

* * * 

Now that Lieutenant Fryer has carried off his wife (Miss En- 
gracia Crichter) the wide world over, the seven seas across, 
society has lost its only interpreter of the poetry of motion. 
There are other girls who can cake-walk, or pirouette in the 
privacy of a drawing room, but Miss Crichter was the only girl 
who could be depended on to do her stunt wherever and when- 
ever sweet charity or the desire of friends prompted her. Only 
a few nights before her marriage, she did a Spanish dance for 
a charity fete at the Fairmont, with all the grace and abandon 
of a Rose of the Rancho. Miss Constance de Young has a pretty 
knack of illustrating her songs with a dance, but she never gives 
a dance without a song as a pretext. The dance, which she does 
in wooden shoes in the petticoat song from Miss Hook of Hol- 
land, is as clever as anything one could see on the professional 
stage. But as I said before, Miss Crichter was the only girl who 
used the dance itseif as the peg on which she hung her parlor 
tricks. Let us hope that some other girl will develop talented 
toes, and step into her shoes, for society should do its share 
toward keeping San Francisco's world-wide reputation in that 
line. 

It is really an interesting fact that the two most talked of 
dancers of to-day should both hail from San Francisco — Isadora 
Duncan and Maud Allen. The latter's identity with Maud 
Durant has been proven without a doubt. Both of these girls 
belong to the same barefoot school of dancing called the "classic." 
In a recent letter to friends in this city, Miss Edith Livermore 
writes that it is a singular fact that Miss Allen's "Salome" dance 
has been forbidden in Berlin, though it has created such a furore 
in London. On the other hand, London never grew wildly en- 
thusiastic over Berlin's idol — Isadora Duncan. A satirical cari- 
cature in a German weekly shows a baron leaning toward a 
classic danseuse who has just come from the stage flushed with 
her great success. "My dear young lady," he says to her, as 
he stoops to kiss her hand, "you are indeed the greatest dancer of 
your time. You cannot only dance Beethoven and Chopin, but 
you can actually waltz !" 

The same satirical comment might be applied to the ballroom 
dancing of the day. The vogue of the two-step has pushed all 
the other old favorites, including the waltz, to the wall. The 
two-step becomes more solemn every season, until it is really a 
spiritless affair. The girl who is considered the best dancer in 
the Greenway set glides very gracefully, to be sure, but in her 
slow, studied movements, there is nothing akin to the merry old- 
fashioned dance. A cynical observer might say: "You are indeed 
the greatest dancer that ever came out of Burlingame. You can 
dance as mechanically as though you were wound up !" 

Apropos of dances, I hear that the officers of the fleet have de- 
cided upon that method of returning the hospitality offered by 
society, and when the fleet is augmented by the sister ships bound 
for this port, every night of the week will go dancing down the 
calendar, with one ship or another acting as steward of the 
gayeties. June always goes out trailing orange blossoms behind 
her, and as a result, the perfume of July seems a bit flat. But 



this year we have the ships to brace us, and instead of using July 
as a month to lay away faded enthusiasms in the lavender of 
country lanes, the girls are sure to make frequent trips to town. 

This week the scent of the orange blossom still lingers pleas- 
antly in the air, for on the very last day of the month — Tues- 
day — there was a continual performance of wedding bells. Evi- 
dently there was a determined and concerted action to get under 
the wire in time and go down in history as June brides. The 
wedding of Miss Gertrude Josselyn and Gerald Eathbone was a 
high noon affaii, resplendent with bridesmaids and all the 
trimmings that go to make a fashionable wedding. Gertrude is 
generally conceded the prettiest of a large family of attractive 
girls, and in her beautiful wedding robes, with her wonderful 
golden-red hair flashing under her veil, she was as charming a 
bride as this or any other season record?. Myra Josselyn, who is 
still a school girl, was maid-of-honor, and the bridesmaids in- 
cluded two other sisters, Marjorie and Mary Josselyn, Elena 
Robinson, Maud Bourn. Margaret Newhall and Emily Wilson 
completed the list of attractive bridesmaids. 

In the evening, Miss Irene Muzzy became the bride of Mr. 
Albert Lansburg. Their romance began in Paris, while both 
were students, and survived all the vicissitude? of the gayeties 
of the French capital. It was a very quiet home .wedding. 

On that same evening, a very pretty wedding was solemnized in 
Berkeley, when Miss Bertine Wollenberg became the bride of Mr. 
John Alfred Wilcox, a prominent young mining engineer. Miss 
Wollenberg is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Wollenberg, 
who were prominently identified with the early day history of 
Arizona, but who now make their home in the college town. Mr. 
Wilcox calls Portland his home, though his college career was at 
the University of California, and he has spent much of his boy- 
hood in the household of his step-grandmother. Mrs. Eleanor 
Martin. 

Two interesting engagements have been announced this week. 
Miss Sarah Dram's betrothal to Mr. Gill of Redlands came as a 
genuine surprise to society, for Miss Drum was supposed la be 
wedded to various interesls that do not include matrimony. She 
was the first society girl in San Francisco to drive her own 
machine, and, indeed, when she took up the sport, the automobile 
had not yet made a great inroad in popular favor. 



KITCHEN SPECIALS 



To introduce our new Kitchen- 
ware Department on the gallery, 
we will offer some extraordinary 
values in genuine Agateware. 
We now have the largest Kitchen- 
ware Department in the City, 
filled with a great variety of labor- 
saving devices. J* <2* 



NATHAN DOHRMANN COMPANY 



1520-1550 VAN NESS AVE. 






July -I, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



17 



The other engagement announcement, to balance accounts, 
brings a Southern' girl into the reckoning with a San Francisco 
man in the leading role. Miss Louise < ooper of Santa Barbara 
has announced her engagement to Mr. Hewitt Davenport. Mr. 
Davenport is a son of Mrs. Elizabeth Davenport, and a brother 
of Miss Elenoi Davenport. The wedding will be celebrated in 
autumn. 

Mr. C. 6. Conn, who arrived al the St. Francis some days ago, 
is well known as a millionaire manufacturer, whose output of 
cornets is the largest in the world; but he has just achieved a 
feat which places him high in the ranks of automobile enthu- 
siasts. Mr. Conn, who is seventy years of age, and drives his 
own American Simplex machine, has just completed a run across 
half the continent — from Elkhart, Indiana, to California. In 
the course of his trip he was snowbound and delayed by washouts 
and endless adventures of the sort that lure the hardy motorist to 
his peril. 

The work on the new Palace Hotel on the old Market street 
site, is progressing rapidly. A trifle less than one hundred days 
were consumed from the time when the first steel beam was placed 
in position until the frame was complete. Since then the pro- 
gress has been very rapid. Floor after floor has been laid, and 
now the while stone facing is beginning to be placed on the Mar- 
ket street side. It is the expectation of the Palace Hotel Com- 
pany to have this famous hostelry ready for their guests at the 

earliest rj eiit. and no efforts have been spared to accelerate the 

work. 

Mr. and Mrs. 0. H. Crocker came over from Belvedere an 
evening or so ago to see Margaret Illington's finished perform- 
ance in "The Thief." They remained for a few days at the 
St. Francis. 

No one would think, to judge by the continuity of the dinners 
and luncheons and teas that are constantly being given at the 
Fairmont that the midsummer season was here. In spite of the 
fact that this is the season in which many folks are in their coun- 
try homes, there is a constant movement from the country to the 
Fairmont for a few- days ami then back again. There have been 
any number of beautiful dinners given in the past fortnight. 
Chief among these were those of the Frederick Sharons, Miss 
Maud Bourn, Mrs. H. M. A. Miller, Mrs. Crocker, Colonel Kirk- 
patrick. 

Mr. and Mis. A. M. Rosenbaum, of San Francisco, and their 
sons. A, M. Rosenbaum, jr., and Milton A. Rosenbaum, are at 
Del Monte for the summer months. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph \\ ittman, Miss Wittman and Miss Ker- 
rigan, are guests of the St. Francis, The Wittmans have a beau- 
tiful home in Morristown, N. J., where some of our exclusive 
families have enjoyed their delightful hospitality. 

Among the guests of the Fairmont from the Southern part of 
the State arc Orlan Morgan, E. li. Baldwin, W. W. 

and wife, .1. s Kayes and wife, all of Los \u- lee ; B. < 

ling and wife of Hollands; Mrs. C. I'. Von Gerichten o S 
Diego; Charles P. Austin of Santa Barbara. 

The quality of the dramatic season i l by the presence 

;it the Hole] St. Francis jusl now of Margaret I lington, Sirs. 
Fiske. Ileim Miller, i ' ! i . i : ■ ! ■■• i tlesey. 

Mr. Frobman, whose dictum in theatrical circles, prom- 

ises one of the most brilliin A attractions San Francisco 

has evei 'He 

Charles M. \ a\ and M re. Mc\ - ickli J . Pa., ai 

ing a tour of the Coast, and are Mopping at the Fairmont during 
fcheii stay in San Francisco. 

from abroad a tnes the moans and groans i>( the hotel and 
iship men he ivel is tun 

-i — from tin ither side of the Atl.i 

iea which - Atlantic 

to i he Pacific. 

I 
the Baron and Baroness Preuschen and their friend. Herr Von 
Shubert, registering from Washington. P. C. Baron IV 
is the naval attache to the German Embassy, and the party who 
'he southern part of the State wont from 
3 in Francisco. 
The usual contingent of visiting army and navy officers are 
at the Fairmont ban last wovk. for the time 

_. and the bus;: 
who are here are Rear 
3. 0. 

THE STAR HAIR REMEDi tonic; restore* color to gray 

hair; stops falling, cures dandruff; grows new hair. All druggists. 




Oil for Both Sides 
Of the Cylinders 



Upon perfect lubrication ///side the 
cylinders depends the very life of 
your automobile. Outside the cylin- 
ders, on other parts of the automobile, 
it's unly a question of wear. Lubrica- 
tion in either case is made a scientific 
certainty by the use of ZEROLENE, thenew 
carbon proof, friction-proof, troubfe-pioof oil. 

ZEROLENE Oil 



is a new product, produced in 
only one place in the world. It 
has the new property of being 
non-carbonizing; gives perfect 
results in the cylinder of any 
gasoline engine of any type. 

ZEROLENE is put up in sealed 
cans with patent spout that can- 
not be refilled. Also put up in 
barrels for the garage trade. Sold 
by dealers everywhere. 

STANDARD Oil COMPANY 

I Incorporated) 




W. McGowan, B. F. Canaga, F. 8. Wiltse, N. C. Martin, all of 
whom wear the uniform of the navy. 

The banquet held at the St. Francis the other evening to 

honor the twenty-fourth anniversary of the famous Greelej 

party brought togethei a number of rerj interesting characters 

among them being Admiral Sebree and Emory, Colonel Brainerd, 

Maurice ConneU and Mr Tayior. Admiral Emory commanded 

the steamer BeaT thai lefl the relief expedition; Admiral Sebree 
was executive officer on the Thetis, and Mr. Taylor was quarter- 
r of the Thetis. 
Mrs. Sidney Liebes and Miss Fleishman have gone to Del 
Monte, whore the] are - tried for the summer months. 



Buy your fireworks for out-of-town use from California 

Fire Works Company, al same old place. 219 Front street. 



The high art J 'libit in the Marsh's new .1 

1 airmont, is well worth a visit. 




Palo Alfo Planing Mills 
I 

Our Specialties: 
HARDWOOD INTERIORS 

VENEERED DOORS 

Estimates cheerfully furnished 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE : 
1105 CHRONICLE BLDG. 



For Sale 

A BARGAIN 

Automatic Addressing Machine, Cost $350.00 
Remington No. 6 - - 115.00 

5000 Stencils - - - 7.50 

Sundries - 50.00 

$522.50 

WILL BE SOLD CHEAP 
it interested see Mr. Power, Room 16, 773 Market Street, San Francisco 



IS 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 4, 190ft. 



ANITE 




We met at the corner of Fourteenth and Washington streets 
in Oakland last week. I knew in an instant that he was a 
stranger. How? Well, by the peculiar look on his face. To 
be more particular, by the distended appearance of his nostrils. 

"Pardon me," he said, as he stepped close to me, "but isn't it 
rather unusual for the city authorities i" allow a Boap works, or 
an acid factory, in the heart of the retail district?" 

-I should say so ! I have lived in Oakland a good many years, 
however, and I must confess that if you have found such things 
in existence in the heart of the retail district, I admit that it is 
news to nil','' I replied. 

"What!" lie exclaimed. "Do you mean to tell me there is no 
Boap works or acid factory near here?" 

"Not to my knowledge." 

■'Then kimllv tell me, if you can, what is this offensive odor 
which I smell?" 

"That," I replied, "is the mixture of corned beef, cabbage 
and strong disinfectant that pours out of the city prison, fills 
the air in the Mayor's office and the headquarters of the various 
other city officials witli its 'delightful fragrance,' and permeates 
tic atmosphere for hlock? around with an aroma akin In thai 

which Hoats away from a glue factory." 

* * * 

It was just before the bailiff rapped for order in the criminal 
department of the Superior Court of Alameda County one day 
la-'t week. The clerk was busily engaged at his desk, when his 
attention was attracted to a Portuguese who stood in front of 
him. 

"Meester," he asked, "is my frien' Sho, goin' git sen'ence 
thees mor'n?" 

"I guess he is, unless the judge forgets," was the answer. 

''How much you theenk he goin' git?" questioned the Por- 
tuguese. 

"Life," was the impatient response of the clerk. 

"Santa Maria!" exclaimed the astonished Portuguese. "I 

don' theenk he leeve that long." 

* * * 

The opponents of the Stanford faculty were able to mass just 
twenty-four votes at the recent annual alumni association meet- 
ing at the university. Some dire threats were made that terrible 
exposures of faculty perfidy and incompetency by the leaders 
of this same twenty-four before the test vote on sustaining the 
faculty was taken; but when the pigmy showing was made, there 
was a silence that showed that the controversy which has dis- 
turbed the university for months past is at an end. The young 
men of convivial habits at the university must keep themselves 

within the lines of decency. 

* * • 

There are several hundred office holders of the old adminis- 
tration in San Jose who would be pleased to have the way for 
them carefully bridged into the new administration. 

* * » 

Dr. Ewald Flugel, of Stanford, reports the "Letter A" of 
his great Chaucer Dictionary ready for the press. Dr. Flugel 
has undertaken a gigantic and monumental work. He has al- 
ready toiled seventeen years, and expects ten more to elapse 
before he sees the volumes done. Definitely, he is annotating 
and giving tin' meaning and history of every word used in the 
poetry of Geoffroy Chaucer, the English poet; ami net only this, 
lie illustrates the use of each word by extracts. This product 
of lit. FlugePs brain has been made possible by Stanford univer- 
sity and by the Carnegie Institution, Washington, D. C, both 
of which are hacking the work. 

* * • 

That bit of roadway between Alameda and Elmhurst is still in 
a deplorable condition. What's the matter with the country 
authorities. About $18(i,000 is collected by the county from 
Alameda city yearly, and nothing is given in return. 



Ulargarpt SUtngtott-An ilmpreaBum 

ly Stllrc (&lgtm 



Margaret lllingtoii! There was a sort of human smack to 
the name, as it were, to make one strangely desirous of meeting 
the woman. A kind of half-way sound between tears and laugh- 
ter, it seet 1 — a note struck out of the night somewhere, yet 

with the hope of a morning in it: the printed letters of the two 
word- fusing 111 their impression into firelight vistas of home 
things peculiarly poignant. 

Surely such interest had to be satislied. And there she wa- 
in, 1 b lore me in the simplesl of white gowns, the most gracious 
of manners, her brown eyes radiant one moment, the next just 
a little horrified at the -nnh a dramatic editor had dared to ad- 
minister, then an instant later admitting perhaps he was quite 
right. Such impulsiveness, such naive ingenuousness — an in- 
genuousness that leans at you in its eagerness of expression, and 
is infinitely girlish ami also beautiful. No, not exactly the Mar- 
garet tiling you expected to meet, and yet such a Margarel 

lllingtoii --I much Herself thai you would not have her dif- 
ferent. 

Looking at her. 1 i- chow could not help hut think of Bar- 

rie's heroine in "The Little Minister." There was that in the 
charming vivacity of the fare, in the round, linn chin, that car- 
ried no dimple, the teeth that Hashed smiles between the twitch 
of red lips, and the free, roving eyes. The same touch of impul- 
sive daring and winsomeness under the seal of a true, line woman- 
hood, big in its temperamental dimensions. 

It is because of that womanh I she impresses you most. "i on 

have not Been her ait. perhaps, hut you believe in her then ami 
there. She is so many things — so many — sometimes she doesn't 
know which one herself; but she is American and practical in 
all of them. It is another way of saying she has range and en- 
ergy. With these, what may a woman of beauty not accomplish 
in any field whatever ! 

So she works ami dreams of bigger things still, and Daniel 
Frohman, her husband-manager, working with her too, and im- 
mensely practical, smiles down at her from his Van Dyke beard, 
his lean grace, and, in the musing way a man alwa;. 
such a woman. 



Is there anything that E. I'. E. Troy will not muddle up 

or butt in on ? 



Th" diminution in accidents since Biggy began raiding the 
scorchers is an evidence of the fact that the chief was right. En- 
force the laws and you cannot go very far wrong. 



Buy your fireworks for out-of-town use from California 

Fire Works Company, at same old place, 219 Front street. 



TAFT & PENNOYER 



Close-Out Sale of Black Suitings 

A selection el Imported aoveltj Bull lengths; in black only; wool 
anil wool i VOluea up te (36 — NOW $19.00 SUIT. 



Wash Goods Specials 



floral effects, stripes, 

na -mi, i ,',,! 



Entire line ,,r Imported Prem b Ifollee I] 
el ks, solid colors; all this season's pa"'* 

value -SPECIAL AT 35c. YARD. 

INDIA DIMITIES— white and colored grounds, dots, dainty 

floral patterns, etc.- -■•■ : -SPECIAL 15c. YARD. 

wash taffetas in checks and plaids; llghl nines, pinks, i ins, 
browse black I white; .'.",■'. value SPECIAL 20c. YARD. 

COTTON SUITINGS— wash popullns. voiles, etc.; plain colors, 
checks, mercerized and linen effects; 25c. to - lies— SPECIAL 

20c. YARD. 

PRINTED BATISTE — while anil colored meenC: ln^. 
ment. 15c. value — SPECIAL 10c. YARD. 

Fancy Silk—Special ?5c Yard 



A gouii assortmi a 
nf colors; correct for 



if Kuhl 
pretty afti rno 



21 inch 
r dress 



s wide, complete iii" 
■s; regular $i 



BROADWAY AT 14th ST. OAKLAND 



■ Ui,\ I, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



in 




TWO. 

The rain is falling steadily 
Prom leaden sky to leaden sea : 
In all the earth and sea and sky 
No soul's alive but you and I. 

No living soul but 1 — and you ! 

The broad earth curves between us two, 

Yet you to me are dearer much 

Than those whom now my hands can touch. 

So you and I are quite alone, 
Save for the rain's dull monotone, 
Its quivering network on the sea — 
But, ah, my Love, come close to me ! 

— Dorothea Mackellar in Appleton's Magazine. 



ASPIRA TION. 



You are so fair, you do not seem 

Of flesh and blood, but of the misl 
Along some river moonlighl kissed 

Which flows between the Isles of Dream. 

You are so cold, so still, so far. 

That when across the breathing night 
I reach out blindly for your light) 

I dream that I have clutched a star. 

You are so dear, so much a part 

Of all I do, and feel anil think, 

I stand upon the awful brink 
Of Space between — and break im heart. 

— Freda 'a!,- Truesdell fa Applet on' i 



FAIRYLAND. 



Where doth it smile in its mystical glory, 

Kissed by the waves of uiui murmuring 
Under what stars rise its headlands so hoary, 

Fanned by the wing of some dream-laden breeze? 
Shines it afar in the realm id' the sunset. 

Tower and bastion with pennons unfurled? 
Or doth it gleam where the pathway ol BiWer 

Ends in the moon at the rim of the world? 

— .l/»n/ Elizabeth Killiiee. 



A OARDR& PR IYER. 

That ur v, JUL 1 .- and oi < irth must li 

Thou knewest, \11.1h. and didst gram us bread; 

Yea — and 1. oar souls — didst give 

Us food id' tl" hallowed. 

— Thomas Walsh in Harper's Bator. 



OBITUARY. 



The San Francisco insurance worl 
most experts. Gordon M. 9 
quiei Gordon M. Stolp has _ us. He died .>i 

at his residence in Oakland. Mr. Stolp was connected with the 
insurani if San Francisco and the 1 

of eighteen years, anil no man stood higher in the estimation .>f 
noral public or his confreres in the profession. Mr. 9 
1 Elk and a Mason, and he took an active interest in all 

fraternal affairs. He had been >i ed with the insurance 

business for thirty-li 



Marsh's (formerly of Palace Hotel and i 

have opened at corner of California and Polk street. 



—Comment is being made as to wh\ the Alameda citj au- 
thorities have allowed bills to be passed paying for repairs on the 
Webster street, roadway before thai thoroughfare 1- completed. 

Only one side of the streel is finished, and the slreei has leu 

yet been accepted, and yet bills have been paid for "repairs." 

Isn't it about time that the public rise up and lake notice ol' the 
little lapses from regular routine thai lakes place every little 
while in Alameda and that cost the city money. 



THE VERY LAST DROP 

of Weinliard Portland Beer is 
precious to the thirsty man, for 
he knows a good thing and is 
not going to let any go to 
waste. Why it's good is easily 
explained. Good malt and hops, 
good intelligent brewing, good 
and skillful care while it's ri- 
pening, and good, clean, sani- 
tary bottling. In plain words, 
it is good, honest beer. 

Guaranteed under the Pnre Food 
and Drag Act. 

All connoisseurs drink Wein- 
hard Portland Beer. It is the 

delicious brew served at Bismarck Cafe, Cafe Francisco, The Louvre, 
Tait's and other leading cafes. Be Wise, Drink it at Home. 




CALIFORNIA BOTTLING CO. 

Bottling Agents 
1255 Harrison Street, San Francisco 

Phone Market 977 



Carnegie Brick and Pottery Co . 

M. A. MURPHY, General Manager. 

Vitrified Brick, Paving Brick, Fire Brick, Fire Tile, Fire Clay, 

Dust, Drain Tile, Acid Jars, Acid Pipes, Acid Bricks. 

Architectural Terra Cotta, Hollow Tile Ftre-Proofflng. Semi-Dry 
Pressed Brick, Terra Cotta Chimney Pipe, Brick and Tile Mantels, 
Flue Linings. Urns and Vases, Flower Pots. All kinds of Vltrlfled 
Salt-Glazed Sewer Pipe. 

Factory: Tesla, Alameda County. Cal. Vards: San Francisco, 
Oakland. Berkeley, San Jose. 

Office — 10th and Division Sts., San Francisco. 



Emmons Draying & Safe Moving Co. 

Telephone Temporar. 438 Market Street 

We move Safes, Machinery, Office Furniture and Fixtures 



Millbrae Kennels millbrae. calif 




: and San Mj 
Millbrae; backed b> ien square miles ot he-iiher TrelJs where ihe J"gs are 
exercised twice daily. 
Supervised by G. S. Haiiwelt irl breed and sell blft) 

Terriers and Bull D 
l! vr»u wfsb 10 board, buv or breed a g'X>d dog call or write 

THE MDU.BR.AE KENNEL CO. 



Offk» 



-Room 210. Cochrane anj B . 



■r. Bush. 



80 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 4, 1908. 




VOTOMLE 



y~x 



While the dealers are hieing themselves to the mountains, the 
owners of Mitchell ears will he heading for the sea. the occasion 
being the Second Annual Mitchell Jubilee, given under the aus- 
pices of the Mitchell Motor Car Company, through the local 
agents. Osen & Hunter, to those who possess a Mitchell automo- 
bile. Money ] as not been spared in the preparations for the 
event, and taking last year as a criterion, nothing but pleasure 
i? in store for those who participate. Yesterday afternoon, a 
hill-climb was programmed for Alum Bock hill, at San Jose. 
Here the owners of Mitchell cars congregated From all sections 
of the State. The evening was spent in the Garden City, and 
this morning, under the leadership of Secretary Rogers of the 
Mitchell Company, who is West for the event, with Osen and 
Hunter as able lieutenants, the run to the sea commences. Down 
through Gih'oy, the quaint town of San Juan, up over Ihe noted 
grade of the same name, and into the Salinas Valley, thence 
-nuth westward through pretty roads, the ride led, until suddenly 

burst into view the gates of Del Monte, that well-gtr ed hos- 

telry, that it is ever a pleasure to visit. Here, the owners of the 
Mitchell ears will hold high carnival around the festal board, 
as guests of those who. miles away, appreciate the good fellow- 
ship that has sprung up among the members of what lias now 
become known as the Mitchell Family. Here, Old Glory will 
wave, the eagle screetch. and the last hours of the day pass into 
history amidst the bursting and booming of rockets and other 
pyrotechnical display. The Mitchell Family will have as guests 
[heir brethren in the sport of automobiling, the members of the 
Santa Clara County Automobile Club. It will be a love feast 
from start to finish. The enthusiastic discussions of the ad- 
vantages of one's car over that of another, which at times is pro- 
ductive of heated conversations, will not use up the time. Mit- 
chell owners, because they are Mitchell owners, will agree on 
the points of construction, lubrication, ignition and the many 
other debatable points. Their opinions will all be right, and 

none will be wrong. 

* * * 

The fight between the American Automobile Association and 
the Automobile Club of America, goes merrily on. The latter. 
to try and strengthen its position, has made overtures to the 
Chicago Automobile Club, one of the powerful motor car organi- 
zations of the 1'nited States. These overtures have been turned 
down in an unanimous resolution, in which the Club ha- de» 



cTWONOGRAM OILS 

ARE BEING USED BY THE 

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 
AUTOMOBILES and MOTOR LAUNCHES 



Pacific Coast Distributors 

Geo. P. Moore Co. 



721 Golden Gate Ave. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



clined to withdraw from 'he American Automobile Association, 

the recognized national body of the United States. 

* * * 

It has been announced by the Royal Automobile Club of the 
United Kingdoms that arrangements are being made for another 
series of dust trials on Brooklands Track, to take place earlj 
this coming month. It has been urged that previous trials have 
resulted in no marked improvement, in as much as ears still 
raise as much dust as ever. If the trials are held, there will be. 
as last year, three classes, consisting of one for manufacturers' 
standard cars, one for amateur cars — that is. inter-club competi- 
tion — and one for experimental ears. The rules and regulations 
will be the same as last year, except thai the prize in the inter- 
club competition will be decided on the performance of the team 

entered by a club, and not on the best individual car. eacl l- 

peting club to enter a team of two cars. It has 1 n suggested 

that the clubs intending to enter a team shall hold preliminary 
trials, so as to enter their best cars. In the inter-club i peti- 
tion, cars will be run, as last year, strictly as they run on the 
road. The experimental cars will be tested on the following 
day, or some day thereafter, and any experimental devices are 
welcomed. Several inventions were brought out last year, ami 
it is expected that the number of experimental cars will be 
greater this year. No theory has yet been evolved as to what 
constitutes an ideal car in this respect, but there is no doubt but 
that if trials are persisted in and records are carefully taken, an 
accumulation of knowledge will result in the building up of a 
sound theory. Already certain general rules have been formu- 
lated, such as a sufficient clearance between the car and the 
ground, and a clean under-run, with the absence of under-slung 
tanks. 

* * * 

Four 1909 models of the Stevens-Duryea touring cars have 
arrived at the salesrooms of the Pacific Motor Car Go. The 
beautiful lines of these new models, as well as the many improve- 



It Pays to Know the AUTOCAR 




MODEL XIV ROADSTER 



Walter C. rJTWorris 

WESTERN DISTRIBUTOR 

550 Golden Gate Avenue, San Francisco 



July 4, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



31 



ments, including magneto. larger wheel base, etc., have at- 

: ted much attention, and is well worth a visit, etc. 

* » * 

George W. Richards, sun and party, reached Tonopah on June 

Id nt'ter a delightful trip from San Francisco in an Autocar 

touring car. No trouble was had with either engine or tires 

en route. The trip was taken over the mountains to Santa Cru ; 

and Del Monte, thence to Los Angeles and through Death Val- 
ley to their home. Mr. Richards reports the roads in fair con- 
dition, and states that the trip is one of the finest and most 
interesting to he taken in the West. 

* * * 

Mr. William M. Klinger, manager of the automobile depart- 
ment of the Fireman's Fund, has left for Salt Lake City on an 
inspection trip through Nevada and Utah. 

* * * 

Mr. Frank Johnson, owner of a big seven-passenger 6-cylinder 
touring ear. which was destroyed by fire in his private garage in 
Sun Rafael last Sunday evening, reports that on Monday morn- 
ing he had received the full amount of insurance carried on same 
in the auto department of the Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 

That's the wav to place insurance. 

* * * 

The visiting fleet has made especially busy times at the Geo. 
P. Moore Company's headquarters, as this company has recently 
undertaken the representation of the entire lubricating line of 
the New York Lubricating Oil Co., manufacturers of the famous 
"Monogram Oils." so well known to the experienced autpmo- 
bilist and motor-boat enthusiast. Monogram Oils have been 
placed on the market by the Columbia Lubricants Co., of New 
York, which was a subsidiary concern organized by the New York 
Lubricating Oil Co. for the purpose of handling the Monogram 
Line. Recently, however, the Columbia Lubricants Co. have been 
consolidated with the parent concern. 

When asked as to the new departure, Mr. George Moore said : 
"Yes, we have been having a strenuous time since the fled his 
been here, as we have been furnishing about 90 per ceni of the oil 
to them. We have been especially gratified at having the Gov- 
ernment accept our Monogram Oil for use in their motor 
launches, and feel that the use of this oil by the Government is 
a tribute to the superiority of the Monogram Oils I'm 
lubrication. Of course, wc have represented the Columbia 
Lubricants Co. of New York- Eor about sis years, bill since the 
consolidation with the parent COmp inv, We new lime lie the entire 
line of stationary and marine as well as the automobile oils." 

Monogram Oils, from the unrefined crude to the finished lubri- 
cant, are purely a product of the refinery of the New York Lubri- 
cating Oil Co.; they are manufactured especially for automobile 
and motor boat lubrication, are old only under the name of 
"Monogram," and are being delivered to Ihr publ nt dis- 




Correct, Summer 
Auto Attire For 
Men and Women 



"Everything for the motorist but the motor car"— Dust 
cents for men and women, pUin and trimmed: hats, caps: 
thernio bottles, lunch nd tire and regulation 

trunks, etc.. etc. 

SOLE AGENTS FOR HAWKEYE REFRIGERATOR TRUNKS 

i 



Van Ness 
at. Bush 



R.OOS BROS. 



OTarrell 
at Fillmore 



Pope-Hartford 

Automobiles 



AH Motordom acknowledges 
that it is the "King of Hill Climb- 
ers;" a car of great power, speed 
and quietness, maximum flexi- 
bility, and, above all, absolutely 
the most reliable motor car in the 
world. 



Consolidated Motor Car Co. 

S. G. CHAPMAN, Manager 

406 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

Telephone Franklin 3910. 



tributors for the < Co. only. 

* * * J 

A party of motorists thai arrived al Del Monte on Saturday, 
ing the following day, included Mr. and Mrs. I.. A. Wolff, 
Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Porter, Mr. and Mrs. F. s. Loop, and Mr. 
and Mrs. 11. II. Blanding. 



All that is Best in Motor Car Construction 

PACKARD 




'OS TOURING CAR 

CADILLAC 




5 P.ue.tftr. 4 C.I. S 1530.00 
10-B. P. R...bo.t, I 950 10-H. P. To.r(. s C.r J850 




453 Golden Gate Ave. 



San Fr 



'.'•> 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 4, 1908. 



Automobile Output ■ 572. 

At both the meeting of the association of licensed automobile 
manufacturers and the national association of automobile manu- 
facturers in New York, the outlook for this was freely discussed. 
M. .r. Bullions, general manager of the licensed association, when 
seen after the meeting, was emphatic in his conclusions that if 
the general policy of conservatism, coupled with rational business 
methods and a proper commercial practice were adhered to, the 
business for 1908 would not only equal but be larger than that 
of 1907. The records and statistics for 1907, which have just 
been completed by the licensed association, show to what extent 
the industry has grown the last year or two. During the fiscal 
year of January 1. 1907-January 1, 1908. there were 17,302 
pleasure gasoline ears manufactured in this country. The aggre- 
gated value is $96,169,572. During this same period there were 
5,000 steam and electric pleasure vehicles built and sold in this 
country, with a total value of 87,500,000, this giving a total of 
52,302 pleasure automobiles sold in the past 12 months, with a 
total value of $105,669,572. 

The percentage of increase each year has been consisteni as 
shown from statistics gathered in 1904, which shows the vahi 
the total output, $»6,645,064, a- against $105,669,572 for the 
present year. 

* * * 

Over seventy mile- an honr for a distance of- nearly live hun- 
dred miles is the killing pace that will have to be maintained to 
equal the performance of the winner of last year's Freneh Grand 
Prix on the Dieppe course. Forty-eight European ears have 
undertaken to attempt the stupendous task, and America has 
come forth with one champion in the Thomas Flyer entered by 
the K. ];. Thomas Motor Company and the Harry S. Houpt Co. 
Unlike the European Elvers, the American machine that Lewis 
Strang has Keen engaged to drive in stock chassis similar to the 
1908 output, with the exception of a slight increase in the cylin- 
der bore. In selecting to race againsl specially built European 
racers, Harry S. Houpt believes that he will give the best possible 
demonstration of the value of his ear for speed, reliability and 
endurance. 

Earing headquarters have been secured in the town of T> 
which is but three or four miles from the magnificent course on 
which the great race will be run. To be present at the drawing 
of lots, and to accomplish all the formalities of cylinder verifica- 
tion, etc.. the entire team came to Paris after a few days on the 
course, and will return to Dieppe to remain permanently until 
Ihe day of the race. Tests on the fast French roads have p 
thai the Thomas racer can attain a speed of 90 miles an hour, 
which is sufficiently fast traveling to justify the belief that the 
American representative will give a nood account of itself on the 

day of tile 

For the present, the Dieppe course is rigorously closed to all 
racing ears. Stranir will thus be obliged to make whatever fur- 
ther tests are necessary on other hisrh-roads. Touring cars, 
however, cannot be kept off the course, and a considerable amount 
of time will lie spent on all the more difficult stretches in order 
that the driver may be thoroughly familiar with all conditions at 
the time of the race. Strang will carry with him as mechanic 
Augnste Guichard, while Montague Roberts, who has been en- 
tered as reserve driver, will be ready to take the wheel in case of 
any mishap prior to the r;i 

I'ALii alto — Stanford Auto and Manufacturing Co., renting repairing 
and sundries. Fire-proof garage. Day ami night service. 143-9 i: 
street. Tel. Main 7s. Machine and repair department, 511 Alma ■ 



"TBE LITTLE STEERSMAN" 

OUR AUTOMATIC TEERING AND SAFETY DEVICE 




Insures your safety and your car. Holds the car steady when you 
lose control. Assists the driver at all times. Price 810.00. 

TSe ABRAMS-MASON CO., Sole Manufacturers 
Chatham, N. Y. 

GEO. H. WOODWARD, Agent, 444-448 Fulton St. 
San Francisco 




Has Shown You 



Perfect Scores 

For both our entries in the 
twenty-four-hour endurance run 

RUNABOUT 

AND TOURING CAR 



OSEN & HUNTER 

407 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 



Los Angeles Branch 
1018 S. Main St. 




H. W. BOGEN 




Automobile Accessories of all kinds. 
AJAX Tires 




460 Golden Gate Ave. 

Phone Franklin 249 

SAN FRANCISCO 



SAN FRANCISCO 



LOS ANGELES 



Chanslor S Lyon Motor Supply Go. 



(INCORPORATED) 



Automobile Accessories 
LARGEST AND MOST COM- 
PLETB STOCK ON TBE COAST 

Agents for HARTFORD TIRES 



H. D. M.COI 

Secretary ud M»n»ter 



542-4-6 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 

Sw Francisco, C«l. 



LOCOMOBILES FOR HIRE 

SPECIAL RATES FOR THEATRE AND SHOPPING PARTIES. 

GENERAL MOTOR CAR CO. 



L'hon. Market 1398 



14th .nJ V.I. nil. Su 









July 4, 1908. 



A.ND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



The course over which tin Phomaa c«r will have to compete 
is a fair s;i in |>!o of French highway. It is of triangular shape, 
nearly 18 miles round, and will have to be covered ten times. 
Tlir whole surface will be perfect) all bad spots now being re- 
paired, and the whole IS miles will be treated with tar. There 
are straight-away stretches on whirl) the highest possible speed 
can be attained, two rather difficult winding down-grades, a long 
winding up-grade on which some of the contestants will have to 
drop into a lower geari and at least three pronounced hair-pin 
turns. Under the European regulations, all work on the car 
must be done by the driver and his mechanic; thus from the 
moment "go" is given, till the time the race is called off. it 
will 1"' impossible for Strang to obtain any other aid than the 
handing of tires, gasoline or tools over the stout barrier. 

In common with all other firms, the Thomas Company will 
have fl gasoline and tire stand immediately in front of the grand 
stiind. and it is here that the mechanics and general utility men 
will be in readiness to hand over anything that may he needed. 

The start of the race will take place at ti a. m., the first car to 
leaye being an Austin of English manufacture. The Thomas 
has secured fifteenth position at the starting line, the car imme- 
diately ahead being Jenatzy's Mors, and the one behind George 
Heath's Panhard. Altogether there are forty-nine competitors, 
representing America, Germany, England, Italy and Belgium. 

* * * 

The Diamond Rubber Company is in its new quarters on Mis- 
sion street at Second. The headquarters of this company have 
been across the bay in Oakland ever since the fire. Mr. C. E. 
Mntlii'wsnn, the Pacific Coast manager, is enthusiastic over the 
appointments of his really magnificent new establishment, and 
justly so. Mr. Mathewson is one of our most energetic workers 
for the advancement of the automobile, and a most successful 
man in his particular line. 

The La Honda Pebble Beach trip is to be undertaken by a 
large number of automobile owners over the Fourth, while others 
will circle the Bay via Niles. and San Leandro. 

» * * 

The sandy stretch in the Ocean Boulevard has been elimin- 
ated, and the road is in fine condition for automobiles. 






'tell 



What Has Given 

Pre-eminence Over Every 
Other American Car? 

Not speed, not hyper- 
horse-power — not freak de- 
tails or so-called innova- 
tions, but 

"Maxwell efficiency" — 
based upon "Maxwell" con- 
struction. Here are the 
"Maxwell" features, any 
one alone a strong enough 
argument to make your 
choice a " Maxwell." 

The "Maxwell" Multiple-Disc Clutch 
Three - Point Suspension ol Power 

Plant and Transmission 
Single-Unit Construction o! Engine 

and Transmission Case 
Pumpless Thermo - syphon Cooling 

System 
Indestructible Metal Bodies 

Send for free catalog, or, 
better, get a " Maxwell ' ' 
demonstration. 

MAXWELL-BRISCOE PACIFIC CO. 

440-442 Golden Gate Avenue, 
San Francisco, Cat. 




Model "I 

Touring ( 

$1350 




Model "O" 

Roadster 

$1350 



d The Tourist made good in forty-five oat of fifty-three races in 
which it competed. 

<J In those races in which it won other than first place the Tourist 
was entered in competition with cars of many times it's cost 
and horse power. 

Q The Tourist is not only the best car on the market for the 
price— better than many cars of much higher price and power- 
but it's upkeep cost is less than that of any other car. 

Q A demonstration run—always at the service of prospective cus- 
tomers—will prove the Tourist's merits. 

9 Our line comprises everything from runabouts to limousines. 



Model "S" 

Touring Car 

$2200 



Auto Vehicle Company, 

538 Golden Gate Avenue, San Francisco, California 

HAZLITT L. PELTON, Mgr. 



Model "N" 

Touring Car 

$2700 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 4, 1908. 



G-. V. Rogers, of Racine, Wis., secretary of the Mitchell Motor 
Car Company, accompanied by his friend, J. R. Chace, of San 
• lose, went to Del Monti- last Thursday to arrange for tin- run 

ill' Mitchell cars to Del Monte on the Fourth. 

* * * 

The following is the new code agreed upon for tin- season ■ 
1908 by the Farmers' Anti-Auto Protective Society, which has 
just held its annual conventions in the different States in the 
l r nion : 

1. On discovering an approaching team, the automobilist must 
stop off-side and cover his machine with a tarpaulin painted to 
correspond with the scenery. 

"2. The speed limit on country roads this year will be secret, 
and the penalty for violation will be $10 for every mile an 
offender is caught going in excess of it. 

3. In case an automobile makes a team run away, the pi 

will he $50 for the Brsi mile. $100 for the second. $200 lor the 
third mill, etc., that the team runs; in addition to the usual 
damages. 

4. On approaching a corner where he cannot command a view 
ol' ihe road ahead, the automobilist must stop nol less than 100 
yards from the turn, *ool his horn, ring a bell, tire a re. 

i iloo, and send up three bombs at intervals of five minutes. 

5. Automobiles must again be seasonably painted — that i -. io 
they will merge with the pastoral ensemble, and not he startling. 
They must be green in spring, golden in summer, red in autumn, 
and white in winter. 

6. Automobiles running on the country roads at night must 
.-end up a red rocket every mile, and wait ten minutes for the 
road to clear. They may then proceed carefully, blowing their 
horns and shooting Roman candles. 

7. In case an automobile comes up behind and wants to pass, 
ihe farmer will affect deafness until the automobilist calls him 
a hard name. 

8. All members of the society will give up Sunday to chasing 
Automobiles, shouting and shooting at them, making arrests, 
and otherwise discouraging country touring on that day. 

9. In ease a horse will not pass an automobile, notwithstanding 
the scenic tarpaulin, the automobilist will take the machine apart 
as rapidly as possible and conceal the parts in the grass. 

10. In case an automobile approaches a farmer's house when 
the roads are dusty, it will slow down to one mile an hour, and 
ihe chauffeur will lay the dust in front of the house with a hand- 
sprinkler worked over the dashboard. 

* * » 

Among those who will motor from San Francisco to Del Monte 
on July 3d, to remain over the Fourth, are Mr. and Mrs. Phineas 
F. Ferguson, Dr. and Mrs. Hassler, Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Richards 
and Miss Richards. 

* * * 

A 30-horeepower White Steamer, carrying four 

set up a new record from San Francisco to Los ijigeles on April 
28, 1908, covering the -178 mile mountainous journey in IT 
hours and IT minutes, thus cutting 56 minutes from the former 
record, which had stood for nearly two years. Furthermore, the 
record breaking White was at once driven back over the road to 
San Francisco in 19 hours and 43 minutes, thus establishing a 
round trip record of 37 hours. 

* * * 

A number of prominent San Jose people are contemplating 
motoring to Del Monte for the Fourth of July. They include 
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Lion, Mr. and Mrs. A. IT. Martin, Mr. 
and Mrs. George B. Polhemus, Mrs. Ozier, Earl Fisher and J. R. 
Chace. 



Phone Franklin 2qij 

Up-To-Date Autos 
for hire at all hours 




MAX MAMLOCR 



J70 GOLDEN GATE AVENCE 



SAN FRANCISCO 




Driving a Stevens-Duryea 

Light Six 

means absolute ease of control and manipulation. You will not Le all 

tired out at night even after steering a STEVENS-DURYEA for 100 or 

200 miles a day. 

^ Shifting gears, constant alertness and manipulation required in high 

power [over forty horse-power] r-cylinder cars causes strain, exhaustion 

and that "very tired feeling." You forget the pleasures of your ride 

when physically worn out. 

fl Compare the effects, at the end of a day's trip, of a ride in a high 

powered 4-cylinder car, as contrasted with a Stevens-Duryea Light Six. 

*l Stevens-Duryea Cars have an enviable record of achievement behind 

them. 

fl Arrange for a demonstration and obtain full particulars from 

PACIFIC MOTOR CAR COMPANY 

376-380 Golden Gate Ave. 

Oakland Branch: 1308-10 Franklin Street. 

Manafactared by Stercns-Daryea Company, Chlcopee Falls, Mass., I. S. A. 



Mr. and Mrs. E. •'. Stanton, accompanied by Mrs. J. C. Far- 
rell, Miss Lillian Stanton, Miss Adelaide Stanton, and Roy 
Stanton, arrived at Del Monte from Los Angeles on Thursday 
in their Great Pierce Arrow machine. 



Automobile 



and 



Carriage 



Painting, Varnishing and Trimming 
Tops and Scat Covers 



made to order 



Locomobile Repairing 



Complete line of Locomobile parts 
Estimates Given an oil work 



The Greenland Co., Inc. 



J. MURRAY PAGE, Mgr. 



Phone Market- 1398 



287 Valencia St.. 



IGNITION ar, d at less expense and inconven- 

TRflllRI F^ ience to you than at present. Rent 
I liUUDLtd your batteries f rom A u T o | 6NmrjN COi 

AVOIDED 709-711 Octavia St., Phone Market 5678. 



July i. 1903. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



25 



Mr. and Mrs. Cuyler Lee, accompanied by Admiral and Mrs. 
Swinburn and Mr. Edgar Mizner, will spend the week-end al 
Witter Springs, driving up there in Mr. [jee'a Packard "Thirty." 

* * • 

The Wfliite Automobile Company owns garages in Boston, 
Cleveland, Philadelphia, New York, Chicago and Cincinnati. 
Now San Francisco is to be added to the list. C. A. Hawkins, 
general Western sales manager of the White Company, yesterday 
gave "in the interesting information that within a week they 
will lie moved from their presenl location on the corner of Mar- 
ket and Van Ness, and work immediately commenced at thai 
site on a two-story reinforced concrete building. The new home 
of the big automobile firm is expected to be completed within 
five months. According to the plans, it will be the most elabo- 
rately equipped auto repository west of Chicago. There will he 
three entrances, one on Market street, Van Ness avenue and 

Fell street. 

It is significant that the While is the only company con- 
fident enough in their product,, and with money enough, to make 
the enormous investments necessary for these purposes. While 
other companies have established temporary branch houses by 
renting salesrooms in various cities, no other company has gone 
in with large investments to insure owners of cars the best ser- 
vice at minimum cost. 

Following are some of the features of the While Company's 
new home: The garage will be equipped with the automatic 
fusible plug sprinkler system for lire protection. This system 
is the most expensive known, and is the lirsl of its kind to he 
installed on this coast. They will have their own paint and up- 
holstery shops. The floors will be of cement; pressed brick 
fronts. Every fifty feet on the Market and Van Ness frontage 
on the top of the building an are light will he placed tor illumi- 
nation on gala occasions. 

There will he a department under a competeni manager tor 

automobile hiring and rent ing new While cars id' the latest model 
fully equipped; also a taximeter cah service. 

A new garage system will be installed, such as i- used in the 

White garages throughout the East, by which everj car that goes 

and conies is checked in and Out, and records always open In the 
car owners. The White Company never has paid any commis- 
sion lo chauffeurs on the sale of White cars, repairs or equip- 
ment, and have pledged themselves not to do so, though they 

realize this means, as in the past, lhat drivers will Irv fo induce 
owners not lo keep their cars at the While Garage. 

There will he a second-hand car department where all second 
hand cars will in 1 sold, bought and exchanged. 
The new machine shop will he the host equipped in the i itj for 

doing work on either steam or gasoline Cars. 

There will be a department of auto accessories, parts, til 
equipment in which owners will find the finest display on the 
coast. The offices and salesrooms will be on the second floor, and 
a handsomely appointed parlor for ladies has been planned for. 



NUF SED 



HOT STUFF 



KEENAN BROS. 

Automobile Engineers, Machinists and Blacksmiths. 
273 Valencia Street, San Francisco. Telephone Market 1985 



TIPS TO AUTOMOBILISTS 



PALO ALTO — Corbalay & Thorpe Auto Co., renting, repairing and 
sundries. Fire-proof garage. Day and night service. 443-9 Emerson St 
Telephone. Main 78. 

SAN JOSE— Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North First street. The best French 
dinner in California, 75c, or a la carte. Automobile parties given par- 
ticular attention. 

SAN JOSE— WALLACE BROS*. GARAGE. Market and St. James 
streets. 20,000 Bquare feet of Door space. Special accommodations for 
ladles. Repairing, sundries, renting. Fire proof garage. Day and night 
service. 

sax JOSE— Stop at LETCHER'S N^w Oarage f>ir drst-dan service. 

We cater to (he touring public Attractive parlor for ladies In connec- 
tion, "Mission Front" garage next to corner of First and St. James Sts. 

GILROY. CAL. — George E. Tlce. general machinist, expert repairing of 
automobiles and engines a specialty. I»ay or night service, 260 N Mon- 
terey street. 

PETAL1 M \ M Ine Works Any kind of auto 

nine shop. Cornet 
Third and I 



SPLITDORF IGNITION 

Do you want to be dead sure that your next trip will 
not be marred by any of those tantalizing ignition 
troubles that form nine-tenths of automobile worry? 

There's a way to do it. 

Use Ignition Apparatus that has been tried in the 
crucible of long and severe use and has made good. 

Such is SPLITDORF IGMTlON-used today by 
thousands of autoists in races, pleasure trips and 
contests and proved to be up to the mark in every 
retpeot. 

All summed up in four words— "SPLITDORF IGNI- 
TION-NONE BETTER." 

Ask Dept. A for our new 1908 catalog. 

PACIFIC COAST BRANCH, SPLITDORF 
LABORATORY, 520 Van Ness Avenue, San 
Francisco, Cal. 



Pacific Automobile Exchange 

An original automobile repair and tire insurance. 
The contract supplied by this company for a nominal 
sum per month, guarantees your REPAIR and TIRE 
bills for one year. Your car therefore is necessarily 
kept in perfect running condition. Something new and 
worth while investigating. 



465 Golden Gate Avenue 



Phone M.rt.t I42S 



San Francisco 



VULCANIZING 

Davis Bros. 

IHCORPORATED 

TIRES RETREADED AND MADE NEW 
Phone Park 710 979 Golden Gate Ave 



V UL C ANIZIN G 

Stevens & Elkington Rubber Co. 

Sin Francisco. Cil. 



Phone Franklin 612 

524 Polk SI. near Golden Gate tve. 



Reliance Automobile Co. 

GARAGE, LIVERY AND MACHINE SHOP 



PHONES: 



Park 324 
Park 325 



Fulton and Octavia 



Tnonas B. Jatfery 8 Company. 117-125 Valencia St., San Franci-to 



Garage Phone, Market 3337 
tOay) 



Stand Phone, West 7145 
Thompson's Cafe (Night.) 



Thomas Flyers 



FOR HIRE AT ALL HOURS. 
THE ONLY 6-CYLINDER THOMAS. 

J. E. Neumann, Manager. 



Rapid Garage. 1841 Market St 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 4, 1908. 



Del Monte is preparing a hearty welcome for the "Mitchell 
Family." which is a cluh formed of owners of Mitchell motor 
cars, which is expected at the big hotel two hundred and fifty 
strong on July 4th. The members of the club will be the guests 
of the Mitchell Company at an elaborate luncheon to be served 

on "i f the lawns of the hotel. The hotel management will 

put up silver trophies to be competed for by all the motor car 
guests at Del Monte on the Fourth. The trophies are to be 
awarded to the drivers of the cars leaving the steps of the hotel, 
making the seventeen mile drive and return to the steps in one 
hour and thirty minutes. One cup will be givi D to a winning 
Mitchell and the other to the winner of any other make. The 
Santa Cruz County Automobile Club will probably join the "Mir- 
e-hell family" in their run to 1 'el Monte. 

* * * 

since the usefulness of the horse is steadily decreasing in every 
community, we should like to ask Mr. Belmont, Mr. Kecne and 

other - of existing race-track conditions whether they 

would oppose betting and gambling at automobile race- rai - 

'I he men who are trying to improve tb breed of aul biles. 

are they not entitled to the same favoritism under the law thai i- 
extended \<> the defenders of the horse? Electrieitj has already 
done away with the service of thousands upon thousands i I horses 
formerly employed on horse-car lines, and the business automo- 
bile i> steadily doing away with the equine drudge. Sine , - 

mobile progri -- means not only greater convenience and i 
for the public, but the saving of many an overloaded and ill- 
treated horse, it seems to us that if anybody should be fa 
it is the motor ear builder. That man who is so fortunate as to 
in cut a cheap and useful automobile, whether propelled by steam 
or gasoline or electricity, will confer a very great boon upon city- 
dueller and country dweller alike. \\ by not offer prizes for him? 
Why not, to hasten tin- day of the popular motor-ear, legalize the 
"shell iranie" and roulette on all tracks where motor races are 
run? It would greatly increase the attendance at them, and so 
help to increase the value of tin.' prizes to be contended lor. And 
how sad it is to think of the way in which the American horse 
deteriorated in the days when horse-racing in this country 
amounted to nothing at all! — Exchange. 

• * • 

J. F. Maroney and Harry C. Hunt made the trip from San 
Francisco to Del Monte by automobile last Wednesday, continu- 
ing their trip from there to Los Angeles, stopping a night at all 
the principal points en route. 

James Wood, manager of the Hotel St. Francis, and Mrs. 
Wood, alter a delightful visit to Del Monte, continued their trip 
to the southern part of the State, making the journey as the 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Statler of Buffalo, N. Y., in the 
hitters' automobile. 

Dr. and Mrs. W. W. Richardson, and Mr. and Mrs. P. 1'. 
O'Connor, who motored to I 'el Monte from the south, an 
a couple of days' rest at the hotel went on to San Francisco, re- 
turned here last Sunday for a more lengthy stay. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Holmes, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. T. 
I'. Birchall of Toronto. Canada, moto ed from Berkeley to [ ><-l 
Monte Friday, and spenl tie- week-end at the hotel. 



B ©©,©©© 

miles is what, a prominent, business man traveled with his car 
equipped with the 

SnD[p»ip)3@iiffii®imtory %M1 Spsrninigg 




He further states that they have 
given him no trouble and have 
saved the Tires, the car in genera) 
and improved the riding 100 per 
cent,. 

We will place a set, on your ma- 
chine and if they do not do all 
that, we claim for them, we will 
refund you the money. 



Frank O. Renstrom Company 



424-446 Stanyan St., San Francisco. 



Phone Park 476 




What stronger proof could there he of Ajax Material 
and Workmanship? 

Write for copy of guarantee stating what size tire you are using. 
Address Depl. W 

AJAX-GRIEB RUBBER COMPANY 

GENERAL OFFICES: 

N. E. Cor. 57ln St. and Broadway, New lark City. 

Factories, Trenton, N. J. 

BRANCHES: 

Denver, 152Q Cleveland Place. 

Seattle. 1102 Broadway 

San Francisco. 460 Golden Gate Ave. 

Los Angeles, 1040 S. Main St. 



New York, 1776 Broadway. 
Boston, 819-A Boylston Si. 
Chicago. 1418 Michigan Ave. 
Detroit. 743 Woodward Ave. 



AGENTS IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



Washington and East Sts. 



Phone Kearny 678 



Ferry Garage Co. 

c_/411 Workmanship Guaranteed 

Storage. Renting Supplier Machinist 



TfcLKrHONE MlItKBT 1M2 



GEO. H. WOODWARD 

Automobile Machinist, 




Fine Repairing 
Machine Work 

44448 FULTON 
St., San Francisco 



THE PEER OF ALL! 

PLANET OIL COMPANY'S 

TRANSIT AUTOMOBILE OILS 

BASS-HUETER PAINT CO. 
816 Mission Street Distributors 

ADAPTED TO EVERY MACHINE 

Friction Costs more than Lubrication 



Ji;i.y I. 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



27 



GOVERNMENT MAPS FOR AUTOMOBILE TOURISTS. 

Automobile tourists are beginning to find the topographic 
maps of the Geological Survey invaluable in laying oul routes 
of pleasure travel. All public roads, as well as all importanl 

' i ite mails, are shown on those maps, while the contour lines 
indicating the topography and' showing the grades of the roads 
enable the automobilist to determine accurately the character of 
the country through which he intends to travel. 

These maps are made primarily as bases for the geologic map 
of the United States which the Geological Survey is constructing, 
and the fact that they can be employed heller than any other 
maps for non-scientific purposes, such as automobiling, attests 
their practical value, though this is only one of a very great 
number of uses to which they are put. No maps, in fact, are 
so generally used as the Survey's topographic maps. Commercial 
maps are based on them, and a score of bureaus and departments 
of the Government use them as bases for special maps or plot- 
tings, for determining routes of march or travel, for planning 
engineering works, and for many other like public purposes. 

The topographic map or atlas which will be formed by the 
combined topographic sheets published by the Survey was re- 
ferred to last winter by Secretary Garfield, in a report to Con- 
gress, as the "mother map of the country,'" for it is now the prin- 
cipal source of all other maps. The sheets cover areas termed 
quadrangles, whose limits are defined by meridians and parallels, 
and nearly 1800 of them have already been completed. Some of 
the States have valued these maps so highly that they have de- 
frayed half the cost of the surveys. Tl \pense of surveying 

a quadrangle and engraving a sheet ranges from $3,500 to $8,000 
— but after the map has served its scientific purpose to the Gov- 
ernment, extra copies can bo purchased by any one for 5 cents 
each, or $3 a hundred, which is simply the cost of paper and 
printing. 

The maps are so detailed and accurate that clever clay mod- 
elers have used thorn as liases for relief or physical maps which 
were exact miniature reproductions of the regions comprised 
within the quadrangles, showing every hill and valley in relative 
steepness, and the lakes, swamps, falls of rivers, etc., as well as 
all the important works of man. 



-(the peninsula} 

SAN MATEO, CALIFORNIA 

A Twentieth Century Hotel of the Highest Degree of excellence. Amer- 
ican and European plan. Open February 22, '08. Thirty minutes by 
rail from San Francisco. Located in a Beautiful Park of thirty years' 
cultivation. All the charm and delight of the country combined with the 
attractions and conveniences of the metropolis. For reservations or 
Information address 

JAS. H. DOOL1TTLE, Manager 

San Mateo, California 



Los Angeles After lite Big Ones. 

Los Angeles proposes to wrest from Salt Lake the title of 
"Cyclists' Western Mecca," and to that end, some of her capi- 
talists are figuring on building a superb saucer track, whose 
dimensions are to be 400x240 feet. The promoters are E. Pick- 
ering, president of the company controlling the Seal Gardens ; 
C. R. Caudle and W. H. Steel, the latter being a capitalist of 
Oklahoma. Negotiations are pending with Captain Theo. An- 
gel, who built the Salt Lake, Ogden and old Los Angeles tracks, 
and work will be begun within thirty days. It is the intention to 
have the first meet about July 4th. The announcement is also 
made that a franchise has been granted by the National Cycling 

Association. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph B. Coryell of Menlo Park will motor to 
Del Monte in their Great Arrow Limousine touring car on July 
3d, and remain over the Fourth. 



Auto Eye ? You Know How Eyes Suffer after Exposure 

in Sun, Wind and Dust. Neglect results in Eye-Strain, Red- 
ness and Granulation. Be Wise in time. Murine Soothes and 
Quickly Relieves. 




Buy your fireworks for out-of-town use from California 

Fire Works Company, at same old place, 219 Front street. 



Automobile Excursions 

ROUND TRIP TICKET "siF] ]"0 Sflfl JOSC 



EVERY SUNDAY 




Leave Garage, San Francisco, 9 a. m. 
Leave Electric Tower, San Jose, 4 p. m. 

ONLY 7-PASSEKGER UP-TO-DATE AUTOS USEO 



FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS RING UP 




M A M L O C K 



W 



Phone Franklin 2913 
370 Golden Gate Avenue 



-J 



38 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 4, 1908. 



a % (Bat 



This is the story of Paka the cat. 

If then' are throe or four men walking along and only one 
woman, the cat will turn aside from the inch and follow the one 
woman. 

Now, the reason for this is the story I am telling you. 

In the beginning, Paka sat in the bush, till one day she fell 
the pain of hunger. 

So she came down to the shore, and there she mel a serval 
who was hunting the oralis of the shore. So Paka wont up to 
the sorval and said: "Good morning," and the serval said. "Who 

are you ?" 

-it is 1— Paka.". 

"What do you waul ?" 

"I want to follow you about and BO gel food." 

So the serval said, "Very g 1. then. Here, eat these crabs." 

So Paka ate of the oralis, and she followed the serval i j 

days. 

Till one day there came a leopard, and fought with the serval 
and killed him. 

So Paka thought in her heart: "Now, this one was not a manly 
one: he who is the man is the leopard." So Paka wen! up to the 
leopard and saluted loin. "Good morning." 

So the leopard said, "And who are you?" 

-Ii is f—Paka." 

"What do you want ?" 

"I wani to follow you about and get food." 

So the leopard said, "Very good. Here, eat of this serval." 

Sip Paka followed the leopard many days and many weeks. 

Til] one day came a lion and he fell on the leopard and killed 
him. 

So Paka thought in her heart: "Now, this one also was not a 
manly one: he who is the man is the lion." 

So she went to the lion and said, "Good morning." 

And the linn said, "Who are you ?" 
■It is I— Paka." 

"What do you want ?" 

Sn 1'aka said, "I want to follow you about that you may give 
me food." 

Sn the lion said, "Then eat of this leopard." 

So Paka ate of the leopard, and she followed the lion for many 
weeks and many months, till one day I here came an elephant 

And the elephant came and struck the lion with his trunk and 
the lion died. 

So Paka said in lor heart: "Now, this one, too, was not a 
manly One: he who is the man is the elephant." 

Sn Paka went and greeted the elephant, "Good morning." 
The elephant said. "Ami who are you?" 
••It is [— Paka." 
"What do you want ?" 

"I want to follow you about that you may give me 1 1." 

So the elephanl said. "Then eat of this lion." 

So Paka ate of the lion, and she followed the elephant for 

many months and many days. 

Till one day came a man: and that son of Adam came and be 
look his matchlock ami fired. 

And he hit the elephant and the elephant ran away. 

After running a long way, he fell down, and that son of Adam 
came ami he fired again and again until tin- elephant was finished 
and he died. 

Now Paka said : "Behold, he also was not a manly one: he who 

is the man is the son of Adam." 

Sn Paka went up and saluted him. saying, "Good morning." 

And [he man said, "Who are you?" 

"It is 1, Paka." 

"Whal do you waul V 

"I want to follow you about that you may give me food." 

So the man said. "Then eat of the elephanl." 

So Paka stayed with the man and ale of the elephant, while he 
was cutting out the tusks. 

When the man had finished cutting out the tusks, he wended 
his way home and came to his village. 

Xow. that man had two wives, and the one he loved and the 
ill her he loved not. 

So he came first to the house of her whom he loved not. that he 
might stay a -hurt lime and go In the house of her whom lie loved. 

So he came there and greeted the wife whom he loved not. and 
straightway went on to the house of her whom he loved. 




MAKE YOUR BEDROOM 

Notable for its expression of refinement and feeling of repose. 
We will gladly* assist you in doing this with our carefully 
selected stock of Wall Paper and Fabrics. We carry the 
things you are looking for, and at the right prices. 
L. TOZER & SON CO. 
Interior Decorators 

1 527 Pine Si. , Between Van Net* and Polk. Sao Frucuco. 
167 Twelfth St.. near MacbioD, Oakland. 



FIRE MARINE AUTOMORILE 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 



CAPITAL, $1,600,000 



ASSETS, $6,000,000 



CALIFORNIA AND SANSOME STREETS 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Cash Capital. (200,000. 



Cash Assets, J681.377.I9 



Pacific Coast Gasualty Co. 

OF CALIFORNIA. 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, Elevators, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Burglary, Plate Glass Insurance. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; John C. ColemsLn, Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; F. P. Deerlng, 
Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, H. E. Bothln, Edward L. Brayion, John C. Cole- 
man, F. P. Deerlng, E. F. Green, James K. Moffltt, Henry Rosenfeld, 
Adolph A. Son, William S. Tevls. 

Head Office — Merchants Exchange Building. San Francisco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company, General Agents for California, Kohl Building, San 
Francisco. 



The Connecticut Fire Insurance Co, 

Of Hartford. Established 18E0. 

Capital 11,000,000.00 

Total Assets 6.721 ,433.01 

Surplus to Policyholders 3,282,186.00 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL BUILDING 
BENJAMIN J. SMITH, MANAGER. 



British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co., Ltd, 

Of Liverpool. 
Capital 16,700.000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agor--, 
3 ao SANSOME STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Office Phone Tem 


porary 3657 








Residence 


Phone 


West 4784 












DR. A 


. H 


. WRIGHT 








Residence: 


1542 


Devisadero Street 




io to 4 








,000-10-n CHRONICLE 


BUILDING 



July 1. L90 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



89 



When he had come there he said i" her: "Oh, my wife whom 

love, I have done this on purpose. 

"I came lirst to the house of the other thtfi I mighl come 

straightway to you whom I love, and remain with you a long 
time." 

Xuw. the woman was angry in thai he had gone first to the 

house of tlic oilier, and she said to him : "What you say is false!" 

So she came up to him and struck him — pah! 

That man rtirl not do anything; he turned round and left the 
hut. 

Then thought Paka: "Now. even this one is not the manly 
one. Why does he so away? He who is the man is the woman." 

So she went up to the woman and said to her, "Good morning." 

The woman said. "And who are you?" 

"It is I— Paka." 

"What do von want?" 

"I want to follow you ahout that you may give me food." 

So the woman said to her, "Very good. Sit here in my house." 

Now, this is the story of Paka, the cat, which comes from long 
ago, and this is the reason why a cat will leave a man and follow 
i woman. 

— Translated from Sivahili by Captain C. II. Stigand. 



THE SEASON OF COMMENCEMENTS. 

This is (lie season of "sweet girl graduates" and commence- 
menl exercises. It is the psychological moment for the college 
professor to journey forth, and from the platform of the country 
high school tell fond parents a few wholesome truths. I have 
chanced to attend not a few of these affairs in the last few days, 
and from San Rafael to San Diego, [ have heard the same re- 
frain. The Berkeley professor, whether his department he chem- 
istry or Romance languages, sounds always upon one note, and 
his instrument is the financial accordcon. TTc does not send the 
pupils forth into the hard, cold world inspired only with a de- 
sire to accrue untainted dollars. TTc does not gird them with 

ideals, and charge them to touch only clean money. His. is not 

the swan SOng, nor yet the siren song of the Prophet of Wealth 

of Character. To hi' sure, he may believe in all these things, hut 

he does not thunder them forth from the Iliv.li School rostrum. 

One ami all of the Berkeley professors fchat I have reeentlj h d 

have talked ahout the pay of the man who goes into academic 
life. Tl may not be a concerted action on their part, hut I am 
suspicious after hearing a dozen of them in as many widely 

separated towns, There is every evidence to believe that they 
have determined to rub it into the rural districts that tin' i 
professor is underpaid, and thereby create a sentiment that will 
iii i inn' remedy the detect in salary - 

There is no doubi thai instructors and professors in I 
arc \er\ poorly paid. The average professor cannot afford to 

keep a nurse for his children, ami even a maid-of-all-work is a 

luxury. Yet his wife must put on a front with her 

station, musl serve tea biscuits to the faculty ladies, and pink 
lemonade lo the student body every tew and then. The life of 

the college professor, who has no! a personal income, is mostly 
thorns even when the crop oi m>c, is no! mildewed. There is 

some excuse I'm- the learned educator who. from the high 

platform, blows upon his own financial accordeon. It sounds 

like a melody in. (Mi (i. to he sun-, hut it may tickle the tym- 
panum of the people, and bring about the desired raise in sal- 
aries. It's lather funny, of course, hut reforms are not always 

accomplished in the most dignified fashion. 



The noise, the smoke and the tire, the wounds, the hums 

and the killing! will go risrlit on to-day just as if we had n 
claim to being considered a degree or two above the Fiji [slander 
ui. Why a man should demonstrate himsel 

or ten kinds of asses in order to prove his patriotism 

comprehension. 



Tin' vacation time is come, and before going to the conn- 
try, the careful housewife is having her carpets and rugs cleaned 
and is packing them away for use when the family returns. The 
carpet and the rugs should be cleaned anyway, before the warm 
weather comes and the house given a thorough overhauling. If 
von wan; prompt and etlr a should try Spauld- 
• Cleaning nue. 



Charles Lyons 

LONDON TAILOR. 

ESTABLISHED 80 YEARS 

Importer and Dealer in Foreign and Domestic Woolens 

Suits to order from $25.00 up 

Overcoats $25.00 " 

Trousers " " " $ 6.00 " 

1432 Fillmore St, 731 Van Ness Ave., 771 Market St, San Francisco 
958 Broadway, Oakland 



NATIONAL BREWING CO. 

TELEPHONE PARK 33 

"The Beer that Stands the Test" 

Orders for Shipping Filled on Short Notice. 

Offices «nd Brewer,: CORNER FULTON AND WEBSTER STREETS 



Paper of Every Description. 

ZELLERBACH PAPER COMPANY 

SUCCEEDING A. ZELLERBACH &. SONS 

Zellerbach Building, S. E. corner Battery and Jackson Streets 



White Diamond Water Go. 



PCRE WATER FOR OAKLAND 
ALAMEDA 

(Incorporated) BERKELEY 

An Absolutely Sanitary Water, neither Boiled, Distilled nor Chemically Treated, 
but Bacteriologically Purified by Electrical Process.5 gallons DELIVERED FRESH 
EACH WEEK, $1.50 per mo. Single 5 gallon bottle. 50c. 

PHONES: PIEDMONT 1720 AND HOME A 4iqa 

NO. 1 TELEGRAPH AVB. OAKLAND, CAL. 




H. Bette 

1 163 ELLIS STREET, S. F. 

Formerly 424 Sutter Street. 



Importer gf Fine Novelties, CMaker of Ladies' 
Tailored Suits, Riding Habits a Specially. 



Dr. R. T. Leaner ®> Co. 



201 Pacific Building, 2d floor, 819 Market 
Street, cor. 4th, San Francisco. Surgeon 
Chiropodists formerly of 6 Geary St. Re- 
move Corns entirely whole — painless — with- 
out knife. Bunions and Ingrowing nails 
cured by a special and painless treatment. 



Jefferson 


Square Bowling 


Alleys 


and 


Billiard and Pool Parlors 


UDEN GATE AVE. 


CORNER OCTAVIA 




LARGEST AND FINEST IN 


THE WORLD 



30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 4, 1908. 



H 



StF 



OTEL 3T. r RANCIS 



At Union Square, the 

Center of the City's 

life and color 



Coder th. management mi JAMBS WOODS 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Bank of Italy. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1908. a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all savings deposits, free 
of taxes, payable on and after Wednesday. July 1, 1!*08. Dividends not 
called for are added to and bear the same rate of interest as the princi- 
pal from July 1. 1908. 

L. SCATENA. President. A. PEDRINI. Cashier. 
Office — 632 Montgomery Street, Montgomery Block. (On or about July 
20, 1908. will remove to our own building. S. E. corner Montgomery and 
Clay streets.) 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Security Savings Bank. 
For the half year ending June 30. 1908, dividends upon all deposits at 
the rate of four <4) per cent per annum, free of taxes, will be payable on 
and after July 1, 1908. FRED W, RAY. Secretary. 

Office — 316 Montgomery street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending June 30, 1908. a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of tuxes. 
payable on and after Wednesday, July 1. 1908. Dividends not called for 
are added to and bear the same rate of interest as the principal from 
July 1, 190S. Monev deposited on or before July 10th will draw interest 
from July 1. 1908. GEORGE A. STORY. Cashier. 

Office — 706 Market street, opposite Third, San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Central Trust Company of California. 
For the half year ending June 30. 1908, a dividend has been declared on 
all deposits in the savings department of this bank, at the rate- of four (4) 
per cent per annum, payable on and after Wednesday. July 1. 1908. Divi- 
dends not called for are added to and bear the same rate of interest as 
the principal from July 1. 1908. 

B. G. TOGNAZZI. Manager. 
Office — 42 Montgomery street, corner Sutter, San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

For the half year ending June 30. 1908. a dividend has been declared at 

the rates per annum of four and one quarter (4 1-4) per cent on term 

deposits and four (4) per cent on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, payable 

on and after Wednesday, July 1, 1908. 

Depositors are entitled to draw their dividends at any time during the 
succeeding half year. A dividend not drawn will be added to the deposit 
account, become a part thereof, and earn dividend from July 1st. 

DOVELL WHITE. Cashier. 
Office — Northwest corner California and Montgomery streets. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Humboldt Savings Bank. 

For the half year ending June 30. 1908, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all savings deposits, free 
of taxes, payable on and after Wednesday. July 1. lHOS. Dividends not 
■ ailed for are added to and bear the same rate of interest as the principal 
from July 1. 1908. W. E. PALMER, Secretary. 

Office — 785 Market street, near Fourth. San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Italian American Bank. 
A dividend at the rate of 4 per cent per annum, net free of taxes, has 
been declared for the half year ending June 30. 1908, on all savings de- 
posits, payable on and after July 1, 1908. Dividends not called for will 
be added to the principal and bear the same rate of interest 

A. SBARBORO, President. A. E. SBARBORO, Cashier. 
Office — S. E. Corner Montgomery and Sacramento streets. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1908. a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Wednesday, July 1. 1908. Dividends not called for 
are added to and bear the same rate of Interest as the principal from 
July i, 1908. GEORGE TOURNY. Secretary. 

Office — 526 California street. San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending June 3, 1908. a dividend has been declared at 

the rate of 4 per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, payable 

on and after Wednesday, July 1, 1908. Dividends not called for are added 

to and bear the same rate of interest as the principal from July 1. 1908. 

WM. A. BOSTON. Cashier. 
Office — 101 Montgomery street, corner Sutter street, San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Scandinavian Savings Bank. 
For the half year ending June 30, 190S. a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Wednesday, July 1. 1908. 

L. M. MAC'DONALD. Cashier. 
Office — Chronicle Building. San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Continental Building and Loan Association. 

Will, on July 1, 1908, pay the UBUal interest of 6 per cent per annum on 

term deposits or class "C" stoek. 4 per eent per annum on ordinary or 

class "D" stock. The Interest on ordinary deposits, if not withdrawn, will 

be added to the principal and thereaftei draw interest at the same rate. 

WASHINGTON DODGE. President. WILLIAM CORBIN. Secretary. 

Office — Market and Church Sts., San Francisco. 



A priure from IGtfr a ($tij?r Bxht 

By J. 0. S. Thornton. 

ft is a few minutes after eleven, and I wander into a pool 
room on Webster sheet, just below Ellis. At the entrance 
stands a small, ferret-eyed sentinel, and he examines me with a 
piercing scrutiny as 1 pass into the den where books are made 
nn the races now running at Seattle, Latonia and Hamilton. By 
his side repose a collection of dust-begrimed, unused boxes that 
are displayed for a blind, to convey the impression that this 
establishment is nothing more harmful than a cigar stand; 
although, if you were inclined to make a purchase, the "guard" 
would smile at you suggestively, and, in response to your de- 
mand for a cigar or package of cigarettes, would say "he was just 
out" of that particular commodity; you could obtain it at the far 
corner. 

Inside, the walls are hung with cards bearing (he entries at 
the several I racks: while the tables are strewn with volumes 
dedicated to the achievements of race horses Eor the past couple 
of years. Clustered in threes or Eours about the room stand or 
Bit a motley aggregation of human specimens, studiously scan- 
ning the names of the equines, pausing as they contemplate the 
distance of the event, the weight imposed by the handicapper, 
and the ability of the jockey Blated to guide the animal through 
the fray. 

Behind the counter stands Dick Wilson, the acknowledged 
"boss" of the joint, and his two clerks, and from 11.30 until 
after four o'clock the trio are industriously engaged in raking 
in the wagers which half a hundred men, regular patrons of the 
place, make there every week day. From fifteen hundred to 
three thousand dollars is handled daily, and of this amount those 
who bet lose enough to pay the running expenses of the estab- 
lishment, and keep Wilson and his aides-de-camp on the velvet 
floor of prosperity. High rental is paid for the premises, as is 
evidenced by the fact that there are several rooms above the 
"operating room," which contain nothing more pretentious than 
wall paper and dust, and a spacious yard that abuts the rear 
of the hall. The racing information from the several tracks, in- 
cluding the winners, place and show horses, time and prices, are 
received over the telephone from Sausalito; and immediately the 
winning names are announced, the successful bettors parade 
to the counter, present their tickets, and receive the sum which 
their wager entitled them to according to the ante-post or track 
betting price, whichever the bettor elected to receive at the time 
he bought his ticket. 

The time for the call to the post in the first race at Latonia is 
announced. Some of the students, poring over the dope sheets 
with feverish zeal, hasten to complete their analysis of some 
favored horse in time to buy a ticket for four bits or a dollar 
before the imperative tones of Wilson's clerk announces that the 
"race is closed." and the magic prices arc rubbed from the card. 
Then prevails a deathless, nerve-racking silence. The "sports" 
puff expectantly at their stogies or cigarettes, and watch the tele- 
phone bell as though they expected it to announce that Gabriel 
was burnishing his trumpet preparatory to summoning us all 
to the heavenly paradise where race horses are unknown and 
pool-room bosses are forbidden entry. Tinkle goes the bell, once, 
twice, thrice. The guests ride en masse, their senses keyed to 
a high pitch, their ears alert : and by a concerted movement they 
advance I" the counter the better to observe the mystic mark as 
the i lerk inscribes a circle about the name of the equine that was 
victorious, and scratches a 2 and :l respectively over the names of 
the horses that finished second and third. As the name of the 
victor is declared, those who were fortunate enough to land on 
the winner express their joy in various ways, by a sudden out- 
burst of laughter, or by a hoot and "I told you so." The loser 
sometimes lets an oath escape Ids lips as he angrily tosses a 
worthless tickei on the floor: other times he frowns, reflectively 
counts the few lingering coins that res) in his pocket, that sepa- 
rate him id mi starvation, and proc Is to select another horse 

on which to seek to recoup his first losses. And so on through 
the long afternoon, a veritable war of wit against wit, cunning 
against cunning, with the diluted dupes that make up the patrons 
struggling against a game that brings poverty, poverty that de- 
velops into crime, crime that often results in tragic death. 

Of the human atoms thai constitute the audience to be des 

ried o this Webster Btreet pitfall, only a lew shon thai in their 

warfare with the ponies they have not forgotten the cardinal 



July 4, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



31 



duties of man: to be cleau, shaved and shod. Mosl of them, 
in their hopeless, helpless battle with the game, have been 30 

liiml-pressed that they forgot to keep their wardrobes in repair, 
hoarding their half dollars in order to the better engage in their 
light for a winning. Many of the men I noticed wire in business, 
some few work as clerks, the remainder eke out a scant liveli- 
hood by occasional labor, live economically, "from hand to 
month," in order to have enough to take a "flyer" on a good 
thing in the hope of making a "hit." The ambition to make a 
killing furnishes the life ambition of many of the race followers; 
some of the old fellows T met have seen twenty years come and go 
during which they have held on to the hope like the drowning 
swimmer grasping the traditional straw, that by some whim 
of necromancy they would, one day, make a slaughter that would 
shock the pool-room boss, and put them, purse-full, on "easy 
street" for the remainder of their days. What a woe-begone, 
pathetic spectacle these old fellows present. Their trowser-legs 
ragged, their hair unkempt, their collars awry, they deny them- 
selves many of life's actual necessities in order to be able to 
make a bet. Many of them have been separated from their wives 
and children because they lacked strength of character enough to 
resist the temptation to dabble in "racing stocks," and so they 
have gone downward on the human ladder until they find the 
weakness to bet has developed into a disease for which they 
seem unable to find a cure. 

In the midst of this exhibition of aggravated human misery, 
I saw no sign of sympathy, nothing was apparent save a cold- 
blooded, undisguised endeavor to win on the part of the pool- 
room personnel, and when, in an occasional instance, the house 
was stuck for a bet of a few dollars, Wilson or his deputies paid 
out the lowest price it was possible to induce the winner to accept. 

In New York, that wondrous metropolis where humankind 
from every corner of the universe congregate, pool-rooms that 
had been in open operation for a score of years now stand tenant- 
less and gloomy, because after a stirring crusade against the 
vice of race betting the laws were so strictly enforced that it 
took a gambling boss with more than ordinary temerity to defy 
the mandates of the police and run his shack after the order 
to bar the door was elucidated. Following the passage of Gov- 
ernor Hughes's bill to taboo helling at the race tracks came a 
coincident campaign against the pool dives; and although the 
diamond-burdened gentlemen who prosper on the folly and weak- 
ness of the army of men who are slaves to the "game" amalga- 
mated to oppose the movement directed against them, their cor- 
ruption fund proved futile, and they were forced to the wall. 

In Louisiana, the people, conscious of the crime and miser] 
induced by the swindling "sport," rose in indignation against 
the wide-open game, and blacklisted the betting feature at the 
I racks; 

Which State will he the ncxl to follow the lead admirably taken 
by New York? Tt is up to California. Kentucky, the home of 
the thoroughhred and "rye," would reflect great credit upon it- 
self if it should .1--.1 \ to profit b] thi holj example of the Knick- 
erbocker city, and admit its need of civic sterilizing; but there 
are some things we can hardly expect 'if Kentucky. With C 
fornians, though, we see no reason why steps should not be taken 

at Once to wipe out the m08t pernicious and damning system that 

drives man to despair, poverty, crime and destruction. 



MURPHY GRANT & CO. 

Wholesale Dry Goods 

N. E. Cor. Market and Sansome Sts., San Francisco. Cal. 
NVw tantly arriving ami on sal« at our tern: 

■ 
\\. will occups N, E. Cor. Sansome and Bush 

streets, about July 15th. 



Fairmont* 
Hotel 



Speaker Cannon did not have a look-in at the Vice- 
Presidential nomination. The men who framed the cut and dried 
dope did it well, and the people are glad that Tail has n 
ited down with House o 
greas, The corner grocery is his place for life. Don't ever let 
that marplot and obstructionist appear again in our legislative 



The Reverend Doctor Henson, an Eastern cleric, 

that it was the Divine intention that man should ultimately con- 
9 and fly. Mr. Bryan believes that with 
i n run on occasions. He tried it and finds the 
exhilarating. 



Superbly situated. 
Magnificently appointed. 
Perfectly served. 

In every aspect approaching nearest to the IDEAL 
hotel. Managed by the world famous 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 



DON'T FORGET IT! 

Cafe Madden 

236-240 Turk Street., San Francisco 

Madden's will be the most beautiful dining place ever 
seen in the West. It will seat one thousand people, 
and embody all the latest features in decorative and 
culinary art. 

NOW OPEN 

Under the Management of JOHN A. MADDEN 
Formerly with the Palace and St. Francis Hotels 



St*. Sauveur Apartments 

1276 JONES, S. E.COR. CLAY STREET.Marine view, 
4 and 5 room flats. Every convenience. 
WOLF & HOLLMAN, Agents, 327 Kearny St. 



Russ Cafe m. owens, prop. 

235 MONTGOMERY ST. (RUSS BLDG.) 

The Down Town, "Up-to-Date" Cafe for ladies and gentle- 
men. Finest, wines, beers and liquors served. 



JULES 



■ OPEN EVENINGS. INCLUDING SUNDAYS 

MUSIC SUNDAYS 

RESTAURANT 

at, 326 BUSH STREET, Bet.. Kearny and Montgomery SU. 

PHOSE KEARNY 1813 

DINNER. SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS 
DINNER. With wine, 75c With wine. $1 .00 



Writing «lw«ra in sight. 

L. &M. ALEXANDER&CO. 

EXCLVSIVE PACIFIC COAST DEALERS 

L. C. Smith 8 Bros. Typewriter 

RECENT SALES: 

W. .ml J. SLOAN * CO. 

ANGLO < AL1FORNUS BANK 

STANDARD OIL CO. 

WESTERS UNION TELEGRAPH CO. 

UNION TRUST BANK 

Send Foe Descriptive Cattlogue 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

512 Market street, San Francisco 

Telephone Douglas 2157 




"A FAIR FACE MAY PROVE A FOUL BAR- 
GAIN." MARRY A PLAIN GIRL1FSHE USES 

SAPOLIO 



33 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



•Tuly .\ ? ions. 




The Colorado 






New and 


Up-To-Date 




RATES FROM $5.00 TO $ 10.00 PER WEEK 
Rooms Single or Ensuite All Cars to the Door 
220 i-2 Pacific Avenue Phone Main 336 


MRS. N. L. WEEKS 




SANTA CRUZ. CAL 



Close to all Railway and Steamship Offices. 150 Rooms--ioo with Private Bath 

A New Class A absolutely Fireproof Buildtnc, with every modern 

convenience. Steam Heat and Telephone in everv room. 

The Hotel Holland 



EUROPEAN PLAN 



A Strictly First Class Family Hotel 

Ellis street, between Powell and Mason, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



E. L. YOUNG, Manager 



Telephone Temporary 4380 



AP\ a 


New 


mtk 


Poodle 


& ■♦ - "LI. 


Dog 




Restaurant 


M "/"s 


and 


^4« 


U 1 N. W. Corner 

" 0teI Polk 8 Post Sts. 


■^ <\ ^^*^^ 


Phone Sis Francisco 




Franklin 2960 



Thompson's 
Annex 



SERVE AN 
IDEAL 



40c 



LUNCHEON 
O'Farrell near Fillmore 



Mt. Tamalpais and Muir Woods 

TWO TRIPS, entirely different. To the summit of a high mountain; 

to the heart of a great forest. Trees 18 feet in diameter, 200 feet high. 

"TAVERN OF TAMALPAIS" and "Mair Tawn" 

At the Summit In the Woods 

Via Sausalito Ferry, foot of Market Street. See San Francisco daily papers for 
Time Card. 



Old Poodle Dog Restaurant 

824-826 Eddy St., ne*r Van Ness Ave. Formerly at Buah St., 
cor. Grant Avenue. Phone Franklin 63. 



Geyser Stage Line 



Paraiso Hot* Springs 

[OFFICIAL HOTEL-AMERICAN MOTOR LEACUE1 

Grandest and most accessible of all resorts. Only 1-2 
hour ride, in hotel auto, over a beautiful road. Waters 
awarded first prize at St. Louis Exposition. Wonderful 
natural hot baths and mineral waters. Expert masseurs, 
large new swimming tank and other improvements. New 
SUN BATH, the only one on the Coast. 

H. H. McGOWAN, Prop. 



SUMMER AT 



Pizmo Beach 



'NOT AN IDLE MINUTE.' 



on the Coast* 



Hold your conventions and club outings at Pizmo! 
Yon can live at the Inn for $2.50 per day. Special weekly and 
monthly rates. 
Elegantly furnished Tents in Tent-city for $6.00 per week for two. 

Fishing. Boating, Bathing, Autolng, Bowling, Tennis, Horseback 
Riding through the mountains; Clam Digging. 

Two large bathing pavilions, with warm plunge. 

The beach at Pizmo is one -quarter of a mile wide, and seventeen 
miles long. And is noted amoner the autolsts as the Ormond of the 
"West. 

Ask any Southern Pacific agent about summer excursion rates, 
or write Pizmo Beach Resort, 789 Market street. 



SANTA CRUZ 



THE WORLD'S MOST BEAUTIFUL PLAYGROUND 



ELECTRIC ILLUMINATIONS, THE FAMOUS CASINO GRILL, FIREWORKS 
from the Big Ship BALBOA. 

Two Big Famous Brass Bands, Orchestras, Etc. The Famous Big 
Trees, Scenic Mountains. 

Largest and most magnificent Casino and Natatorium. Climate with- 
out an Equal. 



NEVER A DULL MOMENT FROM JUNE 20th 
TO OCTOBER 1st- 



Hotel Westminster *!£&£* 

American Plan 

REOPENED 

Rates Per Day, $2.50 Rooms without Bath 
Rooms with Bath $3.00, $3.50 and $4.00 

European Plan 

SI .00 per day and up 
With bath SI. 50 an\ip 

F. O. JOHNSON, Proprietor 



Headquarters at Smith's Stable. First-class livery. 
West St., CLOVERDALE, Cal. 



Hotel St. James 



OPPOSITE ST. JAMES PARK 

SAN JOSE 

Recognized headquarters for automobile parties. 

ALBERT BETTENS, Prop. R. M. BETTENS. M«r. 



Napa Soda Springs now open 

California's famous mountain Spa, only 50 miles from San Fran- 
cisco. The nearest watering place and summer resort to the city. 
1,000 feet elevation, overlooking for 25 miles the beautiful Napa 
Valley. Good hotel accommodations. New skating rink. Terms 
on application to JOHN JACOBS, Proprietor, Napa Soda Springs, 
Napa County. California. 



Seigler Hot* Springs 

Newly Renovated and Refurnished Throughout — Many New Im- 
provements. Natural hot baths for rheumatism, malaria, etc. ; 
wonderful stomach waters; Greatest Arsenic Beauty Bath in the 
State; swimming pond. Baths free. Rates $10 to $14. Livery in 
connection. Information at Peck-Judah's, 789 Market street, or 
address W. E. CATHIE, Seigler, Lake County, Cal. 



Original White Sulphur 



St.. Helena, 
Napa Co. 



Select, quiet home; moderate prices; good table; furnished cot- 
tages; ideal spots for tents and camping; 3:30 p. m. train; no 
change; electric road open. Secure rooms early. 

MR. and MRS. J. SANDFORD. 



Lake County, 

California 



Soda Bay Springs 

Situated on the picturesque shore of Clear Lake. Season opens 
May 1st. Finest of boating, bathing, hunting and fishing; un- 
surpassed accommodations; new launch accommodating 40 people, 
built expressly for the use of guests and excursions. Terms: $2 
per day; $12 per week; special rates to families. Take Tiburon 
Ferry, 7:40 a. m., thence by rail to Pieta, thence stage or automo- 
bile direct to springs. Round trip, good for six months, $9. Further 
information, address managers, GEO. ROBINSON and AGNES 
BELLE RHOADS, Soda Bay Springs. Lake County, Cal., via Kel- 
seyville Postoffice, or Peck-Judah Bureau, 7E9 Market St., S. F. 



Saratoga Springs 



The Paradise of California. For health and pleasure; 15 different 
mineral springs; positive cure for liver, kidney and stomach; rates 
from $10 to $16 per week; furnished cottages for house-keeping. 
For information and booklet applv Peck-Judah's, 789 Market street. 
San Francisco, or J. MARTENS, Prop., Bachelor P. O.. Lake 
County, California. 



Vichy Springs 








Three miles from Ukiah, 


Mendocino 


County. 


Curative 


waters, Neuheim Baths, 


hunting. 


fishing; 


first-class 


table. J. A. REDEMEYER, Prop. 







Agua Caliente Springs 

Send your family to the nearest Hot Sulphur Springs to San 
Francisco. First-class accommodations. Special rates to families. 
No staging. Four trains daily. Fare, round trip, $1.65. Tiburon 
ferry or Oakland; two hours* ride. Caliente Water, bottled here. 
can be had at all first-class places. Address. THEODORE 
RICHARDS, Agua Caliente, Sonoma Co., California. 



Hotel Rowardennan 



Now Open. For further informa- 
tion see Peck-Judah Information 
Bureau, 789 Market St., or write 

B. DICKINSON, Prop., 
Ben Lomond, Cal. 




I IN 



Idealizing California Country Life. 
All roads to Aetna Springs now open to automobiles. Special 
automobile service from St. Helena to Springs. Just the place for 
the family. Reservations now being made. Rates and literature 
on application. AETNA SPRINGS CO., Aetna Springs, Napa Co., 
California. 



Beach Hill Inn 



Persons desiring a nice, quiet place, go to Beach Hill Inn. Ar- 
tistic furnishings, elegant rooms, extensive grounds, overlooking 
the beach; improved since last year. Address MISS A. PORTER, 
Santa Cruz. 







The Greatest* Health 
and Pleasure Resort* 




|0 


ffl 


in America. 

Positive cure for rheu- 
matism and stomach 
trouble. Natural min- 
eral and steam baths. 
Hot mineral plunge and 
tub baths. Table un- 
surpassed. Rates, $12 
to $14 per week. The 
roads have been put In 
excellent shape for stag- 


IIILmot springs 


Ing and automobiles. 
Round- trip ticket $8. 
via Northwestern Pacific R. R. For further particulars, address, 
R. H. CURRY, Proprietor, Sonoma Co., California. 



Mark West Warm Springs; 



, SONOMA 
, ^0 * COUNTY 

Only 3 1-2 hours from San Francisco and but 7 miles' staging. 
Meet trains of N. W. Pacific at Fulton both morning and evening. 
Round trip only $3.75. Now owned and conducted by J. F. Mul- 
grew, for the past 13 years at Skaggs Springs, who refers, with 
confidence, to any one of his guests of the past. Nine mineral 
springs; superb boating and swimming; famous wild grape vine 
arbors — one 50 by 170 feet, covering hotel veranda and driveway. 
"The prettiest place in California" is the verdict of thousands. Can 
now accommodate 200. Fine table. My own dairy and garden. All 
amusements. Fine trout streams. Rates, $2 a day. or $12 a week. 

Address, J. F, MULGREW, Fulton, Cal. 



Howard Springs 

First Lithia springs in the State; also hot Iron. Sulphur and 
Borax; Plunge F>aths; Hot and Cool Magnesia. S. P. Co. to Calls- 
toga. Address MISS C. WHEELER, Howard Springs, Lake Co., or 
Peck-Judah Bureau, 789 Market street, San Francisco. $10 to $16. 



JULY 

THE MATCHLESS MONTH AT 

Hotel Del Monte 

Golf, Motoring, Sailing, Fishing, Bathing, 
Riding. Low Hotel rates «3 to JS.50 
per day American plan. Make your res- 
ervations NOW. 

H. R. WARNER., 

Manager Del Monte 

or 789 Market Street, San Francisco. 



PHONE* DOUGLAS IJ^-THIS* *> 

STRICTLY ONE PRICE 

SING CHONG CO., inc. 

CHINESE AND JAPANESE BAZAAR 
Cloisonne. Satsuma. Bronze. Porcelain Wares. Silk 
and Linen. Embroideries. Kimonos. Dress Patterns. 
Silk Underwear. Jade Stone Jewelry. Ebony Furniture, 
etc. 601-611 Dupont Street. Cor. California. San Fran- 
cisco [Chinatown;. Cal. 












Me- 

The 

Egyptian 
Cigarette 
9/ Quality 

AR.OMAT1C DELICACY 

MILDNESS 

PURITY 

At your Club or Dealer's or 
THE SURBRUQ CO., Makers, New York 







SUMMER RESORTS 



BY DAYLIGHT AND 
ALL RAIL TO 



Yosemite Valley" 

VIA 

Southern Pacific 



By way of Merced in connection with the Yosemite Valley R. R. 
Only 10 hours' ride to El Portal (the edge of the Valley), and three 
and one-half hours thence to the Heart of the Valley. 

Low side trip rates to Wawona and the Mariposa Grove of gigan- 
tic sequoias. 

Leave San Francisco daily 8.20 a. m. 



Ask any of our agents for details, or write CHARLES S. FEE, 
passenger traffic manager Southern Pacific Company, San Fran- 
cisco, for beautifully illustrated descriptive literature. 



Klamath Hot Springs 

In the mountains of Northern California, is noted for Its fine cli- 
mate, fishing, hunting and mineral waters. Apply to Peck-Judah 
Co., 789 Market street. San Francisco, or to Edson Bros., Bes- 
wlck, Siskiyou County. Cal. 




Auto Stage from Pieta 75 minutes. 

150 Rooms. Electric lights. 30 mineral springs. Won- 
derfully curative. 
Unsurpassed cuisine. 
Complete garage and automobile supplies. 

NEW MANAGEMENT 

For reservations and further particulars address 

P. F. KOHNKE, Lessee and Manager 
C. E. ZINKAND, Assistant. Manager 

or Peck Judah Information Bureau, 789 Market. Street, S. F. 




PLAN TO VISIT 



YOSEMITE 
VALLEY 



THIS SEASON 

NOW REACHED BY RAIL 

A quick, comfortable trip. An Ideal outing amid the grandeurs of Yosemite 



For through tickets and connections 
See Southern Pacific or Santa Fe Agent 

or Addrcu 0. W. LEHMER, Traffic Manner, MerctJ, C.I. 



GILROY HOT SPRINGS 

OPEN THE YEAR ROUND. 

ACCESSIBILITY. — The keynote to our success. Only 4 hours 
from San Francisco, including delightful stage ride over the best 
kept mountain road In California. Unsurpassed table, superb ser- 
vice, health-healing waters, telephone, post-offlce, ideal climate. 

The waters contain sulphur, alum, iron, soda, magnesia. Iodine 
and traces of arsenic, and are very efficacious In cures of rheuma- 
tism, neuralgia, rheumatic gout, kidney and liver diseases, lead 
and mercurial poisoning, and all bladder and urinary complaints. 
Hunting and trout fishing. Rates $12 to $17.50 a week; baths free. 
Trains leave Third and Townsend streets at 9 a. m. Direct stage 
connection. Send for booklet or see Peck-Judah, 789 Market St. 

W. J. McDONALD, Proprietor. 



Lake County, 

California 



Anderson Springs 

The greatest resort for health and pleasure; the only natural 
mineral steam baths in Lake County. Natural Hot Sulphur and 
Iron Baths. Board — $10 to $14 per week. No extra charge for 
baths. How to reach the Springs — Take Oakland ferry at 7:30 
a. m., or Steamer Monticello, and Napa Valley Electric R. R. to 
St. Helena, auto stage to springs, fare $6.55. arrive 1*2.30 for lunch, 
or S. P. train to Calistoga, arrive 11.30 for lunch; Spiers stage to 
springs; fare $6.80; arrive at Anderson Springs at 4 p. m.. distance 
21 miles. Fare, $7 round trip from San Francisco. Address all 
communications to J. ANDERSON, Anderson Springs, Mlddletown, 
Lake County, Cal. 







'a 

e 



■ *5- 



tfiSfc^ 






K| 









*fc 







* 



|<5 



b- a 



-A 8 

- I 

■-" £ 

O !» 

5 " 

'< . 






STATEMENT 

of the Condition and Value of the Assets and Liabilities 

OF 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

(A CORPORATION) 

and where said assets are situated 

DATED JUNE 30, 1908 



ASSETS 



1 — Bonds of the United States, of the District of 
Columbia, of the State of California and Municipalities 
, : ereof, the actual value of which is J9,10S,6 

2 — Cash in United States Gold and Silver Coin and 

Checks 2,598.899.8!) 

3 — Miscellaneous Bonds, the actual value of which is.. 4.3 48,828.50 
They are: "San Francisco and North Pacific Railway 
Company 5 per cent Bonds" ($75,000.00). "Southern 
Pacific Branch Railway Company of California 6 pet- 
cent Bonn's" (§98,000.00). "Northern California Rail- 
way Company 5 per cent Bonds" ($83,000.00). "Los An- 
geles Pacific Railroad Company of California Refund- 
ing 5 per cent Bonds" ($400,000.00). "Los Angeles Rail- 
way Company of California 5 per cent Bonds'' ($86,- 
000.00), ".Market Street Cable Railway Company 6 per 

mi B Ib" i >130, 000.00). "Market Street Railway 

Company First Consolidated Mortgage 5 per cent 
Bonds" ($753,000.00) "Powell Street Railway Com- 
pany 6 per cent Bonds" ($185,000.00), "The Omnibus 
Cable Company 6 per cent Bonds'! ($167, 000.00). Sutter 
street Railway Company '■ per cent Bonds" <$l50,ooo.0(n, 
"Presidio and Ferries Railroad Company 6 per cent 
Bonds" ($14,000.00), "Ferries and Cliff House Railway 
Company '5 per cent Bonds" ($6,000.00). "The Merchants 
Exchange 7 per cent Bonds" ist.snn.ooo.OO), "San Fran- 

cisco Gas and Electric C pany, i 1 - pei cent B I 

($491,000.00. i 

4 — Promissory Notes am) tic debts thereby secured 
(including due and iQllected Interest, $185.668.68.) 36,429,048.66 

The condition "1" said Promissnry Notes and debts Is 
as follows: They are all existing Contracts, owned by 
said Corporation, and are payable to It at Its office, 

which is situated at the corner of Market, McAllister 

and .Tones streets, in the City and County of San 
Francisco. Slate of California, and the payment thereof 
is secured by First Mortgages on Real Estate within 
this State. Said Promissory Notes are kept and held 
by said Corporation at its said office, which is its 
principal place of buslne&s, and said Notes and debts 
are there "situated. 

5 — Contingent Fund — In (.rest accrued on Bonds but 
not yet payable 89.144.13 

6 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, 
the actual value of which is 394,629.00 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and debts is 
as follows: They are all existing Contracts, owned by 
said Corporation, and are payable to it at its office, 
which is situated as aforesaid, and the payment there- 



cured by pledge and hypothecation of Bonds of 
Railroad and Quasi-Public Corporations and other se- 
curities. 

7— <a) Real Estate situated In the City and County Df 

of San Francisco ($139,986.18), and In th ntlea 

of Santa Clara ($28,448.95), Ui la I 30,181.94), and 

San Mat $2,281.67), this State, the actual value of 

which is 

(b) The Land and Building in which said Corpora- 
thin keeps Its said office, the actual value of which is 

The condition of said Real Estate is that it belongs 
t.i said corporation, and pari of it is productive. 



Ti iTAl, ASSETS $53,966,226 16 



All the foregoing Assets are situated within the State of California. 

LIABILITIES 

1 — Said Corporation nn>s Deposit* am ting to and 

thi actual value ot which Is (50.379.393.6S 

The condition or said nepnsits is that they are pay- 
able only out of said Assets and are fully - ured 
thereby. 

2 — Accrued Interest — Interest "" Bonds accrued and 
not yet payable S9.144.13 

3— Reserve Fund. Actual Value 8,497.687.37 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $53. M0. 225.15 



THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS IND LOAN SOCIETY, 

By JAMES R. KELLY, President 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

By E. J. TOBIN. Acting Secretary. 



STATE OP CALIFORNIA. City and County of San Francisco, ss 
james R. KELLY and E. J. TOBIN, being each duly aworn, 
each for himself, says: That the said JAMES R. KELLY is Presi- 
dent, and that said E. J. TOBIN Is Acting Secretary of THE 

HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. the corpon 

above mentioned, and that the. toregolng statement Is true. 

JAMES R. KELLY. President. 

E. J. TOBIN, Acting S 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 2d day of July. 1909 

CHARLES T. STANLEY. Notary Public. 
In and for the City and County of San Francisco. State nf Cali- 
fornia, 







g&w rf^Niito^ 




<&%lifffxni&l(b , fftxt%ztT~ 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 

The News Letter Is a member California Periodical Publishers' Association. 



VOL. LXXVI 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 11, 1908 



No. 2 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 773 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Temporary 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Fost-offlce as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where Information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, representative. 
-London office — 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication in 
the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 



The weather through out California in May and June 

has been delightful, and July begins in the same way. 

An editorial headline in the Examiner on Tuesday aays: 

"The Last of the Bad Men is Gone!" What? How? What's 
happened to Willie? 

Tn order to blacken Herrin, the Call is willing to pick any 

kind of a stinking fish to throw at the railroad man. Ilea's 
is the latest protege of the Call. 

The day will yet come when the municipality will make 

of the great national holiday a municipal matter, and then we 
will have celebrations that are worth while. 

Judge Alton B. Parker, the great American dodo, has 

gracefully given way for the groat American hoo-doo, Mr. Wil- 
liam Jennings Bryan. There is to be no conflict, 

It would be an excellent news item if the Call were to 

publish as a fact that Mr. ('. W. Hornick, Mr. E. Simpson and 
Mr. John I). Spreckels have never traveled on a railroad pass. 
What? 

During the heated spell, the.} are dealing on! "canned 

sermons" to the congregations of Chicago churches. This Ls 
a practical idea to allow the minister to take e vacation whilst 
his parishioners take a foretaste of Hell! 

Speaking of an "affinitj professor" who has had to 

to hard work, the Examiner says: "Bui worse than mere an 
moralists are men who use public educational positions to spread 
their disgusting doctrines." Whew! Here's an editor who will 

gel his ! 

In the Eracas on the Mexican line il is n< news- 
paper man gets his in the shape of a bullet wound in i 
skirmish. Discriminating people will applaud the shooting while 
deploring the facl that the marksman did uol shoot higher. An\ 
one who goes about poking his nose in oilier people's afl 
deservedly the subject of attack. [I was none of his business. 

The Spanish heir is a lustj boy. He yelled like blazes 

a few minutes after his birth, demonstrating the facl thai he has 

not inherited the weak lungs of his pater. The \\Ynin-Hano\ei- 
anuer strain is a strong Teutonic, beer-loving and pipe-smoking 
infusion, and it will have a good and lasting effect on the Span- 
ish line. 

The pia : a and porch of the summer hotel is now the 

most popular place to hold conversations, but the speech i 

all original. Had it been copyrighted by the inven- 
tor, there would be an opportunity for a million dan 
minute. "Does 'oo loi i lovee lovi - a trite 

thing, but it is being used threadbare this minute. This 
variably followed by a noise like the [lulling ol *>t out 

of the mud with a finale like the "bleeding" of ihe air in 
train of freiah, outh and 



It is said that the savings banks of Bussia will take up 

$35,000,000 of the new loan. The idea is kept prevalent by the 
hysterica] daily press thai the peasant of "Russia is always one of 
the near-starving kind. When it is necessary to float a Govern- 
ment loan, he immediately becomes a bloated capitalist, and his 
hoarded kopeks come to the front. 

Helen (iould's sweetness and good sense make up for all 

the moral lapse, the stupidity or the cunning of the black sheep 
among the rest Could anything be more American than this 
American way of dealing with her sister's marriage: "While I 
have signed this legal document in order not to deprive my sis- 
ter of her pari of a fortune, T feel it due to myself to say here 
that I deeply regret the contemplated marriage." 

The common, every-day people of California are not con- 
spicuously taking much 9tock in the holy-joeing of the Lincoln- 
Roosevelt League or Ihe pravcrl'ul effort of the reformed Demo- 
cracy : and after all il is the Common, everv-dav citizen that turns 
the trick for "reform." Mr. Spreckels, however, will have to 
show his Republican fellow citizens that he is not hiring Mr. 
Iienev. a Democrat, to butcher the Republican party in Cali- 
fornia to make a Spreckels holiday, before hi can convince those 
Republicans thai he is as far above suspicion or reproach as the 
wife of Caesar oughl to have been; and Theodore Bell will have 
to relieve himself of the charge that he is trying to down McNab 
in the interest of Kill Hearst before he can hope to convince the 
mass of the Denioei-.n- ihat he is a more trusty boss than Mc- 
Nab. Reformer Spreckels *nd Reformer Bell! Hell's full of 

such "reformers." and the pitch is still hot. 

David Starr .Ionian has l c .ft us lo revel in a continued 

gab-fest. II- - dated for some town in South I ind has 

an engagement lor e Wagging of the jaws of him every <l 

two w© - to Colorado Springs and Den- 

ver. Jordan is in many way a remarkable man. bul he has surelj 

missed his vocation. He should have started out in fife 

ambulating compendium of useful information. I 
have heard him referred to as a peal by men who respected his 
writing, bul who deplore. 1 his speech-making. Any one who has 

hirty-live ininule speech by the head- 
liner at Stanford will join me in voting Jordan a failure. Why 
is it that advisors enlarge their prerogatives always, and from 
- with superficial knowledge of geography or 
philolog should then aspire to know all about the sciences 

or nial, dty of ichb clinching claim to 6 

tion? 

There was a time in the history of the American republic 

when had a voice in the nomination of Candida 

the presidency. That privilege no longer inheres in the popular 
suffrage; everything i = "lived" before the national conventions 
issemble, and as between the Republican ami Men 
- the voters 

candidate that was "embalmed" and one that was 
■■canned." Thafs ion in a "free democracy," ian'l 

In m\ ipinion ihe end is not far nlT: from a condi- 

tion in which • nd for the mastery, to 

which an .1 shall rule with 

my and n ride. Riot, rebellion, revo- 

lution are the natural consequence, and the man on bo 
may ride through an trmageddnn of 
■ mounts 

. 




Ruef is Let Free on Bail and the Prosecution Fails to Imprison the Mayor's 
Friend. Railroads Should Build Overhead Crossings. A Multiplicity of 

Avoidable Accidents. The Social Melange. Exclusive Automobile News. 



The policies of the Bulletin would 
News and Imaginations, bo more comprehensible if it gave it- 
self a sub-title reading "The Imagi- 
nations of Fremont Older.'' To such a source only can much of 
the alleged "news" published by the airship organ be traced. In 
the past the Spreckels Prosecution has been pregnant with live 
news : for some months its barrenness has been patent. There is, 
however, a standing rule in the establishments of yellow journals, 
"Tf you cannot get news, make it." And for some time Man- 
aging Editor Older and his bright young men have been busy 
in the manufacture of spurious "stories" designed not only to 
whet popular interest, but to inflame public passion against those 
citizens whom the Bulletin has been subsidized to destroy. If 
it had not been for the intervention of more sober and far-seeing 
minds. Older might still be busy writing letters to himself, 
threatening his own person with assassination and the Bulletin 
building with demolition. But Older was warned by his friend? 
that this was not only a dangerous game, but was being played 
too clumsily to deceive any one. From the dastardly plots of 
imaginative dynamitards, whose chimerical existence so luridly 
suggested the dauntless heroism of Fremont Older, the resource- 
ful journalist turned to organize a "Civic Conscience Fund." 
The subscription list has been open for one month, and a suffi- 
cient sum to pay Detective Burns's personal expenses for about 
one week has been raised. Significantly enough, half the total 
amount has come from the purse of a relative of one of the lead- 
ers of the prosecution. The balance is credited to various anony- 
mous contributors, such as "A Poor Washerwoman," for whom 
the Bulletin's young men indite passionate epistles. 



When nobody could be found fool- 
Ruef's Many Boles. ish enough to molest the sacred per- 

son of Fremont Older, except Mr. 
Older himself, when interest faded in Burns's "poison pouring" 
plots with dynamitards, when "Big Jim" Gallagher could no 
longer command the center of the stage as a perpetually escap- 
ing hero, and while Heney was gaining more than sufficient self- 
advertisement by making his own noise in the police court, the 
ingenuity of the evening organ of the Spreckels Prosecution was 
strained to provide the desirable sense ion. But on the eve of 
Judge Dunne's failure to prevent Ruef securing bail, the Older- 
ian imagination once more proved itself equal to the occasion. 
Ruef has been the villain and hero in so many tragedies, come- 
dies and farces, of fact and fiction, that it was comparatively 
easy in invent one more new role for him. In turn, he has been 
the crafty corrupter of guileless Supervisors, the bandit at the 
throat of every corporation or individual forced to do business 
with the city, the meek and tearful penitent (in the subtle melo- 
drama staged by Burns in the Dunne theatre) pledged to reform 
and to champion the regeneration of the city, the right hand of 
the sanctified Prosecution in its crusade against, the "higher- 
ups:" then the base betrayer of a sacred cause, the shameless 
traducer of Heney and Burns, those pinnacles of veracity, and 
finally a fearsome assassin. In all these roles — if their au- 
thors are to be believed — Ruef has experienced hair-breadth es- 
capes at the hands of those who were to wrest him from the 
sumptuous custody of the Prosecution to kidnap or to slay him. 
while, on the other hand, he has, of late, been the arch villain 
plotting the assassination of his former friends and advisers. 
But the most far-fetched part composed by the Bulletin for 
Ruef's portrayal in its pages was announced in an "extra" last 
week. From Older's fevered imagination came a throbbing tale 
that just as soon as Ruef was admitted to bail he had planned 
to escape. The whole plot had been carefully arranged — in 



Older's mind. Not one jot or tittle of evidence was produced to 
show the existence of such a plot anywhere else. Tts unreason- 
ableness was transparent to any one who has made even a cursory 
study of Ruef's character. For escape would mean forfeiture 
of Ruef's million and a half of property, and Ruef, it is well 
known, would rather face crucifixion itself than such a contin- 
gency. The Bulletin has destroyed its usefulness as a publisher 
of the news, and its fairy tales no longer even interest the public. 
But its managing editor should be in some demand as an author 
of imaginative plots for consumption at the temples of melo- 
drama. 



L\m;oon's Private 
Practice. 



Additional light was shed this week 
on the surrender of the District At- 
torney's office to Mr. Spreekels's pri- 
vate prosecutor, Francis J. Heney. 
Hitherto it has been assumed that Mr. Langdon was not per- 
mitted to appear in any proceedings of consequence in the graft 
prosecution because of his incompetency and his inability to pose 
as more than a tallow dip by the side of Heney's effulgent bril- 
liance. But the following official announcement made by the 
Call supplies yet another explanation: "Since Langdon has been 
in the District Attorney's office he has engaged in private prac- 
tice, and now expects, at the conclusion of his term, to give his 
undivided attention to civil practice." Curious taxpayers once 
more may want to know why Mr. Langdon continues to draw a 
salarv from the city; why he maintains an automobile at the pub- 
lie expense, and why, with his attention so divided, the Super- 
visors should have shown such confidence in him by voting an 
appropriation of $70,000 as a special fund for the use of his 
office. 



The appellation of "Atlantic Fleet" 
Claiming a Mtstery. for the battleships now in the Paci- 
fic does not sit well on the San 
Francisco News Letter, which says "it is nothing of the kind." 
"Tt is the Pacific fleet," it goes on rather oracularly, "and most 
of the vessels in it will remain in the Pacific indefinitely. The 
reference to the battleship section of the Pacific fleet as the 
"Atlantic" Fleet is due to two causes. One is the desire to throw 
a sop to the narrow-minded, selfish people of the Fast, who roared 
energetically when it was ordered to the Pacific. The other, and 
a deeper one, is the guessing that is aroused among certain for- 
eign nations as to the exact mission and movements of the battle- 
ship fleet. Beneath the memorable cruise and the disposition of 
our navy at this time, there is something which the Federal ad- 
ministration does not care to divulge just now." — Army and 
N/iri/ Journal. 

While it cannot altogether conceal some chagrin, it is to be 
observed that our highly esteemed and reliable technical contem- 
porary docs not undertake to combat the News Letter's opinion. 



"The man who asked the question — 
Bryan and the Negro, if he is a black man voting the Re- 
publican ticket or a white Republi- 
can — cannot in justice ask it. But I will answer it frankly ami 
tell you that the white man in the South puts on that qualifica- 
tion as a matter of self-protection, and that there is not a Re- 
publican community in the North that would not put it on when 
necessary. The man who says that the people of the North have 
anv dilVei-eni idea of this subject from the people of the South 
is lacking in frankness with himself, or he assumes what would 
not be true. The white race in the North and in the South will 
uol permit a few men to take the solid black vote and use it as 



July 11, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



: ' ip ty for the making of mone} regardless of the wel 
fare of the community, and thai was done in the South. The 
South is giving the black man better law than the black man 
would give the white man in the South if the black man mad 
the law." 

This is Mr, Bryan's position as li> the negro, ami il is an emi- 
nently cnnvri one. li will commend itself in thinking men, 
black and white. 



I's^i OHOLOQIC M 

Willow Wands. 



While there are no degrees in mir- 
acles, no grades in impossibilities, 

while a little undoable is as difficult 
to do as a big one, these are shades 
nf idiocies, various phases of asininity, and we are inclined I" 
pronounee the present conduct of the Berkeley Psychical Re- 
aearch Society the mature and ultimate development of the most 
aggravated phase. We have been called upon to chronicle so 
much ineffable nonsense that we felt ourselves anything but 
wanting in the vernacular belonging to the most intensified 
symptoms of lunacy till invited tn do justice to this Berkeley out- 
break of slobbering idiocy. Suppose a herd of Southern rice- 
field niggers, led by their preacher, armed with a "gopher boi- 
tle" Idled with dried lizzards, rusty nails and a rabbit foot, were 
on this rampage. Would it not be credited to inherited Afri- 
can fetishism? Yet within the shadows cast by the. academic 
groves of our State University, we behold educated ladies and 
gentlemen trailing after Professor Joseph Voyle, that intellec- 
tual bell-wether in the procession of fools. And for what! The 
professor has convinced thorn that the forked stick points to a 
buried city. If there be virtue in those sticks, one fork would 
point toward Agnews, while the other would irresistibly suggest 
Napa. Did you ever notice how hard it is for a man to drop 
one nonsense without picking up another? Does it not seem 
that superstition is one of the essentials of humanity? Tn the 
sacred name of science, how much nonsense is exploited, for the 
sake of satisfying the appetite for voodooism — how many people 
stultify their reasons. Psychology is a new seience and a noble 
one, a perfect treasure house of future blessings, but in its name 
there has been more nonsense enacted than in the name nf every- 
thing wise or foolish now before the people. Yet the police 
should not molest these feeble-minded devotees until their emo- 
tiona] disorder grows into something worse. But in the mean- 
lime, let es cease to point the Snger of scorn at the Hottentot 
until our average intelligence approaches the level of stuffed 
snake worship. 



Tun AUTOMOBILE 

Amhkioanus. 



Last year, according to a veracious 
contemporary, we manufactured 

lilt. (Kin automobiles as against 55,- 
000 for Prance. 88,000 for Eng- 
l:i nil, and 32,000 for Germany. This continual suprems i 

almost every line of human endeavor i- getting somewhat 

monotonous, [t is no conjecture to predict thai in a few years 
more ihe gap between ourselves and our nearest competitor in 
the automobile industry will be immense!] 



Already it is possible to discern evi- 
An Object Lesson. dences of concern among the pool- 

room chieftains over the object les- 
son offered by the Legislature of New York in putting a ban 
upon the most pernicious svstem of legalized graft thai has been 
blossoming in this country since the davs of Tweed, of Tam- 
many Hall fame. After a struggle, the precise like of which no 
man in or about the Legislature of Albany has c. 

expects to see. the famous anti-track gambling bills became laws, 
crowning a Legislative victory, the brilliancy of which equaled 
only by its unexpectedness, is conceded even bv thot 

posed it. 

The bills, which now constitute chapters BOfi and 507 of the 
laws of 1908, in no way affect, so far as their face pi 

ile Racing Commission in particular, or horse ra 
general. They relate solely to the penalties for gambling, pool- 
selling and bookmaking, which, aa before, are declared bv tin 
law to lie "a public nuisance." Chap mends the raein j 

law bv amending that provision under which an exclusive pen- 
alty of simply recovering tit of the amount w 
I. which has applied to gambling within a rai 



enclosure, thus exempting such gambling from the penalties 
iperative elsewhere, in the Stale, and it also provides that this 
genera] penalty shall lie "imprisonment in the county jail or 
penitentiary tor a period of not more than one year," without 
alternative of a. line. 

Chapter 507 amends Ihe penal code in like manner, and in 
addition changes the grade of the crime from felony, which 
any gambling was. to that of a misdemeanor, thus bringing the 
offense within Ihe jurisdiction of the minor criminal courts. 

Up to the last moment the prevailing opinion among the fol- 
lowers of the game seemed to have been that something would 
happen to prevent the final passage of the bills. The result had 
been so close before, and there had passed so long a period of time 
between the first vole and the last, that they appeared to be sure 
that the matter "had been taken care of." 

But the "sports" reckoned without their hosts. 

What about the game in California? 

Are the Legislators blind to the necessity for prompt action to 
weed out. the rotten swindle? 



Honolulu's Ai a 

to the Fleet. 



According to press advices. Hono- 
lulu awaits the arrival of the fleet 
with bated breath. Long and earnest 
have been the discussions as lo the 
liesl method of entertaining the sailors. One party, headed bv 
a well-known minister, is in favor of inviting them lo an ice- 
cream social and offering them a bed with the Salvation Army. 
The reverend gentleman is prolific with suggestions. He points 
out the beauties of a nice walk out to Dimond Head and enthuses 
over the pleasures of a swim off Waikiki. These suggestions are 
all very well in connection with others, but one is driven to the 
belief that some of the preachers out that way know about as 
much concerning the natural recreations of a healthy young 
American as a Kanaka does about Greek. Social and compan- 
ionable enjoyments are whai a Jackie wants ashore. Walks out 
into the country to sec pretty scenery or salt water baths with 
which he is surfeited at ?ea do nut appeal to him. One is in- 
clined to think that the American navy is to be commended in 
that its personnel is not composed of such insipid, sloppy ice- 
cream and milk and water material as the minister supposes. 
The men wbe render it possible for the reverend gentleman to 
belabor the heathen with words are luckily mad'' of more virile 
material. 



There arc some people in whom the 

SOME PeOPI i - hortatory style of discourse seems to 

be inherent. In every line of their 

effusions, the inference is plain that thi ol as other 

men. From an assumed pedestal of moral or intellectual super- 
iority, they write or speak down to the uncouth multitude and 
endeavor to enlighten them. The monumental assurance of these 
twentieth century Pharisees in m IS all-sullicient to pro- 

tect them from undue criticism. The great gulf which they 
have designated as separating themselves from others is usually 
meekly aci in incontrovertible I 

The modern Jove issues his fiat, buttressed with threats of the 
visitation of his wrath on those who will not heed. S|>ecimens 
of this peculiar variety of the human species arc to be found in 
most American communities. In San Francisco, till just lately, 
they had established a veritable Reign of Terror. Two and two 
made four onlv with their consent. The guilt or innocence of a 
man was abruptly settled from the rostrum, or in the columns of 
a personal organ. In the face of this terrorism, it is gratifying 
to know that the numlier of "insurre tsed, that the 

down-trodden worm has turned a: la-t. and that the pretensions 
of these holier than thou charlatans have been thorough] 
sipated. The pronunciamei i often. 

The Pharisaic thunderbolts, which have hurtled through our 
moral atmosphere for the past two yi found to be 

harmless, and the self-righteous reformers, under the probe of 
merciless and impartial h n appear as whited sepul- 

chres. We write thus not in anger, but rather with regret for 
the crass stupidity of a clique of men who have been laboring 
under the obsession I great pnblii 

hieve the consummation of pri- 
ads. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 11. L908. 



Overhead akd 
Subway Crossings 



The accident on the Southern 
Pacific Railroad, in Oakland, where- 
by a through train crashed into a 
local and killed seven people, be- 
sides wounding many others, calls to mind the fact that over- 
head crossings or subways should he huilt hy the railroads In 
order to avoid just such casualties. The railroad managements 
may as well make up their several minds to be beforehanded in 
this matter, as it is only a question of time when they will be 
compelled to take steps to prevent a recurrence of the fearful 
loss of life of last Saturday. 



It may be argued that the railroads 

The Value of a Life, are at a continual expense to provide 
safeguards for the public, some of 
which the public eould well Bupply. The people, through their 
Legislature, have attempted to minimize the number of accidents 
hy the passage of certain laws. One of these laws is to the effect 
that wherever railroads entering a city cross the tracks of othi r 
railroads, surh railroads must stop their trains, and not proceed 
except on signal. It is staled that Harry, the engineer, did n il 
stop at all. that il has not been the custom to stop m 
semaphore signal meant •'slop." A newspaper account says thai 
Barry "did not understand the signal," and proceeded, although 
the signal plainly said "strip." Had Ihe law been obeyed, and 
the train stopped before each crossing, it is manifest there had 
been no accident at all. semaphore or no semaphore. The rail- 
road official who has the maintenance of a schcdnl his hands 

is constantly face to face with either horn of a dilemma. On 
the one hand, we have the people's mandate, through it- law-. 
that all precaution he taken to render travel safe: on Die other 

hand, the same public urges insistently a faster and yel faster 
schedule. 

The law is a sleeping thing; it has no initiative. Unless 
propelled by the action of a district attorney who knows his 
duties, or who is awakened to an appreciation of his raison i'l // 
by some sudden working of ihe public conscience, it i- a dead 

letter. The public howling for faster time on the train- i- no 
sleeping thing; il is no dead letter, and the railroad officials 
strain every nerve to carry out the public's orders. 

Tt is the result of these conditions that has brought about the 
automatic safeguards in the way of the block system and the de- 
railing switch. These are not enough, however, and it ig now up 
to the railroad companies to provide the overhead or subway 
crossing, and municipalities should not wait until the Legisla- 
ture acts. Init should pass local ordinances compelling the build- 
ing of these safeguards. The railroad official should take time 

by the forelock and immediately take the News Letter's advice 

anil go to work. One life the most useless of all those snuffed 
out on Saturday, is worth more than a whole railroad division 
and its earnings, or the railroad itself. The accident in Oak- 
land was avoidable, ami also it was possible, and is likely i" oc- 
cur again under the conditions thai obtain. Lit us make such 

accidents impossible by tie use of overhead or subw 1.1 i 



In Marin County. 



Another terrible accident was barelj 
averted in Marin County, al Reeds, 

In l he prompt action and the sprint- 
ing ability of a brakeman, A switch. had been left open or had 

been tampered with, so that if the engii r of the train on the 

siding had not discovered the fact, hundreds of lives would have 
heen lost. This would clearly have been up to the company, as 

it would have heen impossible to trace the res] sibiliry to any 

individual. Here the block system would have prevented the 
accident had it occurred. If it is possible to apprehend and con- 
vict the switchman who left that switch open, he shon 
cuted criminally and given the severest possible sentence. 



An <)i "i-oF-l ;s I'l.nri.i . Many of our Eastern visitors and 

some of ihe near-acclimated cannot 
understand, how the average Californian -lands n,,. coolness, 
chilliness, they call it. of our summer climate. The Californian 
lias always been a man of the great-out-of-doors kind. The 
Californian is an inveterate bather in cold water, a climber of 
mountains and a breather of the air of the higher altitudes. 
Consumption was unknown until the Eastern man brought it 
with him. [nsanity was unknown until the Last dumped its 
insane in California. Living out-doors and cleanliness of person 



means a larger and cleaner brain. It means an ability to do 
things, many things at one time, and do them all well. The 
Californian. not the one wdio dreads the morning chill and who 
hugs Ihe stove, is a man who does things, and his red-cheeked 
women are (he gypsies of his hills and mountains, ready for 
hike or horseback ride, and full of health and vim. Yci Cali- 
fornia is full of misanthropes and pessimists. They are nearly 
always imported. The News Letter is favored with a screed on 
the Creek Theatre hy one of these shivering wretches, against 
whom should he levied a high protective tariff to protect the 

\ ery infant ile local product. 

"Whv do Ihe people clear Iheir throats?" Hill lloi-l'olloi' 

remarked. 
"They're catching cold, they're catching cold." the man beside 

linn harked. 
"Whv do von talk so hoarse, -r, 1 'se?" Bill Hoi-1'olloi 

remarked. 
"The fog ha- gotten to my throat," the man beside him barked. 

"For they're freezing in the theatre, will can hear the noses blow. 

[t's iii Ihe balmy Bummer time, that's why they're coughing bo. 
They're putting on their overcoats and shivering in a row. 
And they're catching influenza in the theatre" 

"Why do they sil and freeze to death ?" BUI Hoi-Polloi remarked. 
"Il's classical, it's classical." the man beside him harked. 
"Why don't thev go in where it's warm," Hill Hoi-Polloi 

remarked. 

"If wouldn't he so cultured then." Ihe man behind him harked. 
"They're geti ing higher culture and they're likewise getting grip. 

II isn't very comfortable, but then it's scholarship. 

Thev niii.-l sta] I he whole per I'- 1 n i ia nee. though the fog begins 
to drip, 

And they're catching influenza in the theatre. 

"Why are the\ Bitting in a lump?'' Bill Hoi-Polloi remarked. 
"For keeping warm — they can't get warm." the man beside 

him harked. 
"Is that the way the Orecians did?" Bill Hoi-Polloi remarked. 
"You'll have to ask tin architect," the man beside him barked. 
"Oh. they lniill ihe Greek Theayter, and they've got to use it 

now. 
They didn't build the climate, hut they'll use it anyhow. 
It's cultured and its classical, although you must allow 
For a case of influenza in the theater." 

"Is culture always served ■■: ine?' Bill lloi-l'olloi remarked. 
"The college kind, the i olie;. i, ; d." the man beside him barked. 
"Will all the people come again: ' Bill lloi-l'olloi remarked. 
"Some neve: 1 will. Borne ne\ ■>• will," the man beside him harked. 
"For they've got at least pneumonia, you can hear the noses blow. 
Bui it's classical pneumonia, so it's proper, don'I mil know. 
No matter what the weather, why, vou simply have to go 
And t rv some influenza in In" I hea; 1 1 ." 



X 




CHAS.KEJLUS& CO 

EXCLUSIVE 

HIGH GRADE CLOTH I ERS 



% 



No Branch Stores. No Agent*. 
SECOND MONTH 

and 
CONTINUED SUCCESS 

of the 
FIRST SALE WE EVER HELD 

Our battery of real bargains have silenced all sham sales. 

i20.no and SiO.OO 

buys any suit or overcoat in our house, 

Paragon trousers *5 & S6 for choice. Every garment must be sold. 



KING SOLOMON'S HALL 

Fillmore Street, near Sutter, San Francisco 



Jum 1 1. 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 




'Mw&Cntrt 0> He dcnl trt flttif 
'<W tktlnl/j± r lie liri/ji-.mf/mt 



IF- 



11' you were Rudolph Spreckels, 

And 1 were . I nines D. P. 

We'd Btarl some revolution, 

Or fiery prosecution. 

And give our "hard-earned" shekels 

To civic purity — 
If you were Rudolph Spreckels 

And I were James D. P. 

If I were Francis Heney 

And you were one A. Ruef, 
I'd grant you full immunity 
At earliest opportunity, 
Then throw you down completely, 

And lie despite the proof — 
If I were Francis TIeney 

And you were one A. Rue I'. 

If you were Chester Rowell, 

And 1 wen' George Pardee, 
We'd start a Lincoln-Roosevelt League, 
A masterpiece of high intrigue. 
To foist your gubernatorial, 

My senatorial bee — 
If you were Chester Rowell 

And I were George Pardee. 

If you were Fremont Older, 

And I were one A. Mutt, 
I'd write a letter every night 
To threaten you with dynamite, 
Or buy a ( 'oil's revolver 

And crack you with the hult — 
If you were Fremont Older, 

And I were one A. Mutt. 

An Oakland judge granted naturalization papers to an 

illiterate peasant from the Western islands, who confessed thai he 
didn't know whether the word "polygamy" in the statutes was 
an Americanism for hard labor or the name of the President 

of the I ' iiit.nl Slates. II would be unjust to Maine thai Oakland 
judge. Custom almost invariably imposes obligation. It is the 
custom in America to give the elective franchise to every brachy- 
eephalic ignoramus thai comes overseas to ask tor it. An 
pid, foreign lout, admitting his stupidity in broken English or 
through an interpreter whose English is half broken, can "off- 
set the vote" of the wisest and besl citizen of the republic, and 
two of them can completely nullify the intelligent, if Bometimes 
prejudiced ballots of Presideni Wheeler ami Dr. Jordan, [f 

chimpanzees were offered in son i ' courts for "nam 

tion" there would be no objection: and on man 
of the matter. I am inclined to the opinion thai a fairly well- 
trained halioon or a self-respecting chimpanzee would make a 

better citizen then the majority of the foreigners thai 
milled. It's a bad habit, and we must reform the laws before we 
jump the judges. 

Once more 1 ask. Whit has happened to William J. 

Langdon? Into what hole has he crawled, and where is the holer 
Even the Call and Bulletin have ceased to mention him. and the 

Examiner apparently imagines thai they have written his final 
obituary. The office of Dial \ irn San Pram - 

ists. of course; but its functions are exercised by an usurper- 
one Heney, by name, hired by o Spreckelses to 

a private Spreckels revengi ne of those who lur. 

sinned to say that a Spreckels is not a god, or. admitting tl 
ship of the idol, insist thai its I. 9 I am fain to 

believe that there is no Langdon. In due coarse of time « 
speak o( "the Langdon myth." In that day, Langdon will be 
immortal. 



The Labor Council lias, aftet profound meditation ami 

sleepless nights devoted to earnesl debate upon the question, 
finally decided thai the Supervisors are justified in their conten- 
tion with (be United Railroads concerning the lower Marked 
street track. Fortunately for the peace of the community, ibis 
decision is hardbj worth the fetid breath with which it is uttered. 

If the Labor Council bad voted to sustain the railroad corpora- 
lion, ii would have been similarly of no consequence whatever, 
The Labor Council is practically a dead one as far as the affairs 

of this city are involved. Its edicts, ukases, proclamations, pro- 
nuneiaiiienfos and opinions are no longer terror-inspiring; they 
are not even regarded seriously among the helotry of toil; when 

the Labor Council of San Francisco opes its mouth all the dogs 
in town bark at it. This erstwhile despotic dictator in "the 
holy cause of labor" is now in the absurd and contemptible cate- 
gory of the three tailors of Tooley street, of whom probably flic 
illiterates of the Labor Council have never heard, but who have 
for many years been the example most frequently cited to point. 
the ridiculous moral of all impotent presumption of those who 
assume to represent the "sovereign people." 

American ''literature'' is reported to be in a bad way, 

financially. It has been in a bad way from a literary point of view 
for many years, but latterly, it is said, the publishers have been 
reduced to the necessity of printing nearly rejected manuscript 
to avoid printing stuff that "commands a normal price" on the 
bargain counters of authorship. Personally I know nothing of 
the stringency in the marts of ''literature," but from a cursory 
examination of the American output for July, 1 find no appre- 
ciable falling off in the quality of its rottenness. It is the same 
old decayed stock that has linen offered to the "reading public" 
during (he past fifteen or twenty years by the magazines and tin' 
publishing houses; it's the same old fish on the same old stalls. 
shining by its own radiance, like a long-dead mackerel in a dark 
cellar. It is possible that the "literary" toniniyrotterv now pub- 
lishing is a little more tommy rnileii than that which used to be 
vomited from the press, but if it is, the difference is similar to 
that which exists between the odor of the mackerel aforesaid and 
another mackerel. 

What's the matter with "dim" Rea? lias Spreckels 

"granted immunity" to the San Jose boss, too? Of course, bis 
personal quarrel with the Southern Pacific railroad corporation 

in nowise inspires Mr. Ilea's diatribe against those who liave 

foi yeai creatures of Rea's political machine. The bosi 

confesses to much personal iniquity, but even this mass of turpi- 
tude is vastly overshadowed by the crime of his ingratitude. 
"Jim" Rea has rushed into print where heretofore he has feared 
to tread. T iaper is the last refuge of a scoundrel, and 

"Jim" is a ret i i 



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in every article of attire. 

We cordially invite you to visit our establish- 
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pri:es, with those of the general stores. 

VAN NESS AVE. at- BUSH ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETT.]']]; 



July 11, 1908. 




S»P*W*» ■"■!•".- 




LOOKER ON 



In a church out in the Western Addition a so-termed evangel- 
ist named Yeuell (pronounced Ye- Who- Yell) is occupied in the 
noble work of saving souls. Far he it from me to indite a word 
in disparagement of the good work ; there are any number of 
souls I can recall at this moment that need saving. It is simply 
the Yeuell method that I take exception to, for to my notion, 
the tricks and devices used by clothiers and saloon keepers to 
drum up business are decidedly out of place in a house of wor- 
ship. We have all noted frequently some of the innovations of 
a certain class of minister, innovations calculated to swell the 
congregational strength. Organists and choir-singers have been 
engaged with a ministerial business eye fixed on their talents 
alone, and shut to their absence of piety and allegiance to the 
faith. Enormous electric sign?, patterned after those in front of 
drink parlors and lurid printed dodgers have been often used for 
advertising the attractiveness of the church programme. All 
these things are done for a single purpose, the increase numeri- 
cally in the matter of church members. 

Now along comes Mr. Yeuell. the evangelist, with fresh busi- 
ness ideas as a further aid in the congregation boosting. By 
the power of a ponderous voice and a soapy manner he is bring- 
ing people into the church in which he oratorically holds forth 
every evening. This is all very good, as 1 said before, but the 
point of it is. {hat Yeuell is working for the good of the cause on 
a commission basis. He is paid so much per head on those he 
brings into the flock. When his resources are at an end here, 
he will go to the next town on the circuit, containing a church 
of the denomination for which lie works, ami gain fresh converts 
in the same practical way. 

I may be mistaken, but it seems to me that God hardly cares 

. to have folk brought to Him chiefly through the histrionic power 

of an individual, and where the means employed in so doing are 

those of the commercial traveler. It is the way to drum up cus- 

■ torn for refrigerators and a Fedora hat, but the business methods 

of the mart are certainlv out of place in the House of the Lord. 

* » * 

A new colony of writers for the magazines ami newspapers is 
rapidly developing in Mendocino County, between Sherwood anil 
Lavtonville, not far from the route of the new trunk line to 
Eureka which the Northwestern Pacific Railroad is building from 
Willits, its present terminus. Helen Dare, .1. W. Scott, .lack 
Boyle, Arthur Dutton, 0. M. Boyle, as well as several associate 
members of the Press Club, have taken up land there, much of it 
contiguous, until there is quite a journalistic atmosphere in that 
picturesque locality. 

* * » 

As the News Letter predicted some time ago. the Federal au- 
thorities are prosecuting with increasing vigor the men who have 
fraudulently acquired tracts of Government land. Three arrests 
made recently in Oregon on perjury charges are only a small step 
in the bringing to justice of the offenders who have deprived 
honest, bona fide settlers of locations for homes. If the Gov- 
ernment continues to stir up the frauds in land entries as it is 
doing now, there will be a scampering of the land thieves and 
a re-opening of thousands of acres of valuable territory to the 
genuine home-seeker. 

* * » 

In connection with the solar eclipse which took place June 
28th, I was both surprised ami embarrassed to hear two other- 
wise well-informed and intelligent people refer to it as an "an- 
nual eclipse," and a third, while correctly terming it an ''annu- 
lar eclipse," nevertheless indicating a belief that it was annual. 
Are our standards of education and of general information fall- 
ing with the rise of our utilitarianism ? 

* * * 

With the near approach of the hunting season, we are already 
hearing of the people who get lost in the woods and suffer great 
privations. These people are unfortunates and are to be pitied, 
but there is another product of the hunting season of whom we 
also hear regularly, namely, the man who shoots another man. 
thinking the latter to be a deer. This individual is fail same 



RED C& WHITE 

BURGUNDIES 



FROM 



C. cTVlarejr C& Liger-Belair 

Nuits, France 

Charles Meinecke & Co. 



Agents Pacific Coast 



San Francisco 



for the fool-killer. Any person claiming to be a hunter who 
shoots recklessly at a moving object, without being sure of what 
he i- shooting at, should bo deprived of his license, his gun ami 
his persona] liberty as well, until he proves his right In !»■ at 
large. 

* * • 

Strength is added to the demand of Western citizens ami com- 
mercial bodies of Pacific Coast Slates fir a flotilla of submarine 
torpedo boats by the fact that the only two submarines on this 
coast, (he Grampus and the Pike, built in San Francisco ami now 
at Mare Island, are Boon to be sent to Manila. The collier Caesar 
— which has just taken the Porpoise and the Shark to Manila 
from New York — will come here in a few weeks for the Cram- 
pus and the Pike. We certainly nee, I submarines tor the [oca! 
coast defense. The Atlantic coast now has seven, with eight 
more building. 

* * * 

For the first time in the history of the United States. Utah 
is to have a namesake in the navy. Secretary Metcalf has an- 
nounced that one of the big 20,000 ton battleships authorized 
by Congress at its last session is to be named the Utah. The 
other will be called the Florida, 'lie monitor now bearing thai 
name to have a city of that Slate substituted. Tin 1 monitors 
Wyoming, Arkansas and Nevada are also to be re-named after 
cities in their respective Slates, leaving the Stale names for 
new battleships. The long neglect of Utah will be partly com- 
pensated for by the great size ami power of the vessel that will 
at last bear her name. 

* * * 

It is difficult to surpass the Orientals in graceful amenities. 
First, the Japanese erect a monument at Port Arthur to their 
gallant Russian foes who defended that place, and now conies 
the announcement that China will return to the United Stales 
the remitted indemnity money by expending it in the education 
in this country to some 200 Chinese youths. It may be added 
that Japan has given new Japanese names to all the warships 
captured from Russia in the late war. These acts of courtesy 
go far toward cultivating a universal brotherhood of man, re- 
gardless of race — if there really In' more than one human race. 




The wonderful new talking 
machine without a horn 

The top closes over the record, shutting out all the 
noise of operation — the pure music of the record comes 
from a mahogany sound reflector. Elegantly made of 
solid mahogany, combined with record cabinet for 150 
records. The finest talking machine made. Send for 
booklet. 

Price $200 



Sherman Kay & Go. 

Stelnway Piaaos— Victor Talking Machines 
KEARNY AND SUTTER, S. F. 

B.oadwavat 13th 1635 Van New Av< 

Oakland San Franci»co 



July 11, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



Prom the mortality reports that come regularly from Hi 
army in the Philippines, ii would seem thai deaths from diseasi 
are far outnumbered by deaths from violence, even though peai 

prevails in Hie islands. Of Hie si\ deaths inentio I in (general 

Weston's last report, two were from drowning, two from suicide, 
one from a street ear accident, and only one from disease- 
pneumonia. The Philippines appear to be freer from disease 
than most parts of our own land. 

* * * 

I cannot refrain from annexing the latest disclosures of the 
irrepressible Veritas, who takes occasion to attack "historical 
truth." He remarks that the recent flutter regarding General 
Grant's drinking habits suggests the thought that if historians, 
instead of glossing over well-known facts, set them forth with 
brutal frankness, the narrative would make mighty interesting 
reading. It may be chivalrous not to speak ill of the dead, but 
if a writer claims to tell the truth, why shouldn't he do so ? 

For instance, General Wolfe was shot by one of his own men 
in front of Quebec, similar incidents being quite common in all 
wars. Washington was not immaculate in his morals (see his 
letter, to Lafayette preserved in the national capital) ; although 
Aaron Burr never made the Presidency, one of his promiscuous 
sons succeeded in doing so; the words "Don't give up the ship" 
were never uttered by the dying Lawrence, but were the inven- 
tion of a Boston editor, who said the naval hero ought to have 
spoken them ; the revolutionary uprising in Texas was secretly 
encouraged by President Jackson; the last words of John 
Quincy Adams when stricken to the floor of the House were : 
"Quick, a little brandy;" the telegram announcing that a certain 
commander of the army of the Potomac had been stunned during 
the battle by the concussion of a cannon ball against a column 
against which he was leaning, should have stated that the said 
cannon ball was a demijohn of whisky, at Cold Harbor, General 
Grant's outburst of profanity made Washington's achievement in 
thai line at Monmouth look like an infant's prayer; the recent 
Panama uprising was cleverly planned by the Government, and 
the Maine was destroyed by an interior explosion. 

But why attempt further to demonstrate the self-evident truth 
that all men, no matter how exalted their station, are human be- 
ings like ourselves, and we love them mine Hie less therefor? 

* * » 

The Spreckels family is satisfied dial there has really been a 
marriage, mid thai Adolph uncle Adolph, has trooly-roolj mar 
ried Alma de Bretteville. There are few families in the United 

States who. as a matter of fact, may 'in. i-i alliance with bluer 

blood, and Hie unwise friends who busied themselves deriving the 

fact that uncle Adolph was married are novi hedging and preen- 
ing, for it has been given out thai Adolph ami In- bride will visit 
with the Danish royalties. It seem that lie Bretteville, p 
Hie brother of Hie Baroness Rosencrantss, and thai she and her 

husband, Eormerlj i mbassador, are greal favorites at Hie Dan- 

ish court. The honeymooning couple will n ayfornearly 

a year, and most of the time will be spent in Denmark and Ger- 
many. The De Bretteville family lias mam German and Danish 
connections, although the Canul] itsel if " : ' Freni h 
The I >e Brettevilles were "emigres" when th of the 

families of the many friends, who held tip their hands in holy 
horror at the mesalliance, were working in the fields or as street 
laborers in \<» York. Adolph has always been the most human 
of all the Sprei kels lot, and ii ; * more than probable thai he has 
made 8 n that will ensure a happv and lasting union. 

* * » 

Mosl every one know- of or has seen Stephen Costello, the 
San Francisco attorney. 1 rho do uol take then 

Beriously, ' i beautiful fund of amusement, for he is 

always doing something to provoke audible grins. From officiat- 

shal in pat 
intelligent members of the infant classes in Sunday schools, < -■ 
telle lias run the gamut of notable human achievements. 
Ii is said that last Sunday Costello was scheduled to _ 
a Sunday school out in the M - 

k-full of gems of Hi. night. ai 
Cost, .IK. vocabulary is - 

preparing his before delivering them. As 

extemporaneous orator, Costello h 

that he has few equals. Well, the modern une 

the platform and ga l dy at his ai 

"Alt. leetle chee-ildren," he is reported to have begun. 



Pears' 

The ingredients 
in many soaps, re- 
quire free alkali to 
saponify them. 

The rich, cool 
lather of Pears' does 
not result from free 
alkali, fats or rosin. 

Pears' and purity 
are synonymous. 

Matchless for the complexion. 



accompaniment of a first-rate exhibition of Delsarte, "I am glad 
to greet you this gladsome morning. I-ah, I-ah, I trust that all 
of the leetle chee-ildren are properly cognizant of the fact that 
you are to be-ah addressed by-ah, by a gentleman who can feel 
and appreciate-ah all the thoughts, the emotions, the feelings 
of — ah — of, of, of-ah happy childhood. I am as one of you my- 
self. I am as one of you-ah leetle chee-ildren, even though I 
appear to be full grown. Of course, 1 speak and give utterance 
to my thoughts in far more eloquent, way than you can possibly 
do, but-ah I am with you in spirit just the same. This afternoon 
as an instance of my great-ah ability and power-ah I shall ad- 
dress you on any subject that you-ah may desire, wish, and-ah 
stipulate. Now-ah, what shall I talk about?" 

Aw, talk about two minutes!" came from a small urchin in 
the rear of the hall who had heard Mr. Costello orate on one 
ai before. 



DR. ADOLPH ROSENTHAL 

Oculist and aurist. Removed to Hastings Building. 162 Post 
street, corner Grant avenue. Hours: 1 to 4. Tel. Douglas 2424. 



Carnegie Brick and Pottery Co. 

M. A. MURPHY, General Manager. 

Vitrified Brick, Paving Brick, Fire Brick. Fire Tile, Fire Clay, 

Duat, Drain Tile, Acid Jara, Acid Plpea, Acid Brick*. 

Architectural Terra Cotta, Hollow Tile Flre-Proofllng. Semi-Dry 
Pressed Brick. Terra Cotta Chimney Pipe. Brick and Tile Mantels. 
Flue Linings. I'rns and Vases. Flower Pots All kinds of Vitrified 
Salt-Glazed Sewer Pipe. 

Factory: Tesla. Alameda County. Cai. Tarda: San Francisco. 
Oakland. Berkeley. San Jose. 

Office — 10th and Olvlalon St«.. San Francltco. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 11, 1908. 




IpmnraltEFB Wamm 




An incident which is almost as illuminating as the side-lighta 
on society thrown in Bernstein's "The Thief," was told in the 
News Letter not long ago. A society woman, whose taste in 
dress was more extravagant than her allowance, had endeavored 
to retrieve herself by allowing her milliner to place bets on the 
races, and then pad the hills for hats sent to the husband to 
make good the losses on the track. As a companion piece to 
this disagreeable picture, I have just been given a peep at an 
exhibition which might be entitled "Playing Solitaire for Place! 
by Old Masters." Don't imagine that the solitaire was the good 
old-fashioned game by which patient card players beguile them- 
selves. It was a fine solitaire diamond, the engagement ring of 
a young couple whose wedded bliss is said to have taken wings. 
I am creditably informed that if the young wife carries out her 
intention of bringing suit for divorce, one of tin- charges will be 
that her husband even pawned her engagement ring to secure 
money to play the races. The husband is said to have been a 
constant habitue of the track all season, and his losses would 
have wrecked even a wealthier man. The young wife, after her 
capacity for forgiveness had been strained beyond endurance, 
took up her residence with her parents, who have al last given 
up trying to show the husband the error of his way — which 
leads straight to Emeryville every season. The father-in-law. 
who is wealthy, has informed trades-people and hotelmen that 
they need not count, on him to 0. K. the young man's bills, and 
the romance of this young couple will show the cloven hoof 
marks of the track when it is brought into court. 



UNCLE SAM WILL TAKE PART. 

Now that the United States Government has made a $<;no,- 
000 appropriation for participation in the Alaska- Yukon-Pacific 
exposition, the work of creating the 1909 Fair has been given 
an impetus. While there has never been any doubt in the minds 
of the management as to the success of the exposition, and as to 
its being ready on time, the Government's action has stimulated 
more interest in the fair throughout the country. 

During the past week, applications for concessions and exhibit 
space have been pouring into the offices in the Administrat on 
building. The construction work has gone ahead withoul any 
cessation, and there are nine buildings finished or under con- 
struction. 

The Government architects are working on the plans for 
[Jncle Sam's buildings, and just as soon as the designs are fin- 
ished construction will be started. Of the total appropriation, 
$250,000 will be spent in the buildings. Besides the main Gov- 
ernment building, there will be structures for Hawaii, Alaska, 
the Philippines and the fisheries industry, The remaining 
•$:i50,000 will be expended for exhibits as follows: Government 
$300,000; Alaska, $100,000; Hawaii, $2S,000: Philippines 
$85,000. 



FOR SALE. 
A bargain: Automatic addressing machine, cosl $350; Rem- 
ington No. 6, $115; 5,000 stencils, $7.50; Sundries, $50. Total 
$523.50. Will be sold cheap. H interested, see Mr. Power room 
16, 773 Market street. 



Swain's new location in Van Ness avenue, at 1241-1345 

has a feature that appeals lo the ladies in it? Ladies' Tea Room! 
There is music from three to live o'clock everj afternoon. 
Swain's, the Original Swain's Bakery and Restaurant, is as (veil 
known to San Franciscans as their family names. It is oper, 
ated by the F. A. Swain Company. It is the ideal luncheon 
place for gentlemen. 



MADE TO YOUR ORDER 

THREAD & THRUM RUGS 

HARMONY of Rug and Room is secured by this 
sturdy, inexpensive handmade product of ex- 
pert craftsmen in the THREAD & THRUM WORK- 
SHOP. All wool or camel's hair weft. Your color 
schemes perfectly matched. 
Rugs, all sizes, woven in colors 
desired on short notice on re- 
ceipt of order. Last a lifetime. 
Four pounds to square yard, 
yet pliable and artistic. Spec- 
ially appropriate for country houses, cottages, dens, 
porches, offices, rooms furnished in mission style. 

THREAD & THRUM WORKSHOP, Auburn, N. Y. 

TAYLOR & SINCLAIR, Selling Agents, 1464 Bush St. 

"You Do the Designing— We'll Make the Rug" 



Thread & Thrum 
Workshop 



TRADEMARK 
REGISTERED 



HEADQUARTERS for 

Refrigerators 



The largest stock and greatest variety on the 
Pacific Coast. 



65 



different styles and 
sizes to select from 



The ALASKA 

will keep provisions longer and USE LESS ICE 
than any other Refrigerator in the market. 

W. W. Montague & Co. 

Cor. Turk and Polk Sts. 



Hello Douglas 1854. 

We keep the finest grade of Men's Furnishings including 
silk and linen mesh underwear, the leading lines of shirts, 
collars, neckwear, gloves, in fact everything for the up- 
to-date man. 

248 POWELL STREET 

NEAR HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

SAN FRANCISCO 



The high art Japanese exhibit in the Marsh's new Japanr 

ese rooms at Hotel Fairmont, is well worth a visit. 



MONEY BACK 

GLASSES 

It my glasses fail to suit I'll 
refund your money. 




15S8 Fillmore Street, It Geary 



July 11, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



PLEASURED 
mND 




— Goto tDoeuv 

By Barnett Franklin. 



"The Oreai Divide" mid Henri/ Miller al the Van Ness. 

William \'«t ii.tclm Moody's "The Great Divide," long-heralded 
as the Greal American Drama, has nunc to town under the chap- 
eronage of oui old friend, Henry Miller. Filled with the recol- 
lection id' that wonderful stock season directed by Miller at the 

nlil Columbia Theatre several years ago — the most perfect series 
of productions that San Francisco playgoers have known — the 
veteran first-nighters went to the Van Ness last Monday serene 
in the anticipation of finding a cast up to the Miller standard, 
and a production that would not pale the Miller memories of the 
past. We were not disappointed on either id' these scores. The 
histrionic interpreters of "The Great Divide" go to make up as 
evenly excellent a company as it is our privilege to see, and, for 
the rest, Mr. Miller has contrived for us. scenically and other- 
wise, an eye-fesl that inspires the three-ply adjectives of adula- 
tion. There is not the figment of a flaw to be discerned; the 
Miller managerial hand has been certainly developing in skill 
and cleverness. 

That "The Great Divide," however, is the Great American 
Drama, which it has been fnlsomely acclaimed to be, is another 
matter. From this widely-current judgment I must humbly 
beg to dissent. It is decidedly a remarkable piece of dramaturgy, 
as regards boldness of theme: it has bigness and power ami 





Henry Milter, as Stephen Ghent, in 

\'ii n Ness Theatre. 



Tin- Gn nl Divide" »/ ///< 



sweep. I can't accept, though, Mr. M 1\'- premises as being 

logical in their entirety, for ingeniously dressed in poesy as thev 
are. there i- often still that something that delivers the jolt to 

one's sense of credulity. Vet there is a line atrengtb in the 
il rv of In- message, poetically idealized and over-emphasized 

though it be. In striking contrast with this idealization arc the 

asional lapses of the play into unvarnished theatrieism. The 

lirsl act is undeniably melodramatic, and the \Ve-l thai is dc- 



®&* lal&iuin $ |ano 

The beauty of the Baldwin tone has endeared 
it to pianists and singers supreme in the do- 
main of music and to amateurs of culture. 

ppEcceprn and I SEP RV 



POGNO, 

de PACHMANN, 

SEMBRICH. 



GRAND PRIX, PARIS. 19O0. 

GRAND PRIZE. ST LOUIS, 1904. 



Sold bv the Makers 



(ti Barry, the famous En 
will appear next week at the Orpheum. 



who 



(I hr faltoin (f oinpan? 

INCORPORATED 
1569 VAN NESS AVE., COR. CALIFORNIA 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 11, 1908. 



lineated has in it a good deal of the West of the footlights. There 
are touches now and again that call to mind the stage-craft of 
the builder of "The Girl of the Golden West," and it really seems 
in many instances that Moody even out-Belascoes Belasco. 

Certain uses of time-honored stand-bys of the melodrammer 
loom annoyingly, and in vivid contrast with the simple, natu- 
ral beauty that 'belongs to the bringing out of the play's central 
theme. The coincidental meeting of the characters in the Rock- 
ies, for instance, smacks so insistently of the lower dramatic 
forms that it is hard to accept it in good faith. The old use of 
the dice-box to determine the fate of a woman, and the stagey 
methods of introducing comedy, but serve to scatter disillusion. 

Yet, "The Great Divide" offers a big earnestness to offset 
the rest. It is big in its problem: the battle of the primitive and 
the developed, typified respectively by wonderfully varied types 
that represent the West and the East. Stephen Ghent is the rep- 
resentative of the ATest, and as we find him at first, a bestial, 
whisky-soaked brute who seeks the possession of Ruth, the woman 
of the East. How he takes her away with him, Sabine fashion, 
to the Roof of the World beyond "The Great Divide," and 
how through the influence of the woman, regeneration comes to 
the man, is what the play exploits. There is no question that 
this drama, apart from its structural weaknesses, will, through 
the power of its purpose and its great vitality, make for a strong 
influence upon the national drama. Each intelligent mirroring- 
of our life — the American life — is another step in, the right 
direction, toward the goal that is labeled: "The Great American 
Drama." 

Mr. Moody's characters are all drawn with a sure hand, and 
they are essentially human. Miller himself is Ghent, the rugged 
man of the West, and plays him artistically and repressively in 
the accredited Miller fashion. Ruth Jordan, the Puritan girl, is 
played by Edith Olive, an actress new to us, but who impresses 
as being extremely capable. Laura Hope Crews, well-known 
locally, shows that she has improved wonderfully in her absence 
beyond the Great Divide, and invests the ingenue role of Polly 
Jordan with quite a delicious quality. Charles Wyngate con- 
tributes a capable bit as Philip Jordan. And then there is Mrs. 
Whiffen — dear old Mrs. Whiffen — who is back again in one of 
her rare, motherly parts played as only she can play them. 

These principals, and for that matter, the minor roles, are all 
handled most skillfully. There is no criticism to offer of the 
cast or the presentation, which is extraordinarily vivid. The sec- 
ond act scene, which discloses a view from the brink of a can- 
yon in the Cordillera Mountains, is wonderfully executed. Noth- 
ing so fine in stage settings has ever been presented on a San 
Francisco stage. 

* * * 

The Orpheum. 

Jesse Lasky atones for his "Seven Hoboes," whom he recently 
sent us, by the act that we get this week at the Orpheum. "A 
Night on a Houseboat" is a musical comedy in tablet form, and 
quite good musical comedy it is, even though undistinguished 
by wonderful warbling. A company of nine contribute to the 
sprightliness of the piece, which is well mounted and decidedly 
pleasing visually. 

Bertie Herron, the "Minstrel Miss," has vivacity and grace, 
but no particular voice power. The Patty Frank Troupe are 
acrobats, with the inevitable small boy accessory, who do con- 
ventional tumbling in the conventional manner. "A Woman's 
Way" is the title of a near-pathetic sketch in which Mr. and 
Mrs. George A. Beane and Master Beane appear. It deals for 
the most part with a not particularly palatable exhibition of 
D. T.'s on the part of Beane Sr., and his reformation while you 
wait through the influence of Beane, Jr. 

Of the holdovers. Marcel's studies with the human form are 
as entertaining as ever. The clever manipulator of cards, Leip- 
zig, is as good as any in his line we have had in many months. 
Fred Bond and Company continue to entertain with their ab- 
breviated farce. 



old way. Why is it that the theatres of the better class, those 
that go in -for the exploitation of the higher drama, are almost 
universally possessed of an advertising curtain in all its hideous- 
ness? The theatre, gauged from all other viewpoints, may be 
appointed in excellent taste; there is generally in these days a 
disposition to give the playgoer his money's worth as regards the 
upholstery of his seat, and in other ways. This, apart from 
the merits or demerits of the attraction itself! But the seat- 
purchaser who essentially goes to the playhouse to get away from 
mundane things is forced to regale himself between acts feast- 
ing his optics upon a weird melange of worse than inartistically 
painted announcements masquerading as a mural decoration. 

The actors on the stage are there for the purpose of creating 
an illusion. The individual holding down a seat in the parquet 
is thrilled, awed, impressed or entertained as the playwright 
has willed, and as the mummers have interpreted. The curtain 
drops upon a situation tense or intense. Some of the spectators 
start immediately on a still hunt for cloves, but the great major- 
ity remains and puts in the time to the beginning of the next 
act in contemplation or argument on what has gone before. Un- 
less one turns his back to the footlights, which is well-nigh a 
physical impossibility, there is no getting away from the adver- 
tising curtain. It is persistently, insistently present, officiating 
as a s'catterer of disillusion. The atmosphere of the drawing- 
room or mountain cabin or what not, simulated but a moment 
before, has given way to a broad expanse of canvas, an exquisite 
example of the sign-painter's noble art, which informs the au- 
dience that "Dress suits can be hired for $2.50," or that Some- 
body's fizz water "will take away that dark sienna taste in the 
morning after a hat with the boys," or that "Goo-goo's corsets 
will give portly people that sinewy figure." The poor, helpless 
spectator cannot escape his fate: he is both theoretically and 
literally up against it. And the illusion which the combined 
arts of playwright, actor and stage manager have endeavored to 
create has been given a blow in the solar plexus. It seems to mo 
that it would be quite as consistent to placard the portieres lead- 
ing to a drawing room not in stageland with paid eulogies on 
steam bear and union underwear, as it is to so decorate the 
drop curtain that similarly screens the drawing-room behind 
the footlights. 

We have the reputation of being a commercially progressive 
nation, but sometimes our progress is saturated with a form of 
hysteria. If the advertising curtain were not such a serious 
theatrical factor it might be catalogued with the jokes of the 
comic papers, but its influence is of a nature that precludes that. 
Undignified, snidely commercial, the advertising curtain must 
soon make its farewell exit. Its abolishment would be the big- 
gest sort of a gain for art, and the public, or at least that por- 
tion of the public that planks down its shekels at the box-office, 
and is of right entitled to witness an exhibition of histrionics 
in an environment that does not suggest the bill-board around 
an empty lot. 



A Little Sermon on Advertising Curtains. 

When will the doom of the advertising curtain be pronounced? 
Ever and again we hear of some feeble attempt at relegating this 
eye-sore to the oblivion where it rightfully belongs, but at the 
moment of writing it is still on deck and strenuously attempt- 
ing to boost the sale of peerless soaps and soups in the same lurid 





10% 


10fo 


10% 




10f 


Taft $ Pennoyer's 

Semi-Annual 
Discount Sale 

< mi mm e mint! Wednesday, July 8 

A general discount of ten per cent will be given on all 

goods purchased during July. 
This discount does not apply on the many lines of 

goods already specially reduced more than 10 

per cent. 
The few exceptions are goods sold "net" under con- 
tract with the manufacturer, muslins, sheetings, etc. 

14th .i BROADWAY 

After October 1 in our new store at Clay, 14th to 15th 


ioi 


lOfo 


ioi 


lOfo 


M 




io% | \oi 


10% 





July 11, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



A DVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

The delightful musical extravaganza, "It Happened in Norrl- 
lanrl," is doing a big business at the Princess Theatre, and it is 
unquestionably the best light musical entertainment that has 
been given at this house. Principals, orchestra and chorus seem 
In vie with each other in their efforts to excel, and the perform- 
ance from first to Inst is closely punctured with heartv applause 
and laughter. Julius Steger. William Burress, May Bolcy, Ar- 
thur Cunningham, Frank Parrington, Sarah Edwards, John 
Romano, Virginia Poltz, Zoo Burnett. Christina Nielsen, Robert 
Z. Leonard, Charles E. Couture and George B. Pield constitute 
an admirable cast. The dashing girl chorus and the excellent 
orchestra which Selli Simonsen so ably conducts, contribute to 
the success of the entertainment. It has been decided to continue 
"It Happened in Nordland" for one more week. 

The bill at the Orpheum for next week will be headed by Wil- 
liam IT. Thompson, the distinguished American actor, who will 
make bis first appearance at this theatre, and present a one-act 
play by Clay M. Greene, entitled "For Love's Sweet Sake." Mr. 
Thompson needs no introduction to local play goers, for his im- 
personation of the Cardinal in "The Royal Family" is well re- 
membered. Katie Barry, who, since her debut in New York, 
lias been identified with numerous Broadway musical comedies, 
will make her first appearance in this city. She was specially 
engaged by the Schuberts to play the part of Fifi in the original 
Casino production of "A Chinese Honeymoon." Miss Barry will 
sing several of her most popular character songs. The La Vine 
Cimaron Trio will present an act by Frank Gardner, entitled 
"Imagination," in which the grotesque comedy and clever dan- 
cing for which the trio is noted, and a travesty on physical cul- 
ture are introduced. Fred Singer will introduce himself in an 
ambitious musical novelty called "The Violin Maker of Cre- 
mona." Tom Barry and Madge Hughes will introduce a novel 
ail called "A Story of the Street." in which Mr. Barry play3 a 
lough young man with an abnormally swelled head because he 
has made an unexpected hit. in cheap melodrama. This is all told 
in an exceedingly clever style, and with the aid of some bewil- 
dering slang. Next week will be the last of "A Night on a Boat 
House," the Patty Frank Troupe, and of Jean Marcel's art 
studies. A new series of motion pictures will conclude the bill. 

* * * 

"His Grace de Grammont." in which White Whittlesey starts 
his, season at the Alcazar next week, was written by Clyde Fite'i, 
and is said to be one of the best plays of its kind. Tt treats of 
the adventures of De Grammont, a French political exile, at the 
licentious court of Charles IT of England, where his graces of 
manner and person made him beloved of women, while men were 
iealous of his popularity and feared his swordsmanship. Thus 
il is not wonderful that love-making, fighting and dancing arc 
plentiful in the play. 

Tn the cast will be all the Alcazar favorites, including Howard 
Hickman as the King, Will Walling as Lord Jermyn, Adele Bel- 
garde as Lady Caatlemaine. ami Ernes! Glendinrjing, Burt Wes- 
ner, John B. Maher, Louise Brownell, Effie Bond and Anita 
Murray in suitable roles. Many extra people are employed to 
complete the stage pictures, which promise to excel in wealth of 

furniture and costumery Hie Alcazar's best previous effort in 
thai direction. 

* * * 

FTenrj Miller's lavish production nf William Vauirhn Moody's 
drama of American life, "The Great Divide." will be continued 
for one more week at the Van Ness Theatre, It will he followed 
by a new comedy by Pei j Mackaye called "Mater," in 

ile of 'he Mother will lated by Isabel Irving. 

"The Great Divide" is reviewed in another column. 



New Alcazar Theatre 



COR. SUTTER AND 
STEINER STS 

BRLASCO * MiTKR. Own.rt an* Buaf«l AWolnUly "OftM k" Bntldiof 

Seventieth week of the Alcaiar Stock Company, commencing Monday evening 
July nth. Mr. White Whittlesey, supported by the Aka/ar players. In Clyde 
Fitch's ureal costume drama. 

HLs GRACE De GRAMMONT 

A splendid scenic production. 

Prices— Rvenlfifi 15c to Jl Matinees, 86c to 50c. Matinee Sun- 
day ami Sail 

Monday. July nth— Mr. Whm^f' la IF I WERE KING, E. H. Souther n's 

great success. 



THE MODERN WA >'. 

I'lie am tsepl ic babi and the phophylactic pup 

Were playing in the garden when the Imiinv uamholleil up: 
They looked upon the creature with a loathing undisguised, 
For be wasn't disinfected, and he wasn't sterilized. 

They said he was a microbe and a hot-bed of disease, 
They steamed him in a vapor of a thousand odd degree-. 
They froze him in a freezer, that was cold as banished hope, 
And washed him with permanganate and carbolated soap. 

With sulphuretted hydrogen they bathed his wiggly ears. 
They trimmed his frisky whiskers with a pair of hard-boiled 

shears, 
They donned their rubber mittens, then they took him by the 

hand, 
And elected him a member of the Fumigated Band. 

Now there's not a micrococcus in the garden where they play. 
They bathe in pure idoform a dozen times a day. 
Each takes his daily rations from a hygienic cup. 
The Baby, and the Bunny, and the Prophylactic Pup. 

— A. Francis Walker in the New York World. 



Art lovers will be accorded a treat by a visit to the studio 

of Arthur W. Best, 1638 Bush street, where a number of notable 
landscapes are now on view. Dreamy vistas of California's 
sunny slopes vie with those of more rugged mountain scenes. A 
very noteworthy canvas shows a storm brewing on the Marin 
County hills; and another of equal interest depicts the Berkeley 
oaks with a glimpse of San Francisco Bay in the distance. Two 
very clever copies of a couple of paintings by Van Ostade, a 
Flemish painter of the 17th century, may also be seen. The 
originals are now in the Louvre; the copies are by Z. Alexander, 
an old San Francisco boy, and are placed on exhibition by Gen- 
eral E. L. Huggins, IT. S. A. There are also clever examples of 
the work of Mr. Best's pupils, which deserve more than passing 
notice. The school remains open during the summer months, 
and the pleasant weather lias induced many to avail themselves 
of the opportunity of joining the out-door sketch class, which 
convenes weekly. 



Orpheum 



ILLIS 9T , RCiR FILLMORE. 



■Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 

ARTISTIC VAUDEVILLE. 
WILLIAM H. THOMPSON & CO. in Cla> M. Greene's one act play. "Fo r 
Love's Sweet Sake;"" Katie Barry; La Vine Cimaron Trio; Fred Singer; Barry 
and Hughes. Last week A Night In A House Boat; Patty Frank Troupe. New 
Orpheum Motion Pictures. Last week Jean Marcel's Art Studies. 
Evening Prices 10, 25, 50, 75c. Box Seats $1.00. Matinee Prices [Except 
Sundays and Holidays] 10. 2^, 50c. Phone WEST 6000. 



Van Ness Theatre 



CORNER VAN NESS AVE. 

AND GROVE STREET 

OOTTLOB. MARX A CO . Propi >nd M«r. Phoo. JUrk.l SO* 

Monday. July ij. second week of -the HENRY MILLER SEASON. Last six 
nights— Matinee Saturday — of 

THE GREAT DIVIDE. 
By Willlair. Vaughn Moody. 
Monday. July 20th — The new comedy. "Mater." 

TUT ATOf Ellis Street near Fillmore. 

PHONE Cl *" " A " Tn ""« 

WEST863 Prices-Evenings a 5 c. 50c. 75c 

Matinees, except Sundays and hol- 
idays. 25c and 50c. 

Matinee Saturday and Sundae This week and next Lew Fields' Musical Ex- 
travaganza success 

IT HAPPENED IN NORDLAND. 
Julius Steger. May Boley. William Burress. and all the Princess favorities in 
the cast. 

NeM-THE BRIDAL TRAP. Including E%elvn Franco- K u S"n^ 

Birds with William Burress as Hammerstem. 




A. W. BEST 



ALICE BEST 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 



1628 BUSH STREET 



unounn 

DAT iHD SIGHT 



ILI.USTIUT.JIG 
SKETCHING 
PA 1ST IMG 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Jdly 11, 1908. 



pttk Jtorta unb iRefc Ifrrotrs 

lg (&. iarkua 



"Considering the United States as a great workshop — 
possibly the future workshop of the world — a summary of its 
size and its tools — its tools being its people and its resources — 
and what it has already accomplished in comparison with the 
world's totals, may be presented id the following round per- 
centages: We have a population of 5 per cent, and an area a 
little under ti per cent of the world's ; we are raising annually 
43 per cent of the world's production of wheat, corn and oats, 
for 1907 we made 42 per cent of the world's iron production, 
37 per cent of the coal, 71 per cent of the cotton, 62 per cent 
of the petroleum, and 57 per cent of the copper production 



upon which the development of electricity is dependent — in 
all, over 50 per cent of the world's chief necessities; we are 
steadily gaining in our proportion of the world's productive 
interests, and it is impossible to state in figures the potentiali- 
ties of this country's future. Europe, realizing our tremen- 
dous advantages, seeing the limitless wealth of the future if 
we are left to continue our development, and knowing that 
such wealth and power would make us the arbiters of the fate 
of the world's trade and commerce, might combine to try to 
crush and control us before we reach that position." — Current 
Trarlr NoU. 



We copied ye bards of success, 

Aping you line by line. 
With throaty phrase we sang the praise 

Of war and the dashing brine; 
Of the frozen North and the wilds, 

Of heroes and cowards we sang — 
A heroic creed for weaklings to read 

To girls with a militant twang. 

For we envied your books and your sales, 

And your big editions desired; 
So we struggled to get the style ye had set, 

And the style that the stores required. 
So we made our heroes profane 

At devil and danger and sect — 
A heroic creed for weaklings to read 

With devil-may-care effect. 

So we wrote of passionate youth, 

Of reckless, magnanimous hearts, 
Of young men's feet and dauntless conceit, 

And the call of the world's wild parts. 
And women — we smirched them a bit, 

With a hero the tale to recite 
Of his careless creed — for weaklings to read 

To girls in parlors at night. 

Shall we write you the songs that we know — 
The songs that our own people build — 

The songs of to-day and the songs of the way 
That the heart of the nation is thrilled ? 



Millbrae Kennels 



MILLBRAE, CALIF- 




x c ' 



--=- 



Twenty minutes from 'Frisco opposite S. P. Station and San Mateo Electric at 
Millbrae: backed by ten square miles of heather fields where the dors arp 
exercised twice daily. s 

Supervised by G. S. Haliwell who continues to breed and sell high class 
Boston Terriers and Bull Dogs. 



If you wish to BOARD, BUY or BREED a good dog call or write 

The Millbrae Kennel Go. 



Office— Room 210, Cochrane and Bull Bldg 
251 Kearny, cor. Bush. Phone Douglas 1937. ' 



Yea, that — or go to the shops — 
Sell ribbons along with the sect 

Of weaklings who read a hypocrite creed 
With devil-may-care effect. 

Till lo ! we had written a book — 

Were we to be bards of success? 
And we read the book before we took 

The things we had written to press. 
Then we laughed and our hearts grew gay. 

As we watched the fire-flare bright 
And red on the creed for weaklings to read 

By girls in parlors at night. 

Shall we write you true songs of the West — 

New songs of a Western world — 
The songs of a race that has won its place 

In the van with its war-flags furled ? 
That has fought, but its strength was peace — 

That has won, but by giving life — 
A heroic creed for a nation to read 

To nations forespent with strife? 

The songs of iron and steel, 

The lyric of militant trade — 
The new romance of high finance 

And merchantman unafraid — 
The songs of the new world's work 

In the tongue of these lrtter days — 
A heroic creed for nations to read 

In the light of their Master's praise? 







PLAN TO VISIT 



YOSEMITE 
VALLEY 



THIS SEASON 

NOW REACHED BY RAIL 

A quick, comfortable trip. An ideal outing amid the grandeurs of Yosemlte 

For through tickets and connections 

See Southern Pacific or Santa Fe Agent 

or Addres. 0. \\. LEHMER, Traffic M.n.der. M.rced, C.I. 



.Iim.v 11, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISKK. 



13 



ANITE, 




The Reverend E. E. Baker, who for a number of years lias 
been the pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Oakland, 
has announced that when lie leaves the pastorate on August 30th 
he leaves the pulpit forever. He says his experience since he has 
ministered to the congregation in Oakland, which has indeed 
been stormy, places him in such a position that never again can 
he occupy the sacred desk. 

Reverend Baker, as a minister of the Gospel, has caused no 
end of comment on the part of church-going people by his in- 
dependent ways. Among other things, he is an enthusiastic 
golfer. It is no uncommon sight on Saturday afternoons to see 
the rotund figure of the clergyman, a cigarette in his month. 
following the elusive golf ball around the links at the Claremont 
Country Club. Because of his unconventional ways, some of the 
staunch old Presbyterian brothers who believe that the minister 
should be the great living example, objected, but the jolly-souled 
pastor, as care free as Friar Tuck, supported by other members 
not of the old Presbyterian school, let the storm rage around him 
until he got ready to sever his connections with the church, then 
announced he would quit, and that his quitting meant now and 
forever. 

The question which is now going the rounds is : What will Dr. 
Baker do? Will he enter law or real estate? For, being an ex- 
minister of the gospel, it is surely to be expected (judging by 
what others who have once worn the cloth have done) that he 

must go into one or the other. 

* * * 

Beauty doctoring has become a fad, an expensive one, too, 
and every girl or woman between the ages of sixteen and seventy 
years, who does not have a beauty doctor to take care of her body 
from her hair to the tips of her toes, is not an up-to-date repre- 
sentative of the highest degree of cultured elegance. 

Years ago, only the wealthy could indulge in this luxury, and 
could only obtain the "treatments" in New York or Paris, but 
how different to-day. Beiiuiv doctors abound everywhere; any 
girl or woman can Learn the business quicker than anything 
else, and in a few months are able to practice a lucrative business 
wilb very little outlay tor material. The ordinary "doctor" who 
i reals all classes ti'om the girl who works in the cannery or fac- 
tory to the Heiresses ill the cheap theatres, manicuring llni 

nails, bleaching or dyeing their hair, is entirely in a diiferenl 
class from the handsomely gowned, be-diamonded creatun 
perhaps rides in an automobile, having her own chauffeur, and 
gives high-priced treatments to ladies of fashion in home.- oi 

wealth. 

'Plie only difference in (he high-priced treatments an 
others given in the beauty parlors is the style and exclusiveness. 

It has become a fad, with some women in the Baj cities 

would not dare to have their husbands knon the m me] so Fool- 
ishly spent in this way. 

An Oakland "doctor" stands up for her sex, ami savs she has 

quite a number of male patrons, who go to her private office to 
have their craniums massaged with vaseline fm- baldness, this 
treatment being given Foi one dollar. Possibly this accounts 

for the shining pale- seen so plentifully in public places. 
A Berkeley societj matron, whose beautiful fluffy snow-white 

hair, which adds to the beauty of her delicate pink and white 
complexion, that enables her to wear da I - like pink, 

lighl blue and Nile green thai would look too youthful for one 

of her years, owes her chief attraction, the silvery white hair, 
to the manipulation of her particular "doctor," who was! 
hair twice a week, and rinses in water blued with common, every- 
day indigo, simp'' iter, which accounts for the 
pure whiteness. 

The simple remedies arc among the things thai are pro 
to the business-like beauty doctor, wh harvest from the 

weakness of human nature, and the longe 

the easier the money comes, for she I adept reader ol 

character. If the law required that the deco, lions put up by 
ibis branch of practitioners to be printed on the labels of the 
bottles, hundreds would have to 'lose up their "Beauty Pa 



GREEN 

AND 

YELLOW 




JGREEN 
AND 

YELLOW 



LIQUEUR 



PERES CHARTREUX 



The After-Dinner Liqueur 
of Refined Taste 



At first-class Wine Merchants. Grocers, Hotels. Cafes. 

Batjer & Co.. 45 Broadway. New York. N. Y. 

Sole Agents for United States, 



Vm» 



The City Council of Oakland i- beginning to stir up the Board 
of Public Works on the mailer of constructing public lavatories 
in the City Hall ami Lafayette Parks, according to a resolution 
passed on May 81, 1907. This is a wise move, and as it has 

been referred to Mayor Mott, il is to be hoped thai something 
will be done, and it would add greatly to the health as well ,i< 
comfort of Oakland if Here could be a few more placed in Lin- 
coln Park, Jefferson Street Park and the Baal Oakland ones, 
where children with their parents or nurse* spend Hie greater 
part of the day, to say nothing of the convenience il would be to 
pedestrians. Now, if Mavor Mott wants to do a ithing For 

lie. this i- .unite, and those 

who are watching lat will be done « tly dis- 

appointed if the Mayor fail- to act. 



The Sunset Magazine is to give $2,000 for Bhorl stories. 

The first prize is $500. There are five $100 and five $50 prizes. 

Here is a chance for the California^ of literary tendency to make 
a little side monev. 




Palo Alto Planing Mills 

Our Specialties : 
HARDWOOD INTERIORS 

c/*ND 

VENEERED DOORS 

Estimates cheerfully furnished 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE : 
1105 CHRONICLE BLDG. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 11, 1908. 




INANCIAL 




Sl'RINf; Y ALLEY. 



The solution of San Francisco's 
difficulties with the Spring Valley 
Water Company may be solved in 
only one way. This company owns valuable privileges in the de- 
velopment of which millions of dollars have been expended. In- 
cidental to the increased growth of population and the continual 
betterment of the system, more millions have been spent. The 
owners of the Spring Vallev plant do not occupy the position of 
buccaneers or highwaymen as the dailies would have us believe; 
but are merely humans. There can be no confiscation or condem- 
nation. The city needs newer and better supplies of water. These 
are available. The only solution should be easily arrived at, and 
by the purchase of the reservoir and the distributing system of 
the Spring Valley. Surely there must be some way to arrive at 
a proper valuation of this property ! There is no doubt that over- 
valuation, inflation, possibly, has been indulged in by the owners 
in their anxiety to do their duty by their stock-holders, but that 
ia no bar to a quick arrival at a conclusion of all difficult!-. 



The Solano County Supervisors 
Smelter NUISANCE. have ordered the Selby Smelting 

Company to stop their big plant at 
Vallejo Junction. The Smelting Company has shown no sign 
of complying with the order to place a fume-consuming arrang - 
ment in operation. 



San Mateo is in great danger from 
San Mateo in Danger, the same cause, although the evil 

effects will not be seen until the big 
Guggenheim Smelter is in operation. Scientific men tell US, 
and it is the experience of other communities where such plants 
have been operating, that a. stack of the Guggenheim capacity 
will absolutely kill all tree and plant life in a radius of eighteen 
miles. 



People in California occasionally complain of the irq 

liility of large financial remuneration from the soil. England 
has been giving the question of market gardening very cl 
tention, and the reformatory schools to the number of three hun- 
dred have been turned into quasi-experimental horticultural ami 
agricultural stations. At Eversham, in a private "garden" of 
four and one-half acres, the gross returns of over $1,200 
produced. All of this gardening is under glass. Here in Califor- 
nia the same results might be obtained at less initial expense by 
the use of hedge rows and by irrigation, and the same intensive 
cultivation obtained. It i« figured that "French" gardening is 
now carried on in England with .a yearly profit on each acre of 
$500 to $650. It is about time that our Californians took to 
this kind of scientific farming to show what the land is really cap- 
able of doing, not under glass, but in the open air. The Cali- 
fornia farmer is noted chiefly for his profit taking from gener- 
ous nature, and his prolific wasting of her gift ! 

There has been a decrease of 4.2 per cent in the railroad earn- 
ings for the fiscal year 1907-8. This decrease is not significant, 
as it simply shows the balancing of the extreme tag end of the 
prosperity wave, and the first of the stringency. It must be re- 
membered that the gross earnings of the railroads for the last 
three years have actually increased by the enormous sum of 
$400,000,000, and the increase in net earnings has been but 
$27,275,000. For every dollar in gross receipts the railroads 
have been able to save only six and three-quarters cents for an 
operating profit. 



Dullness prevails, and is srenerally due to the summer vacation 
season. Money continues easier, and there is no very great 
demand for commercial accommodation. Realizing that this is 
the best time to build, when all material is at the lowest possible 
ebb, the demand for building loans is greater than at any time 
■since the beginning of the stringency. Building is going on 
briskly. 



The election preliminaries, the summer vacation season, the 
lack of interest in mining securities, speculation and many other 
conditions, tend to dullness, and yet business in general does not 
seem to suffer. The most significant circumstance in connection 
with the market is, indeed, that its underlying strength is un- 
diminished, and that there have been no business disturbances en- 
defaults, and that such as there was were treated with quiet in- 
difference. 



The statements of the various banking institutions show a 
most healthful condition. The Hibernia Savings and Loan 
Society is one of the best ever issued by that splendid organi- 
zation,' a perusal of the details in the display columns of lie- 
News Letter of to-day will interest any one who is at all curious 
as to the people's savings in San Francisco. One peculiarity of 
the assets of the Hibernia Savings and Loan Society is, thai they 
are all of them in California, and that such real estate as it holds 
(situated in the city and county of San Francisco) belongs to 
the corporation, and is productive for the most part. 



Attention is called to the statement of the San Francisco Sav- 
ings Union, published on another page. This statement shows 
a very healthy condition. 



There is an appreciable influx of money into business channels 
which is said to be due to a re-depositing of hoardings. One rea- 
son for an increase in bank deposits is the enormous amounl of 
money paid to business houses in connection with the provision- 
ing of the fleet previous to its departure. 



The reports from the State at large tend to show that there 
will be a much larger crop of f mil this year than last. Apricol 
and peach drying is goins on on a larger scale than ever before 
in the history of the State. The grain is filling out well under 
ideal conditions. 



To Mr. Sam Berger, the popular well-known now Li i 

dasher and former amateur heavyweight champion, greal credil 
is due. After showing his prowese in the padded ring, be i n- 
gaged in business with his brother Nat, the former manager of 
Moss's, Inc.. clothiers and haberdashers, and they now condui 
the well-known firm of Bergers Haberdashery, 1149 Fillmore 
street. The prominence of location, personal popularity, coupled 
with close attention to business details and highly developed ar- 
tistic sense, has tended to develop their business to an enormous 
extent, with the result thai their -bop to-day is ranked with the 
best the city affords. Mr. Sam Berger is quite an actor in an 
amateur way, and frequently appears in private and charitable 
theatricals. He made a decided hit in a recent dramatic pro 
duction at the Van Ness Theatre. 





HIGH GRADE 


INVES [ IT1E5 




LIST ON REQUEST 




SUTRO & CO., Brokers 


TEL. K. 332 


412 MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



J. C. Wilson, Broker 



Member Stock and Bond Exchange. Stocks 
and Bonds, Investment Securities. 482 Cali- 
fornia St., San Francisco, Kohl Building. 
Telephone Kearny 815. 



Zadig & Co., Stock Brokers 

Tonopah, Goldfield, Bullfrog, Manhattan, 
Comstock, Fairvievv and Rawhide Stocks. 
Have option on shares best Rawhide proper- 
ties for a few days only. 324 Bush Street. 



July 11, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



15 



TEE BLUE AND THE GRAY. 

So with an equal splendor 

The morning sun-rays fall, 
With a touch, impartially tender, 

On the blossoms blooming for all. 
Under the sod and the dew, 

Waiting the judgment day — 
Broidered with gold, the Blue, 

Mellowed with gold, the Gray. 

So when the summer ealleth 

On forest and field of grain, 
With an equal murmur falleth 

The cooling drip of the rain. 
Under the sod and the dew, 

Waiting the judgment day — 
Wet with the rain, the Blue, 

Wet with the rain, the Gray. 

Sadly, but not upbraiding, 

The generous deed was done: 
In the storm of the years that are fading 

No braver battle was won. 
Under the sod and the dew, 

Waiting the judgment day — 
Under the blossoms, the Blue. 

Under the garlands, the Gray. 

No more shall the war-cry sever, 

Nor the winding river be red ; 
They banish our anger forever, 

When they laurel the graves of our dead 
Under the sod and the dew. 

Waiting the judgment day — 
Love and tears for the Blue, 

Tears and love for the Gray. 

— Fraiu 



is THilea Finch. 



The Use of Wokds. 

subjects seem humorous. 



The daily press is fond of the word 
"holocaust." ami nearly always uses 
it in such a way as to make serious 
One of the dailies referred to the r 
in Oakland as a "holocaust." Tin' fifteen-dollar-a-week youths 
wlin edit the news columns of lb'' press should I"' compelled to 
refer to lb" dictionary occasionally. II ma] be thai the Exami- 
ner, the Call an. I the Bulletin 'I" not possess a dictionary, ami 
for their benefit the News Letter submits the following: The 
word is derived from the Greek "holos, or whole; kauso to burn — 
bolokausto, holokaustos. A aa< i ifice the whole ol i 
consumed in- lire, nothing being retained. I 
limes applied to a general of life or a slaughter." The 

[Tews Letter baa bum led, afteT a year's very bard woi 

compelling the dailies to make a rone. I use of an. I 
spell the word 'restaurateur." Ii is lo be hoped thai it will nol 
be necessary to refer to the idiotic use made of the word "holo- 
caust" more than 16 lis - 



Sift* Srtttij About (Guatemala 

Diego Estrada Cabrera, the son of Manuel Estrada Cabrera, 
president of Guatemala, is himself authority for a denial of the 
reports that come from the Central American Republic to the 
effect that indignities have been heaped upon women sympathiz- 
ers of the revolutionists, and that boy cadets have been executed 
by the wholesale. Young Cabrera, who is a well known figure 
socially here, alleges that the numerous highly-colored stories 
that have been circulated to this effect are none other than politi- 
cal libels advanced by the Conservative party with a view to cre- 
ating prejudices. 

He has been keeping in communication with President Car- 
brera and others in Guatemala, and says the engineered move- 
ments against the Government are on the wane, and that matters 
have righted themselves considerably since the attempted assassi- 
nation of his father. 

He deolares that the opposition is not against his father, but 
the principles of the Liberals for which he stands sponsor, and 
it is being financed by a cabal of wealthy aristocrats identified 
with the Conservatives. Cabrera's domination of the Liberal 
party has been particularly obnoxious to many of the Guate- 
malan "higher-ups." He was responsible for the increased scale 
of wages for laborers and the export tax on coffee, two thing.: 
especially hateful to the Conservatives, who believe in holding 
to the old custom of keeping the masses in ignorance. Anything 
that tends to interfere with the system of vassalage that has so 
long prevailed in the republic is looked upon by the Conserva- 
tives as a dangerous innovation, especially when it hits the 
pocket-books of th'e opulent plantation owners. In short, the 
Liberals stand for enlightenment and advancement, and the 
Conservatives want things to remain as they were, and it is this 
fact that has been responsible for the revolutionary movements 
directed against the present Liberal administration. 

Among other charges made against the Government by the 
Liberals is the one regarding the censorship of reports. This ac- 
cusation, avers Cabrera, is quite as untrue as the charge that 
there has been an indiscriminate execution of boy cadets iden- 
tified with the revolutionists. A number of cadets have been 
shot for taking part in the uprisings, he admits, but the sentences 
were imposed only after the cadets were tried by a regular court- 
martial. The revolutionists were resorting to such darin 
tics that summary methods had to be employed to cheek the 
moven 

He also refuses to believe the report that Senora Josephine 
I Mo de Lopez, one of the fugitives on her way here from San 
Salvador, was stripped after having been imprisoned, and forced 
to submit to indignities from the guards because she had dis- 
! sympathy for Bastiilo, the Honduran Minister of Finance. 
He heatedly declared that his father comes from an an 
that never made war upon women. 



MADE IX NEW YORK. 



People have to be imported from the effete Hast in order that 
San Prancisi ana ma.] beai ollowing : 

"In the current issue of Harper's Weekly. Wil 
gives a remarkable account of the battle with the plague no* 
ing conducted in San Francisco. More than a million rats have 

ien killed in (he s.ui Francisco plague campaign within tb 
year. Traps and poison, and l>an\ sz's virus, which prodo 
mild form of typhoid fatal to rats an.! harmless to man. 

n the principal means used. One da\ last November two ! 

rs named Bowers, one aiz, the other seven years old, found a 
dead rat while they were at play. They put it in a small 

id box and played at jiving it a funeral. Within a we. 

ire family of seven persons was ill with fever, attended 
delirium. The family was removed to i pi '!. where, 

after much questioning the doctors learned from tb. 

rv of the mock funeral. The body of the rai 
and an examination showed that the animal had died oi bu 
plague. Everythii was done to aid thi Bowers family, 

but the] her. mother, grandmother, and four child- 

leaving only one survivor, an infant two months 



E. B. Courvoisier, frame maker, 1374 Sutter street, bet. 

Van Ness and Franklin. Allow me to estimate on your regilding. 



SECURITY SAVINGS BANK 



316 MONTGOMERY STREET 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Authorized Capital - 

Paid Up Capital - 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 



$1,000,000.00 

- - 500,000.00 
- - 332,000.00 



Interest at 
the rate of 



4 



per cent 
per annum 



was paid on deposits for six months ending June 30, 1908. 

DIRECTORS: WM. BABCOCK, S. L. ABBOTT, O. D. 
BALDWIN, JOSEPH D. GRANT, E. J. McCUTCHEN, L. F. 
MONTEAGLE. R. H. PEASE. WARREN D. CLARK, JAS. L. 
FLOOD, FRED W. RAY, J .A. DONOHOE. JACOB STERN. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 11, 1908. 




-{ THE 



GRAMMAR VS. LOVE. 

Pretty maiden, Tim's me name, 

I'm a simple naval gent. 
Ain't ye glad when 1 have came. 

Ain't ye sad when I have went? 
Ain't I nothin' to yer? Oh, how 
Can I seem not nothin' nohow? 

When I scan the starlit sea 
Sorrow stieketh in me eraw. 

•'Moon." I says, "how I love she! 
Yet I seen what I have saw — 

Her and him just gettin' dearer, 

Me not never nowise nearer." 

Can't ye never care for I ? 

Artst thou keeping something hid? 
Do I git the cool go-by 

For some deed I didn't did? 
I dost love thou till I'm dippy — 
Thee dost treat me something snippy. 

Oft I think, thinks I— like that— 
"If I done did suicide 

Wouldst she come where I was at, 
Saying: 'I wouldst be thy bride!' 

Or wouldst she, when I was founded, 

Cogitate, 'Was best he's drownded!'" 

I'll not say no more — I've spoke ! 

Yet how nice if thou butst wouldst 
Marry I. a simple bloke. 

Who'd support thee — for I couldsl ! 
Ain't I nowise needed ? Oh, how 
Can I seem not nothin' nohow? 

— Wallace Irwin in Smith's Magazine. 



They were discussing the international marriage question the 
other day on the veranda of the Burlingame club house. Some 
one said that since Jean Reid had chosen a foreigner she might 
as well have plucked the fruit that grows on the top of the tree. 
"Her husband is, alter all, a plain Mr.;" lamented a lady whose 
respect for the nobility is perfectly natural, considering that her 
father is a wealthy wholesale grocer, and she has attained her 
position through marriage. A woman who belongs to the F. 
V. V.'s interposed an objection. "It was not a title that appealed 
to Jean. What she wanted, probably, was the sort of man that is 
(he product of an old civilization, a man who has time to do her 
bidding, to listen to her, to answer her, to understand her. A 
man who brings with him an atmosphere of ancient glory before 
which mere commercial success pales as does the moon before the 
sun. The American father is ambitious and democratic, but be 
has made his daughter an aristocrat without a court, a goddess 
without an atmosphere to realize her ideals. Therefore, the 
American girl is forced to turn her eyes beyond the sea. The 
superiority of the man at her side is not of a kind to touch the 
imagination of women not sensitive to business success. A man 
who has no other charm than that of money seldom breaks a 
heart. 

"Jean Reid is like other girls who have traveled much, whose 
special education at home and abroad has given them a nature 
which thirsts for things unobtainable in America. She is more 
touched by the warlike feats of the ancestors of decadent aristo- 
crats than by the personal courage of the American man, who 
single-handed could make or break a trust." 

Of course, there was a chorus of objections to the statement 
that the "sympatica" man is an unknown species on this con- 
tinent. This man and that man of leisure was held up as a 
sample of the brand we produce, but the F. F. V. said that we 
had not yet learned to distinguish between a "fashionable bum" 
and a man of "broad culture and leisure." And just then a 
man came along and ordered a tizz all around and the argument 
was drowned out. 



PENINSULA 



> 



SAN MATEO, CALIFORNIA 

A Twentieth Century Hotel of the Highest Degree of excellence. Amer- 
ican and European plan. Open February 22, '08. Thirty minutes by 
rail from San Francisco. Located in a Beautiful Park of thirty years' 
cultivation. All the charm and delight of the country combined with the 
attractions and conveniences of the metropolis. For reservations or 
information address 

JAS. H. DOOL1TTLE, Manager 



San Mateo, California 



One thing is- certain, every year we are, learning to distill 
more joy out of country homes, and the influence of those who 
have summered in England has revolutionized things. -Mis. Will 
Crocker brought back the good old-fashioned custom of a picnic- 
last year, and this summer, instead of so much afternoon tea 
drivel, people are enjoying the pastimes dear to the heart of the 
English country gentleman. Last week-end there was three 
days merry-making at the E. W. Hopkins country home in 
Menlo Parle, in honor of Miss Florence, the charming debutante 
daughter of the family. Every hospitable home in the neighbor- 
hood was crowded with guests, who could not be accommodated 
in the Hopkins home. The first day there was a jolly picnic. 
with a long drive as a preliminary canter to the frolic of a genu- 
ine picnic lunch. Next night an informal dance brought every 
one in the younger set together, and although this was not the 
official "coming out" party for Miss Florence, it is sale to predict 
that: no formally appointed affair given in her honor will ever 
bubble with so much genuine gayety. On Sunday afternoon, tic 
Burlingame club house was tilled with luncheon parties, and in 
the afternoon, every one made the rounds of the hostesses who 
served tea — a constantly moving procession in a sort of progres- 
sive tea party. 

Mrs. H. P. Young, who was Miss Marie Voorhies, will arrive 
in San Francisco on the Sheridan, and visit her mother for sev- 
eral months before leaving lor her husband's new station in New 
York. Her home coming is a sad one. as death has removed her 
father from the family circle, and Mrs. Young was her lather's 
particular chum. She is not very well, herself, the enervating 
climate in the islands and the news of her father's death having 
proven too much for her. but her visit will doubtlessly restore 
her to perfect health. 

Boss Valley and San lial'aol have had bridge fever the last 
two weeks, hardly a day passing that has not been enlivened by 
a bridge party. Mrs. William Prentiss Morgan, who is staying 
at Hotel Rafael, is one of the best players in the older set, and 
she has aroused enthusiasm in several others who were content 
to be fair players, but are now determined to get into the expert 
class, and as a result, the standard of playing has gone up several 

notches this summer. It is rather a remarkable fact that si ■ 

of the lust players in San Francisco society belong to the set 
of young matrons. As a rule, older women carry off the prizes 
in bridge because they have eliminated everything but sedentary 
sport from their lives, and so can spend much lime al the card 
tables, whereas the younger women have dozens of pleasures and 

pastimes thai compete with bridge. Nevertheless, if a list were 
drawn up of the very best players, il would contain a surprising 
number of young women. 



Hotel St. Francis 

The comfort of the present is 

built upon the complaints of 

the past.' 

Coder In* m.n.jement •( JAMES WOODS 



Jul* 11, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



Frederick II. Newell, director of the United 
States Reclamation Service, is at the Hotel St. 
Francis, where he is to meei and confer with Sec- 
retary ol the [nterior Garfield. Secretary Gar- 
Seld has just returned from the islands on the 
U. S. S. St. Louis. 

Commodore W. F. Stone's sloop flagship Presto, 
of the Corinthian Yacht Chili fleet, added to her 
many victories last Sunday by winning the hand- 
some Hotel St. Francis cup in the handicap race 
of the Corinthian Club from Vallejo to El Campo. 
Despite the fact that the Presto lost fully four 
minutes in crossing the starling line, she won the 
race by three minutes flat from the Nixie. Seven- 
teen yachts competed. 

R. C. Stoddard, Attorney-General of Nevada, is 
registered at the St. Francis with his niece. 

Samuel Piatt, recently appointed U. S. Attor- 
nev-General for the District of Nevada, is at the 
Hotel St. Francis. 

Mrs. Fiske, who has never allowed society to 
use her as People's Exhibit A, at fashionable 
crushes, has heretofore refused all invitations to 
Burlingame. But while Mrs. Will Crocker was in 
New York this winter she met the actress who 
stands for the intellectual in the drama, and these 
two clever women were greatly attracted to each other. Last 
Sunday Mrs. Fiske spent at the beautiful Burlingame home of 
the Crackers, and an informal luncheon was given in her honor. 
The Frederick Sharons, Miss Law lor and Mr. Forrest completed 
the congenial little party. 

The sailing of the fleet on Tuesday left a large dent in the 
social world, and it will he some time before we feel compen- 
sated for the pleasures on shipboard which have been ordered 
away. Cupid got busy al the lasl moment, and before the Ver- 
mont pulled anchor, every one was congratulating Lieutenant- 
Commander F. C. Bertolette on his engagement to Miss Lucile 
Meigs. Miss Meigs is a very handsome girl, slightly resembling 
her cousin. Mrs. John Sroufe Merrill. Her father, who died 
some years ago, was al one lime a very wealthy Nevada ranch 
owner. Miss Meigs has made her home with her mother in this 
city for several years, and the wedding will lake place here as 
soon as Lieutenant Bertolette can gel his shore leave. 

Recent arrivals at. the Sainl .lames in San -lose are: Salvador 

M. Galicia, of Guatemala; I'. Cabrera, of Guatemala, -on of the 
President of Guatemala; W. I.. Cochran ami wife, San Fran- 
cisco, of National Cash Register Co.. touring to Santa Cruz; 
Mabry MeMahon and family, ical estate dealer of San Rafael; 
E. I'. Eeald ami wife, San Francisco; II. E. Wilde. San Fran- 
cisco; W. E. Gibson, Oakland: \\ . ( '. Schuppell, San Frs 
here lo attend the Congress of Commercial Teachers; Colonel 

E. A. Preble, of San Francisco, of Governor Gilletfs staff; Mr. 
and Mrs. I.. A. Cross, J. C. Skinner and \\iie. auto party from 
Stockton; F. F. Engstrum, of Los Angeles, the well-known 
builder, here io commence the construction of the now insane 
asylum al Agnews; Mr. and Mr-. II. (J. Lacy, •'. M. Lacy and 
d. F. Richmond, automohiling from Ranford to Santa 

Mr. Lewis I'.. \\eiv. ol 1,'edlands, Cal., new principal a S 
Jose High School; Messrs. C. S. Howlaud and wife and II. R. 
( 'ens ins and wife of Hanford, Cal., automobiling to Santa Cruz; 
Otis A. Longley and family, of Fresno, on wax to Sanl 
in automobile; VV. T. Hunter, traveling passeng of the 

Northwestern Railroad, headquarters at San Francisco; Karl 

F. Kraft, of San Rafael, on his way to Santa Cruz with famih 
on their annual outing by drive; Mr. and Mrs. E. J. v 

Miss Lillian Stanton, Mi-- Adelaide Stanton, Roy Stanton, Mrs. 
.1. c. Fan-ell. prominent lumberman ol Los Angeles, making 
automobile lour of the State: E. F. Sonthworth and wife. Miss 
South worth M — Jeannie Govan, automobile party en ro 
Santa Cruz; L. Demartini and wife, San I'm attend 

at Santa Clara ■ nation 

of their .-on. Louis Demartini, Jr.; F. T. Fergusxjn, 11. M. War- 

1 1 .. prominent hanker- ol San l.m- 
.Indah. manager Peck's Bureau, on wai to Santa < v ; Miss 
(Catherine Q Ruff, M ss Man Ri '. old residents of San Jose. 
now- lu ing ai 1 1. ean Pat >. Cal. 

Enthusiasts in the tennis world arc much delighted over tie 

fact that it lias Seen definitely announced thai Miss M 

woman tennis champion ,.| the world, will phi} on the courts of 




SOUPS 

Stews and Hashes, Fish, Meats, Game, Salad:, 
etc., can be delicately seasoned by using 

LEA & PERRINS SAUCE 




TH E 
Beware of Imitations. 



ORIGINAL WORCESTERSHIRE 

John Duncan's Sons, Agents, New York 



the Hotel, Eafael at San Eafael on Saturday and Sunday next. 

Miss Sutton will leave Los Angeles on the "Owl"' Thursday 
evening, arriving in San Francisco Friday morning, and wiil 
proceed at once to San Uafael on a short visit to friends. On 
Saturday, July 11th, at. 3 p. m. she will play Miss Hazel llolch- 
kiss, of Berkeley, present State champion, an exhibition single 
match. 

On Sunday, July 12th, a number of matches have been ar- 
ranged among the tennis cracks. Miss Sutton, with Maurice 
McLaughlin, present coast champion, will probably play in the 
mixed doubles against Melville Long and Miss Hotchkiss, or 
Miss Golda Meyer. Mr. Lou Freeman, al one time coast cham- 
pion, will also he here from Southern California, and will play iu 

exhibition games with George .lanes. Carl Gardner ami Maurice 

McLonghlin. It is hoped that Miss Sutton may he induced lo 

play a single match against Maurice McLoughlin, as ther 
been much speculation a- to jusl aovi well Mis- Sutton play! 
with a man champion. If this match is arranged, it will he 
played on Sunday afternoon. 

Mi-- Sutton has nol been seen in Northern California for three 
•a the world's championship ai Wnn- 

heldon, England. She is much lighter than wdien she lirsl p 

THE STAR HAIR REMEDY, the best tonic; restores color to gray 
hair; stops falling; cures dandruff; grows new hair. All druggists. 




MAKE YOUR BEDROOM 

Notable for its expression of refinement and feeling of repose. 
We will gladly* assist you in doing this with our carefully 
selected stock of Wall Paper and Fabrics. We carry the 
things you are looking for, and at the right prices. 
L. TOZER &. SON CO. 
Interior Decorators 

1527 FW St . Betwta Vu No «d Polk. S.. Frudra 
187 Twdflk St. Mr M«k>. CMkind 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 11, 1908. 



here, and wonderfully improved. Miss Hotchkiss, although not 
expected to win from Miss Sutton, is without, doubt far and 
away better than any girl player in this vicinity, and should give 
Miss Sutton a very hard match. 

The management of the Hotel Rafael will give a dance in 
honor of the events on Saturday evening at the clubhouse of the 
hotel, and special arrangement have been made to handle the 
large attendance. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Gee. society leader of Pasadena, spent last 
week at the Peninsula, San Mateo. 

Mrs. 0. P. Jackson, Mrs. A. B. Cook and Mrs. H. A. Hare, 
cha lining ladies whose husbands are officers aboard the Atlantic 
battleships, have given up their apartments at the Peninsula, 
San Mateo, and will follow the fleet to Japan aboard the steamer 
Tenyo Maru. 

Mrs. C. S. Sperry, wife of Admiral Sperry, who has been 
spending several pleasant months at the Peninsula, San .Mum. 
will depart in a few days for her home in Washington. 

A distinguished party of capitalists were stopping at the 
Peninsula, San Mateo, Sunday, consisting of Mr. F. G. Conklin. 
Mr. Jessie P. Meehan, Mr. Irving 0. Lewis, Mr. J. W. Phillip-. 
Mr. (iiles X. Easton and Mr. A. von Adelung, all of Oakland. 

Mr. and Mr?. Z. W. Reynolds, U. S. Navy, entertained charm- 
ingly at dinner Sunday evening at the Peninsula. San Mateo, the 
following ladies and gentlemen: Mr. and Mrs. H. Obear. Mr. 
and Mrs. Eaton, Mrs. Flower. Mrs. Hartford, .Mrs. Shirley. 
Mrs. Cooley, Lieutenant Commander Hubbard, Mr. Bonldby. 

Mr. and Mrs. Melville Schweitzer departed on Tuesday on 
their wedding tour. Mrs. Schweitzer is the daughter of Mr. 
.Mill Mrs. Herman Heyneman. Mr. Schweitzer is a member of 
the firm of J. Schweitzer & Company. Mrs. Schweitzer was very 
popular in society as Miss Loleta Heyneman. 




Uotel Rafael, San Ra 

The Hotel Rafael is having the usual good patronage of 

San Francisco and the Bay Cities elite among its guests at the 
hotel and cottages this year. This is an all the year around re- 
sort, that is in such close proximity to San Francisco that it 
commends itself to all who may desire to live in a perfect cli- 
mate, evade the crowded city, enjoy a period of rest and quiet, 
and yet be, in ease of necessity, in close touch with the metropo- 
lis. The climate of San Rafael is tempered to a nicety, the black 
fog of the bay country is avoided absolutely, and the warm. 
balmy air is health-giving. The hotel itself is surrounded by 
such beautiful grounds that they are a continual delight to all 
who may be fortunate enough to sojourn under the roof of mine 
host Orpin. The week-end guests are quite a feature, and the 
seasonal patronage is of the very best. The Cook's and the 
Raymond Whitcomb Tour parties long ago selected the Rafael 
as the hotel with visiting San Franciscans, because of the ease 
and accessibility, enabling guests to visit the city at will. The 
Casino is the usual stopping place of the motorists on their trips 
to and from Lake County, and in the swing around the Marin 
circle. The table at the Rafael is perfection, and the service is 
prompt. To those who have not as yet selected a summer stop- 
ping place, the News Letter recommends Lhe Hotel Rafael as an 
ideal rest place. 



R B 

• * Get 



P^Xfesrttt^tg^g 



HARTSHORN 



SHADE ROLLERS 

Bear the script name of 
Stewart Hartshorn on 
Get "Improved," no tacks required 

Wood Rollers Tin Rollers 



I 



After % Hattl* 

By W. F. Hereon. 

Prone on the Coliseum floor the gladiators lie, 

And gaze upon the down-turned thumbs that rudely bid them 

die. 
No pity in the surging throng that howls and hoots and jeers. 
Nor deigns to give the fallen men a few perfunctory tears. 
Brave Foraker, whose strident voice was never known to quail, 
Is broken by the Roosevelt club as chaff before the flail. 
Grave Hughes and classic La Follette have perished in their 

pride, 
Nor e'en the mighty Cannon's breath availed to stem the tide. 
Tall Fairbanks, too, has fallen beneath a staggering blow. 
The cocktail story knocked him out. lo ! many months ago. 
Behold the mighty victor stalk across the bloody ring, 
For him the bands are playing loud, the people madly sing. 
He stood aside while Teddy fought and broke each rampant foe, 
And now he smiles to hear them gasp and see their life-blood 

flow. 
Lhsearred he comes from battle wounds, as very well he might 
Small work indeed hadiie to do, when Roosevelt fought his fight. 



Deaf to perplexing questions, and the bruit 
Of local issues now in grave dispute, 
"Red" Hayes is back, our suffrage to implore 
To send him back to Washington once more. 

With sedulous care he holds himself aloof 
From talk of Francis Heney and of Ruef. 
His lexicon contains no word called graft; 
He talks his fill of Roosevelt and of Taft. 

With no desire to mix in local fray, 
His eye set steadily on election day, 
He threatens loudly with repeated boast 
To drive the men of Nippon from the coast. 

He seems entirely deaf and dumb and blind 
On all the questions that perplex our mind. 
But brags that he'll take Cannon by the hair, 
And hurl him bodily from the Speaker's chair. 



THE CALIFORNIA EYE. 
is almost constantly Irritated by Wind and Mineral laden Dust. 
Inflammation, Redness, Itching, Burning and Impaired Vision, 
followed by Granulated Eyelids are the Result. 

Murine Eye Remedy gives Reliable Relief. Doesn't Smart ; 
Soothes Eye Pain. Makes Weak Eyes Strong. An Eye Tonic 
Murine Sold Everywhere at 50c. Ask your Druggist. 



Marsh's (formerly of Palace Hotel and Post street) 

have opened at corner of California and Polk street. 



REMOVAL NOTICE 



Thos. Magee c& Sons 

Real Estate o4gents 



NOW LOCATED AT 5 (^MONTGOMERY STREET 
Phone Kearny 563 



Jui.t 11, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



19 




®ij? New ^wretarg of 




General Luke E. Wright, of Tennessee, who recently succeeded 
William H. Taft, Eepublican candidate for the Presidency, as 
Secretary of War, is a polished Southern gentleman of the old 
school. There is only a corporal's guard of his kind still sur- 
viving in the Southland, and the reason they call him "General" 
is because at one time during his long and illustrious career as 
lawyer, statesman and diplomat, he was Attorney-General of 
liis native commonwealth. The army is expecting great things 
of General Wright, as war minister, on account of his sound 
judgment, simple but sterling character, broadness of mind, and 
fearlessness of decision and action. 

General Wright has been a life-long Democrat. When 
Democracy split on the free silver rock, in 1896, he lined up with 
the gold wing of his party and fought a valiant campaign for the 
Gold Democrats' presidential ticket, headed by Palmer and Buck- 
ner. Afterwards, when President McKinley installed what is 
now known as the "Taft Commission" in the Philippine Islands, 
to inaugurate civil Government there, General Wright was ap- 
pointed one of the members with the office and title of vice- 
(iovernor. His public career in the Philippines was a great* 
success. Much of the time he was vice-Governor he acted as 
Civil Governor in the absence of Mr. Taft, and when the latter, 
was finally transferred to Washington as Secretary of War, 
General Wright succeeded him at the head of the Insular Gov- 
ernment, -with the title of Governor-General, an old Spanish 
.designation which the Washington Government revived for the 
purpose of more clearly distinguishing between the chief execu- 
tive of. the islands and the Provincial Governors. Hence, Gen- 
eral Wright can boast of being (he Erst American Governor- 
General of the Islands as well as their second chief civil execu- 
tive. Under the Spanish regime, the Governor-General was 
both civil and military administrator. 

During General Wright's incumbency of the Governor-Gen- 
eralship, he was very popular with the Occidentals, but it was 
impossible for Mr. and Mis. \\ right to maintain the close social 
intimacy with the Filipinos thai Mr. and Mis. Taft had so suc- 
cessfully established. To use a vulgar expression, they were not 
built that way. Both were born, reared and educated in the 
South, and both possessed to a marked degree the Southern 
ideas about society as affecting the races. Ii was, therefore, n<>i 
to be wondered at that :i Bocial bai lid grow up between 

the natives and the American occupants oi Malacanan Palace, 
the official residence of the Governor-General. This in itself 
created no end of confusion. The influential and rich Filipinos 
began to whimper and accuse General Wright of discrimina 
against the natives in favor of the whiles, in his administration 
of their public affairs. The lad ained that they were not 

properly treated wh i at Malacanan ; that they wore 

snubbed and made to feel very small when they paid their re- 
spects there. Finally, affairs assumed such a serious phase that 
lb,' President instructed Secretary Taft to look the matter over 
personally when he reached Manila to inaugurate the Philippine 
Assembly, in 1907, with a view to reconciling the natives. 1 
lie attempted to do. but just about the time he thought he ha, I 

situation well in hand, an incident occurred which ahatb 
all his del acj into a thousand fragments and 

eventually forced the withdrawal of Governor-General W 
from the Philippines. 

The central Government at Manila had summoned all tile 
Provincial Governors to the capital city to welcome v 
Taft. Among them was any, the present Governor of 

the Territory of Arizona, then Governor of the Provin 
mar. Governor Curry had been a commissioned officer in the 
famous "Rugh Rider" regiment, and was a warm personal friend 
of President Roosevelt. II - so an ardent admirer of 

General Wl 

During Secretary IV'- I sit, Cm B \lealde or 

lie Amerii >r Curry, 

aarles Curtis of K.u - 



men Newton W. Gilbert of Indiana (now a Judge of the Court 
of First Instance of the Philippines), William M. Howard, of 
Georgia, and William D. McKinley of Illinois. Alcalde Herrera 
was a prominent Filipino lawyer and politician, and had been 
appointed to the Presidency of the Municipal Board of Manila, 
originally, on account of his political conservatism and pro- 
American sympathies. While Mr. Taft was at the head of the 
Insular Government, Herrera kept within the traces, but when 
General Wright succeeded to the chief executive's chair, Herrera 
began to buck, as it were. What caused the final rupture between 
General Wright and the Alcalde is known to few outside the 
"inner circle," but at the banquet referred to, and during the 
toasts, Herrera gave vent to a tirade against the Governor-Gen- 
eral and his family that simply paralyzed the ears of his guests. 
Governor Curry was sitting very near Herrera, and before him 
was an untouched glass of wine. When Herrera's vituperations 
reached the acute stage, Governor Curry suddenly stampeded 
the banquet by springing to his feet, giving the lie to Herrera's 
words, and dashing the contents of the wine glass full in the 
Alcalde's face. 

Of course, this forcible and violent resentment of Herrera's 
insults brought the banquet to a sudden and sensational end, 
and set the whole town afire with excitement. When Secretary 
Taft heard of the incident, he was indignant, and when it came 
to the ears of General Wright it is said that he expressed a desire 
to hunt Herrera up personally and cane him. His better judg- 
ment prevailed, however, and Herrera was ordered before the 
Secretary of War and Governor-General for an explanation. The 
Alcalde appeared in a very penitent frame of mind, apologized 
to General Wright for what he had said, and promised that if 
he was forgiven it would not happen again. Of course lie was 
forgiven, but at the same time he was ousted from office in dis- 
grace. 

Both Secretary Taft and Governor-General Wright realized 
thai tin' effect of the Herrera incident on the Filipinos, by whom 
the Alcalde was highly esteemed, would greatly impair thi 
ernor-General's administration, and although Secretary Tali 
at the time withheld any intimation to that effect, General 
Wright and bis friends fully realized that the day was not far 
distant when he would be recalled. 

And their suspicions proved only too well founded. As soon 

as the Washington Government could make the transfer gri 

fully, and without casting any reflections on General V 
and his administration, it was done. He sailed from Manila 
ostensibly on leave of absence, and went to Washington. When 
the time was ripe, and the Washington Government recognized 
Japan as a first-class power, General Wright was sent as first 
United States Ambassador to the Mikado's Government, an,] 
V ice-Governor-General Henry C. Ide of Vermont, father-in-law 
of Bourke Cochran, and recently one of the receivers of the 
Knickerbocker Trust Company, of New York, succeeded him 
as Governor-General of the Philippines. 

For the Filipinos. Secretary Wright still has a deep solicitude. 
and as the executive head of the Bureau of Insular Affairs 
of the War Department, through which the Government of the 
Philippine Island is practically dictated, there is little doubt but 
that he will continue the general policy of "benevolent assimila- 
ioii" maintained bv his predecessor. How the Filipino political 
agitators regard his appointment to the war portfolio, however, 
is still an open question. 

Herman Heyneman has issued an announcement thai 

from and after the first of July, the business heretofore con 
by him would be continued as Herman Heyneman & Sun. In- 
ited, at 325-3."-' reet. 

THREE GENERATIONS OF HEALTHY BABIES 

■on successfully raised on Borden's Eagle Brand Condensed Milk; 
n.ore each year than all so-calied "infant foods" combined. Thousand* 
>f unsolicited testimonials received annually from physicians and grateful 
arents testify to the merits of Eagle Brand 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 11, 1908. 




VOIOME 



y^L 



The proposition of automobile racing has once again come to 
the front. Locally, there is a tendency to race motor-cars on the 
track. The last twelve months the News Letter lias fought this 
proposition, and in keeping with this policy, il must put its 
stamp of disapproval on those who have taken place, and arc 
going to take place in the future Tt is a death-dealing game) 
and when one sees lives snuffed out, as they were on Tuesday in 
the great French race, on a road where the chances of accidents 
are less than on the track, and where the event was handled by 
military authorities and officials, whose experience makes them 
able to carry off an event as nearly perfect as possible, what musi 
he the result here, where the contests are bui crudely managed. 
Here the lack of money prohibits precautions that might lend 
extra safety to the occasion. Therefore, from pasi experience, it 
borders on crime to hold automobile races on the road, much less 
on the track. 

* * * 

The second annual Mitchell Jubilee has taken place. By 
those who were not fortunate enough to he present, il has prob- 
ably been forgotten, but by the Mitchell Family and their friends 
ils many pleasant features are still a happy memory, and the 
subject for much reminiscence and conversation when two of 
the clan meet. On the morning of July third, like the Scots 
of old, they gathered at the meeting place, the headquarters of 
the Mitchell cars in this city, the (inn of ((sen & Hunter, and it 
was a goodly gathering. About nine o'clock, the pilot ear. 
a Mitchell roadster, ably handled by Miss Marion Wblcott, who 
had as her guests Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Hunter, led the way on the 
run to San .lose. The route lay out Golden Gate avenue to 
Devisadero, along Devisadero to Fulton, skirting the Park Pan- 
handle to Stanyan, then onto the drive through the Park to 
Nineteenth avenue, to the Schwerin Boulevard, to the Mission 
Road, to El Camino Real, and down this highway to the Garden 
City. The course was plainly marked by posters placed at each 
turn, the index pointing in the direction to be taken, and con- 
taining the words, "Mitchell Run." All morning along this 
route might he seen the racey little gra} roadster, or the blue 
runabout, or big blue touring ear of the Mitchell Family, with 
their merry parties on pleasure bent. As cars would meet or 

pass each other, a shout of friendly greeting would I \- 

ehanged, and this same spirit of congeniality continued and 
thrived during the entire three days of the outing. At San 



cTHONOGRAM OILS 

ARE BEING USED BY THE 

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 
AUTOMOBILES and MOTOR LAUNCHES 



Pacific Coast Distributors 

Geo. P. Moore Co. 



721 Golden Gate Ave. 



San Francisco. Cal. 



Jose there was a re-union, as almost every eity in the Stale was 
represented by one or more Mitchell owners, and the third of 
July was certainly "Mitchell Day" in that city. Each ear sported 
a blue pennant, on which was embossed the word "Mitchell" in 

red letters, while a separate colored flag marked with the initial 
of the city or town from which the owner came was carried on 
the radiator, and these, blended with (he national colors, made 
appropriate and artistic decorations. At two-thirty, the cars 
made their way out to Alum Rock Hill, where one id' tin' mosi 

successful hill-climbs in the history of the automobile game in 

the State was held Much lo the surprise of all, the honors of 
the event were carried off by the women owners, who. with the 
exception of I>. Brassy., made the best lime of the day over this 
one mile grade. Mrs. .1. C. Skinner, of Stockton, in a 1908 
model touring car, won the event for that class, in one minute 
and twenty-one seconds, while Mrs. J. C. Broadie was a close sec- 
ond, finishing in one minute twenty-six and three-fifths sec- 
onds. For touring cars of models previous to 1908, L. Brassy 
made the fastest time of the day. in one minute and nineteen 
seconds. The remarkable performance of Miss Marion Wal- 
cott, of San Francisco, winner of the 1908 roadster class, i- 
worlhv of special note. Miss Walcott, who has been driving bul 
two months, and who had only received her roadster a week pre- 
vious to the event, drove it to victory, unaccompanied, in the 
splendid time of one minute and thirty-four -and three-fifths 
seconds, defeating eight other roadster drivers, all of whom were 
of the stronger sex. The trophy for the 1908 runabout even! 
was captured by J. B. Clayton, of San Jose, negotiating the hill 
in one minute and thirty-four seconds. There were thirty-two 
contestants in all. and it was well after six o'clock before the 
presentation of the trophies was accomplished, this being gra- 
ciously attended to by Mrs. (I. Vernor Rogers, wife of Secretan 
Rogers of the Mitchell Motor Car Company, of Racine, Wis- 
consin, assisted by Mis. Dr. Bencpe. of San Jose. The mem- 
bers of the San Francisco contingenl were entertained by a mosi 



It Pays to Know the AUTOCAR 




A 

Business 
Proposition 



Walter C. cTHorris 

WESTERN DISTRIBUTOR 

640 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco 



TYPE XV— $\ 350 



July 11, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



31 



sumptuous banquet in 1 1 u ■ evening, given them by the host of 

the i'ii 1 1 re oui ing, the M itchell < lompam . 

Earlv "ii the morning of the Fourth, the second run of the oc- 
casion, from San Jose to Del Monte, w:is begun, and all the fore- 
noon the highway leading to thai Eamous summer resori was 
swarming with the cars .- 1 1 1 < 1 their Friends, the members of the 
Santa Clara County Automohile Cluh. The route taken was col 
the customarv one. as after Oilroy was reached the turn was made 
over the road running through Chittendon Pass. - to Walsunville, 
Moss Landing and then to Salinas, and on down to the coast 

At Del Monte the ears were received by Secretary Rogers, and 
the glad hand of welcome was extended over the punch howl. At 
three o'clock, in answer to the fanfare of the bugler, from the 
Military Band, the motor guests gathered around the tables, 
which had been spread under the tall pines, close to the club- 
house, and for nearly three hours one of the finest repasts ever 
prepared at that place was indulged in. Everything-, from the 
fruit of the field and tree, to the vintage, was perfect. After the 
courses were cleared away, and the black coffee and cigars were 
passed around. E. S. Martin, in behalf of the Mitchell owners, 
expressed their appreciation in the following resolution: 

"Revolved. That this second annual meet of the Mitchell Car 
Owners has proved a most decided success. The hill-climb was 
all that could be hoped for, and this luncheon has far surpassed 
oni' expectations. 

"Resolved. That we. the Mitchell Car Owners and our friends 
desire at this time to extend our appreciation to our host, the 
Mitchell Car Company and their representatives, Mr. and Mrs. 
Rogers, for all their kindness, and to wish for the company the 
continued success it so well merits, and for ourselves, that we 
may always he able to feel that the company's interests are our 
interests." 

With a few remarks. Secretary Rogers replied, wishing for 
the owners every possible success, thanking them for their enthu- 
siasm in their cars, and expressing his surprise that so many 

i pie could he gathered from the four corners of the State who 

would be so congenial to each other, closing by saying that he 
knew there was no other State that could bring about such a con- 
dition of affairs. 

Many of the owners and their friends, in order to view the 
beauties of the Seventeen Mile Drive, took lo their cars for a 
spin before the festivities of the evening. About nine o'clock 
a most elaborate display of fireworks took place in front of the 
hotel, and so passed out the Fourth, to the strains of the music 

in I he hall room and 1 he boom of bombs and swish of the rockets. 
On Sunday morning, the contest for the Del Monte Cup- tools 
place. The owners making the seventeen mile drive from the 
hotel steps to the steps again, nearest to one hour and a hair, 
were awarded the trophies. To do this necessitated some loafing, 
and much guessing as to time, as ohsi re placed on the 

cars lo see lliat no dme-pieCeS were used. The successful one- 
were Hugo Muller of Oakland and Fred Edwards, w 
exactly on the minute. The cars then returned to their 

making the run around by Santa Cmz. ami over the mountains 

lo Los (iatos. to San .lose, fmni where many wont south, - ' 

east and others north, a'l voting the jiihilcc a most wonderful 

success. There was nol an so ident, and hardly a car needed an 

adjustment in the entire three davs" celebration, and the trouble 

wagon, which followed in the wake of the train, had pra 
nothing more to do than lo assisl in tightening the flags or re- 
plenishing oil or gasoline. Following is the time made on Alum 
Rock hill': 

1908 touring car class First, silver cup, Mr-. J, \V. Skinner, 
Stockton. Cat.. 1.21; second, luncheon outlii in hamper 
R, ( lhase, San .lose. 

Touring ear class, for cars made previous lo I 
lire. 1.. Bras8,<i San -lose. 1:1!': second, F. K. Bebbard, Santa 
Maria, c.il. 1 : 35 : third, goggles, E. I'. Lion, San Jose, l 

1908 roadster class, nine entries— First, tire. Miss Marion 
itt, San Francisco. 1:34 8-6; second, Preet-O-Lite tank. 
\\ . II. Pomeroy, San dose. 1:35: third, tool kit. W. W. Wilson. 
San Francisco. 1 :.'!9. 

1908 runabout class— First, silver cup, .'. B. Clayton, S 
.los,.. 1 :;;(; : scoml. tool kit. Dr. F. F. Patterson, San Jose, 1.:'.:'. 

Runabout class, for cars made previous to IPOS — First, tire. 
Or. C. F. Anderson. San Francis, o. 1,43 1-.",; second, clock for 
Mr. R. 1.. Rigdon, San Francisco, 1.46 3-5; third, chains. 
II. O. 11. Shelley, San Jose, I 

Lad any model — Silver cup presented by N. H. 



Pope-Hartford 

Automobiles 



All Motordom acknowledges 
that it is the "King of Hill Climb- 
ers;" a car of great power, speed 
and quietness, maximum flexi- 
bility, and, above all, absolutely 
the most reliable motor car in the 
world. 



Consolidated Motor Car Co. 

S. C. CHAPMAN, Manager 

406 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

Telephone Franklin 3910. 



Los Angeles Branch 
1018 S. Main St. 



H, W. BOGEN 

Automobile Accessories of all kinds. 
A J AX Tires 



460 Golden Gate Ave. 

Phone Franklin 249 

SAN FRANCISCO 



SAN FRANCISCO 



LOS ANGELES 



Chanslor $ Lyon Motor Supply Co. 



IlKCORrORiTEP' 



Automobile Accessories 

LARGEST AND MOST COM- 
PLETE STOCK ON THE COAST 

Agents for HARTFORD TIRES 



H. D. McCOT 

Secretary tad Maufer 



542-4-6 GOLDEN GATE AVEME 

Saa Fraftcjaeo. CaJ 



LOCOMOBILES FOR HIRE 

SPECIAL RATES FOR THEATRE AND SHOPPING PARTIES. 

GENERAL MOTOR CAR CO. 



Pho.. M.rtet 1198 



14th i.d r.u.ci. St.. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



.lii.-, 11, 1908. 



Neustadter, San Francisco, Miss Marion Walcott, San Francisco, 
1 .34 2-5. 

Ladies' touring car class — Silver cup presented by Mrs. (J. Y. 
Kogers, Mrs. J. C. Broodie, Oakland, Cal, 1.26 3-5. 

Other contestants and time made bv them were as follows: 

S. ft. Pelton, 1908 touring car. '?.12 1-5; 0. A. Longley, 190? 
runabout, 2:02; W. G. Hvman. 1908 runabout, 1:54 3-5: K. 
Gobel, 1908 roadster, 1:52; George Oilman, 1908 runabout, 
1:58; J. Bauer, 1908 roadster, 1:41 2-5; Dr. J. A. Frazer, 1908 
roadster, 1:52 4-5; W. A. Johnston, 1907 touring ear. 1:58; 
Tom A. Deering, 1907 runabout, 2:20: S. P. Elliot, 1908 road- 
ster, 1:45; Miss O. Byron, 1908 touring car, 1:40; Mr. Hettin- 
ger, 1908 touring car, 1 :43 3-5 : Dr. Bryant. 1908 runabout, 1 :42 
3-5; E. Fisher, 1907 runabout, 1 :5(i ; Dr. Hines. 1908 road- 
ater, 1 :49; D. Wilkie, 1907 touring car, 2 :1b' 2-5: W. G. Brown, 
L90' runabout, 2 :21 ; N. Forest, 1908 roadster, 1.54. 

The starters were George Olsen, John R. Chase and G. V. 
Rogers. The time keepers were George B. Polhemus, Dr. Ben- 
epe and A. H. Martin. 

Dr. Rigdon won second in '07 runabout class with the same 
car with which he won first prize with last year, having been 
run 18 months in San Francisco. 

* * * 

The Automobile Club of California lias been doing some ex- 
cellent work in putting up signs along many of the important 
roads of Northern California. A suggestion to the club regard- 
ing signs on certain roads would not be amiss. A sign such as 
"Automobil.ists! Do not take this road," should be placed on the 
Boulder Creek, Saratoga and Los Gatos Road, as well as many 
other mountain roads of Santa Cruz. Mendocino and Lake 
Counties. Such a sign would save a motorist many hours of bad 

roads and great expense in repair bills. 

* * * 

Automobile circles are interested in the policy of insurance 
that is issued by the Insurance Company of North America. This 
company insures against loss or damage by fire arising from any 
cause. This applies, whether the car is in a garage or other 
building, or on the road. Loss by fire, stranding, collision or 
derailment while in the hands of a transportation company, 
loss by the theft in excess of. $25. by persons not in the employ 
of the insured. If an additional premium be paid, the policy 
may be extended to cover loss or damage by collision with any 
moving or stationary object. This policy is one that covers lia- 
bility of assured for damage to the property of others caused by 
collision, and it is what is called a valued policy in that it there- 
by avoids all disputes as to the value of an automobile after a 
less has occurred. 

* * * 

Mr. Cuyler Lee has just received a letter from Mr. IT. D. \\ it 
sun. who is in charge of the office of the Packard Motor Oar 
( lompany in Tan's : 

"While driving from the Automobile Olub of France on the 
Place de la Concorde to the Etoile on the Champs-Elysees in 
company with Mr. W. F. Bradley, of the Automobile Club, we 
saw in this very short run six Packard cars driven by American 
tourists. Since the middle of March up to the present time, no 
litis than twenty-five tourists have visited this office, and asidi 
from this. I have called on several at their hotels. In addition 
to these, there are still a number in the south of France and 
Italy, making in all a total of at least fifty, figuring from a con- 
servative point of view. Using this as a basis, fully two hundred 
Packard cars will have visited this side of the Atlantic during the 
season. 

"One of the most extensive trips made this year is thai of 
Mr. W. J. Chalmers, President of the Commercial and National 
Safe Deposit Company of Chicago. With Mr. Chalmers in 
his Packard 'Twenty-Four' were Mrs. Chalmers and their son- 
in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Graham. After a 
tour in Egypt they joined their motor car at Naples early in 
April, and made a thorough tour of Italy as far as Mestie, whence 
Ihey went to Venice and joined Mr. C. K. G. Billings's party on 
the yacht Margarita for a few days. After this they look hi the 
Ttalian lakes, crossed the mountains to Geneva, thence along the 
coast to Menton, and Monte Carlo, through France into Ger- 
many and across to Carlsbad. 

'"We lost less than four hours by tire trouble on the entire 
trip,' said Mr. Chalmers. 'In a small village below Tours they 
had sown the streets with big tacks, and this cost us two inner 
and two outer tubes. American automobilists who contemplate 




[Made In York] 

"Not only the best, for the price but, the best, at, any price 

Ask the man who owns one." 

Model H Touring Car $2050.00 

6-30 Roadster 2900.00 

4-40 Roadster 3150.00 

Model I Touring Car 3400.00 

Immediate delivery San Francisco at, the above prices. 

Repairing in all Branches, Painting and Supplies. Agents 

Supplementary Spiral Springs 

FRANK O. RENSTROM CO. 

424-446 Stanyan St,. Phone Park 476 



European tours will Bave themselves a lnt of trouble if they join 
either the Touring Club de France or the Royal Automobile 
Club of Great Britain. To get into Italy I had to pay 600 lire 
duty; entering France. 1 had to pay 1,113 francs, and at the 

Austrian border, 2,040 kroner. Of course, this money i- re- 
turned, but it involves carrying a lot of different kinds of money 
on one's person. Bv paying t25 francs to the Touring Club de 
Prance at Paris, I goi a card which enabled me in enter Ger- 
many five time-. This, of course, was refunded when 1 returned 
to Paris, and only cost five francs.' " 

* * * 

Word has been received by the Pioneer Automobile Company 
that the re-union of the Olil-iime.il ists. held in Mew York June 
20th, was a great success. There were in the procession, which 
preceded the old-fashioned picnic, '.'11 Oldsmobiles, carrying 

about 800 people. Two cars in 11 leserve special mention, a 

small single-cylinder curved dash runabout (now known as a 
"popgun") that has traveled more than L0,000 miles, which is 
owned and was driven by R. 11. Eowell ; the other a Eour-cylinder 
car of the type of 1000. that made a perfect score in the Glidden 
tour of that year. This ear is owned and was operated by H. 0. 
Clinton, of the Automobile Club of America. The chief feature 
of the Oldsmobile reunion is to invite all owners of this particu- 
lar make of car to be presenl at a drawing for a $3,000 Oldsmo- 
bile. which is given absolutely free to the one who is fortunate 
enough to have his or her number drawn last. This year the 
lucky number was 129, and was held by L. I,. Smith, nf Eobo- 
ken. 




Correct* Summer 
Auto Attire For 
Men and Women 



"Everything for the motorist but the motor car"— Dust 
coats for men and women, plain and trimmed: hats, caps; 
thermo bottles, lunch baskets; round tire and regulation 
trunks, etc., etc. 

SOLE AGENTS FOR HAWKEYE REFRICERATOR TRUNKS 

(A necessity, not a luxury) 



Van Ness 
at, Bush 



R.OOS BROS. 



O'Farrell 
at, Fillmore 



July 11, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERT IS KU. 



23 



r 



L=1G 



1[=}U 



DDE 



D[=]G 



DG=][ 



Fortieth Anniversary Number 



ti 



JULY OVERLAND cTWONTHLY 



At All News Stands 



CONTENTS: 



FRONTISPIECE HIS EXCELLENCY, WU TING PING I 

FRONTISPIECE ANDREW CARNEGIE 2 

FOUNDING OF THE OVERLAND MONTHLY GEORGE WHARTON JAMES 3 

THE WORST BANKING SYSTEM IN THE WORLD ANDREW CARNEGIE 13 

SPIRITUALISM M. GRIER KIDDER 16 

PRACTICAL PLANS FOR THE HOME BUILDERS DAEDALUS 20 

Illustrated with photographs and drawings by Samuel Newsom and Sydney B. Newsotn. 

SAN FRANCISCO (Poem) HARRY COWELL 25 

A NEW LIGHT IN INDIA RAM NAIII PURI 26 

Illustrated with photographs. 

HANGTOWN ON THE CREEK (Verse) . ALFRED C. GOLDNER 29 

THE UNCHARTED VALLEY (Story) KENSETT ROSSITER 30 

THE STORY OF DUKE K'UNG .... ASHBT FORD 37 

Illustrated with photographs. 

ACROSS THE TABLE (Story) .... WALTER ADOLPH ROBERTS 42 

RESURRECTION (Poem) LANNIE IIAYN'ES MARTIN 45 

BILLY-THE-KID (Story of the Outlaw) . J. E. SLIGH 46 

Illustrated with photographs. 

TO EDWIN MARKHAM (Poem) F. G. MARTIN 53 

Illustrated with portrait. 

THE PACIFIC SHORT STORY CLUB HENRY MEADE BLAND 54 

A NOBLE BIRD-CITIZEN MILLARD P. 'HUDSON . 57 

Illustrated with photograph. 

MODERATION (Poem) LOUISE AYRES GARNETT 60 

THE CIRCE OF LAHONTON BASIN (Story) RICHARD L. RINCKWITZ 61 

PERFECTION (Poem) BARNETT FRANKLIN 65 

SEEING SEATTLE NINA ALBERTA ARNDT 66 

Illustrated with photographs. 

DAWN (Poem) DONALD FRAZER 70 

ARMY VS. NAVY LIFE ARTHIR H. DITTON 71 

NATIONAL SENSITIVENESS .... WILL SCARLET 72 
GALUSHA A. GROW, FATHER OF THE HOMESTEAD 

BILL EDWIN MAXEY 74 

AN OLD MAGAZINE DONALD A. FRAZER 77 

MISS F. SOULE CAMPBELL 80 

Portraits of President Roosevelt and Brigadier-General Frederick Funston. 
NOTED CALIFORNIANS SERIES William Keith and Joaquin Miller. . 85 

IN THE REALM OF BOOKLAND 89 



L" $1.5 



$1.50 THE YEAR 

ir=ii 



][=] 



DDE 



15 CENTS THE COPY 



1U 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEK 



July 11, 1908. 



Mr, and Mrs. Stewart P. Elliott, of Stockton, have been en- 
joying a trip down the coast in their automobile, slopping at Del 
Monte and other points of interest en route. 

* * * 

'those who motored to Pel Monte from San Jose tor the 
Fourth included Mr. and Mrs. ('. C. Pomeroy, Mr. and Mrs. .1. 
L. Stull, F. A. Stull. Miss Clara McCrackin, Mrs. P. J. Byron, 
Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Lion, Paul Lion. Mr. and Mrs. George I!. 
Polhemtis. Charles B. Polhemus, Dr. Frank Patterson, and Mr. 

and Mrs. J. B. Chase. 

* * * 

A pleasant partv of Los Angeles people who motored to Del 
Monte last week consisted of Mr. and Mrs. N. B. Miller, Mr. 
and Mrs. P. M. Clark. Miss Maud Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Straw- 
sor. Mrs. White, Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Edwards and Miss Chand- 
ler. Tlie party made the trip in three automobiles, and after a 
night's rest continued their journey to San Francisco. 
' * * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Cuyler Lee went down to Pel Monte in their 
motor car on Friday, and remained several days. On Sunday 
the Lees made up a partv consisting of Mr. and Mrs. Willis Polk, 
Mrs. George H. Howard. .Miss Frances Howard and Charles 
Polio Peters, and motored over to Point Polios, where the Xavier 
Martinez are in camp, and after dining with them, returned at 
night to Pel Monte. 

» * • 

.. Pel Monte had a very busy week-end. hundreds of people 
having come down from San Francisco and the neighboring 
towns to enjoy the festivities that marked the Fourth of July. 
The lobby of the hotel was gay witli bunting, and the grounds 
were also in gala attire with little red, white and blue emblems 
fluttering from every pinnacle and tower. 

A distinctive feature of the day's celebration was the al fresco 
luncheon which was given on the lawn to (he owners of Mitchell 
cars and their guests. The tallies were spread on the lawn adja- 
cent to the club-house, under the tall pines, and for two hours 
and a half the guests enjoyed one of the most sumptuous repasts 
ever served by the hotel. In the evening there was a splendid 
display of fireworks on the lawn in front of the hotel, and a 
dame in the ballroom. 

Among those who motored from San Francisco to enjoy the 
Fourth of July celebration at Pel Monte were Mr. and Mrs. .T. 
M. Patrick, accompanied by Miss Margaret Patrick and Miss 
Edna Patrick: Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Peters, who had as their 
guests Mr. and Mrs. F. E. Mayhew : Henry Landsburger, with 
Mr. and Mrs. Alexander ITeyneman ami Miss Ella Smith: Mr. 
and Mrs. George Cooper, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. William 
Sloane of New York. 

* * * 

The Gearless Transmission Company, manufacturers of the 
Geerless Cars, are giving away a fine bridge whist score hook. 
Any reader desirous of having one of these may obtain it by ad- 
dressing ih- company at Bochester, New York. 

* * * 

The George V. Pierce Company have issued one of the Snesl 
examples of the catalogue it has ever been our pleasure to see. 
The hook is descriptive of the factory, and the Great Arrow car. 
and it bears as a title the name of "The Factory Behind the 
< 'Mr." Tt is a large book, in size about ten by fourteen, more like 
a portfolio than a book, and it is printed in two colors. The il- 
lustrations are splendid fine screen half-tones, the paper the 
lines! coated book that may be obtained, and the binding perfec- 
tion. The book was designed, engraved and printed by the 
Bartlett-Orr Press, New York City, and it is a marvel of work- 
manship. It is not astonishing that the work should be of so 
thoroughbred a character, when it is taken in consideration that 
it is the product of such a Arm as the George X. Tierce Com- 
pany. Everything they do is thorough. 

* * » 

The Frank 0. Renstrom Company have sold, during the past 
week, Pullman touring cars to the following parties: Mr. Goupe 
of Stockton, Mrs. L. A. Anderson and Mr. J. Looney of this city. 

* * * 

Mr. Fred Linz. of the Maxwell Briscoe Co.. left for the East 
last Wednesday, to visit the three factories of the Maxwell I'.ris- 
coe Co. The principal object of his visit is to obtain a greater 
supply of Maxwell automobiles for the Pacific Coast trade. The 
San Francisco branch has sold and delivered over four hundred 
cars this season. 




Stevens-Duryea Sixes Again Victorious 

In the Hill Climbing Contest held by the Albany Automobile Club. May 23rd 

The Big Six Touring Car with 7-Passenger Body Made 
the best Time of the day of all cars— 53 1-2 seconds 

In 6th Event for 6-cylinder cars STEVENS-DCRTEAS 

RAN FIRST, SECOND AND THIRD. Time: Bio Si*, 

55 seconds; Liiftit Si., 1.01 3-5; Light Six, 1.10 

In the FRHE-FOR-ALL STEVENS-DCRTEAS RAN 

FIRST, SECOND AND THIRD. Time: Bio Sri, 53 1-2 

seconds; Light Sii, 1.02; Light Six, 1.09 

OF EIGHTY ENTRIES 

The Light Six Touring Car nith 5-passenger body made the best time ol 

the day for Touring Cars (with exception of Big Six 

Sterens-Duryea) 1.01 3-5 

A Remarkable Record by u Remarkable C.ir 

PACIFIC MOTOR CAR COMPANY 

376-380 Golden Gate Ave. 
Oakland Branch: 1308-10 Franklin Street. 

Manufactured by SteTene-Dnryea Company, Chicopee Falls, Mass., U. S. A. 



The Auburn Motor Car Co., of this city, haw moved from 
their old quarters on Golden Gate avenue to more spacious and 
commodious quarters at 519-521 Golden Gate avenue. 



AUTOMOBILE AND CARRIAGE 
PAINTING, VARNISHING AND 
TRIMMING. Tops and Seat 
Covers made to order. 

LOCOMOBILE REPAIRING. 
Complete line of Locomobile 
parts. Estimates Given on 
all work. 



The Greenland Co., Inc. 

J. MURRAY PAGE, Mgr. 
Phone Market 1398 287 Valencia St.. 



IGNITION an d at ' e5S expense and inconven- 

TRflllRI P^ i ence to you than at present. Rent 

i nuuDLtd your batteries f rom AUT0 | GNm0N go. 

AVOIDED 709-711 Octavia St., Phone Market 5678. 



July 11, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



25 



Many automobile owners are planning trips to Marin County 
for over the Fourth. Some will go as far as Tomales Hay for 
a dip i" the ocean. Others will make the trip to the Muir 
Woods. Sau Rafael is an objective point for many. 

* * * 

The proposed road to be built by the Supervisors of Marin, out 
of county funds and by popular subscription, to connect Sausalito 
with Bolinas Bay, is to cost in the neighborhood of $25,000. It 
is understood that $12,500 of this money is to be available by 
public subscription. Mr. J. Fred Schlingman of Mill Valley, and 
"Billy" Kent of Kentfield, are moving spirits. The road is to 
follow the hills from Sausalito, until it reaches the "hog-back," 
liclnw which is Mill Valley Heights and the Shriner tract, thenee 
on until it is joined to the Bolinas road. This road will pass 
below Redwood Camp tract, and will open up a lot of beautiful 

country to settlement. 

* * * 

Marin County roads are good, except the bit between Sau- 
salito and Mill Valley Junction. This should be remedied at 
once. 

* * * 

The superior features of the White Steamer were again 
brought into play during the novelty race of one mile. In this 
evenl the cars were 100 yards back of the starting line. The 
drivers ran 100 yards to their cars, drove them to this same 
point, and finished the 100 yards on foot. Waterman was the 
last man to reach his car, but finished at the 100 yard line first, 
anil won the 100 yard sprint to the finish. 

* * :;: 

The machine with which the Fresno motorist won the novelty 
and five-mile open is the same 30 horse-power White stock tour- 
ing car which still holds so many remarkable records about San 
Francisco, among them the Mt. Tama] pais climb, Twin Peaks, 
Fillmore street hills, Witter Springs hill climb and Cliff House 
grade. This car also made the first successful ascent of Mt. 
Diablo, scored a pcil'ccl run in the Endurance Test to Lakeport 
lasl year, won the 10 mile race at Concord for ears costing 
$3,500 ami under, and was first in the 25 mile open race for 
stock cars at Santa Rosa on duly lib. scoring the fastest time 
of any machine. This car was one of the first 1907 machines 

received on this const, and although it has undergone far more 
than is ordinarily required of a machine, is still in splendid con- 
dil ion. 

» * * 

Henry Miller, the well-known actor, wbo appears in the 

"Greal Divide" this week, broughl with him bis Pope-Hartford 

ear. Mr. Miller is a greal devotee oi the motor, driving bis 
own machine on long trips, lie expects during his stay in San 
Francisco to visit many of the resorts in ibis vicinity, which he 

can reach by motor, 

* • • 

San Francisco Count] should have the besl roads in the state. 

when it really has the poorest. 



KEENAN BROS. 

Automobile Engineers, Machinists and Blacksmiths. 
27.? Valencia Street, San Francisco. Telephone Market 1985 



TIPS TO AUTOMOBILISTS 



PALO ALTO— Stanford Auto and Manufacturing Co. renting n 
and sin;. | Imerson 

ivt. Main 78. Machine and repair department, "'ii Alma - 

SAX JOSE— Lamolle Grill. 36-33 North First street. The best French 
dinner in California, 75c, or a la carte. Automobile parties given par- 
ticular attention. 

.SAN JOSB.— WALLACE BROS 1 . GARAGE. Market and St James 
streets Mt of floor ocommodations for 

ladies. Repairing, sundries, renting. Fire proof garage. Day and night 

servii e. 

SAN JOSE— Stop at I. ETCHERS New Garage for first-class service 
the touring public Attractive parlor for ladles In connec- 
tion. "Mission Froi next to corner of First and St. James Sts. 

QILROT, CAL. — George E. Tlce. general machinist, expert repairing of 
automobiles and engines a specialty. Day or night service. 260 N Mon- 
terey street. 

I IMA M< ' me Works Any kind of auto 

repairing. Pull Una oi ■ iilne shop. Corner 



NUF SED 



HOT STUFF 



SPLITDORF IGNITION 

Do you want to be dead sure that your next trip will 
not be marred by any of those tantalizing ignition 
troubles that form nine-tenths of automobile worry? 

There's a way to do it. 

Use Ignition Apparatus that has been tried in the 
crucible of long and severe use and has made good. 

Such is SPLITDORF IGNITION-used today by 
thousands of autoists in races, pleasure trips and 
contests and proved to be ap to the m.rk in every 
reipeot. 

All summed up in four words— "SPLITDORF IGNI- 
TION-NONE BETTER." 

Ask Dept. A for our new 1908 catalog. 

PACIFIC COAST BRANCH, SPLITDORF 
LABORATORY, 520 Van Ness Avenue, San 
Francisco, Cal. 



Pacific Automobile Exchange 

An original automobile repair and tire insurance. 
The contract supplied by this company for a nominal 
sum per month, guarantees your REPAIR and TIRE 
bills for one year. Your car therefore is necessarily 
kept in perfect running condition. Something new and 
worth while investigating. 



465 Golden Gate Avenue 

Phone Market 1425 



San Francisco 



VULCANIZING 

Davis Bros. 

INCORPORATED 

TIRES RETREADED AND MADE NEW 
Phone Park 710 979 Golden Gate Ave 



VULCANIZING 

Stevens & Elkington Rubber Co. 

San Fnnciici, Cal. 



Phone Franklin 612 

524 P.Ik St. neir Golden Giti i.e. 



Reliance Automobile Co. 

GARAGE, LIVERY AND MACHINE SHOP 



PHONES: 



Park 324 
Park 325 



Fulton and Octavia 



Thoaae B. Jetferr 8 Compaej. 117-125 Valencia St.. Saa Fraaciico 



Garage Phone, Market 3337 

.Day) 



Stand Phone, Wilt 7145 
Thompson'. Cafe (Night.) 



Thomas Flyers 

FOR HIRE AT ALL HOURS. 

THE ONLY 6-CYLINDER THOMAS. 

Rapid Garage. 1M1 Market St. J. E. Neumann, Manager. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Jolt 11, 1908. 



The first automobile race to be held in Honolulu was for a 
distance of five miles. There were a large number of cars com- 
peting, and the event was won by a Franklin machine. 

S. G. Chapman, President of the Consolidated Motor Car Co., 
who are agents for the Franklin and Pope-Hartford machines,, 
recently gave out a statement regarding the simplicity and light- 
ness of cars, in which he stated: "Certain it is that the ex- 
perienced buyer is not keen on parting with his money to acquire 
the maximum amount of steel and iron that a designer ran work 
up into the shape of an automobile. 

"The day of 'talking points' is over; the day of real merit has 
arrived, and merit needs no frills. 

"Lightness, consistent with adequate strength, represents the 
guiding star of the up-to-date designer. Every day sees a few 

more 'light weight' converts." 

* * * 

Four Franklin motor cars will take part in this year's Glidden 
Tour. Two six cylinder cars and one 28 h. p. machine will com- 
pete for the Glidden trophy, and one of the little runabouts will 
try for the Hower trophy. These will all be stock motor care, 
and not specially designed machines to meet the requiremen 
this tour. The Franklin Company have never gntered this con- 
test in former years, as they have always felt that il war- more 
nl' a tour than a reliability and endurance contest. This yea* 
the rules are very strict, and they believe the motor ear that goes 
through with a perfect score will have been put to a thorough 

test. 

* * * 

America's reputation in the French Grand Prix, the fastesl 
and most keenly contested automobile race the world has ever 
seen, will be maintained by a Thomas Fiver, with Lewis Strang 
at the wheel. Harry 8. Houpt. who accompanied the team to 
France, writes that training quarters have hern secured at 
Dieppe, and that everything is now in readiness for the greal 
race. 

After a few days on the course, which, however, could not be 
covered on the racer, owing to tarring and other preparation-, 
the entire team ran down to Paris, a distance of rather more than 
100 miles, Strang driving the racer, and the rest of the party 
following on the touring car. The wayside inhabitants are 
familiar with fast racing cars, but the Thomas team attracted 
no small amount of attention, Strang, by reason of his speed and 
roar, and the touring party by reason of speed and the fluttering 
American flags. 

The cylinders had to be dismounted, the bore verified by an 
official of the French Club, and each cylinder stamped in order 
to prevent any changing. Those members of the racing team 
not holding the French driving license were obliged to undergo 
an official test in the streets of Paris. "Monty" Roberts, who 
was one of the unlicensed members, had to undergo the test, much 
to his amusement. After a quarter of an bour in traffic, how- 
ever, the Government inspector was convinced that the pilot of 
the New York-Paris race knew enough about an automobile to 
be given a first class ticket. 

Though competing against specially built racers with a stock 
runabout, practically the same as the 1008 Thomas model, with 
the exception o! a slight increase in bore, Harry 3. Houpt is con- 
vinced that the Thomas car will make an excellent showing on 



miles is what, a prominent, business man traveled with his car 
equipped with the 

SnojpjpHensnKgnnftffliry Spiral! Sjprangs 




He further states that they have 
given him no trouble and have 
saved the Tires, the car in general 
and improved the riding 100 per 
cent. 

We will place a set on your ma- 
chine and if they do not do all 
that we claim for them, we will 
refund you the money. 



Frank O. Renstrom Company 

424-446 Stanyan St., San Francisco. Phone Park 476 




Washington and East Sts. 



Phone Kearny 678 



Ferry Garage Co. 

c/4U Workmanship Guaranteed 



Storage. Renting 



Supplier Machinist 



Installation of 


Magnetos a specialty. 






l_ GEO. H. WOODWARD 




\-.« Automobile 


Machinist 
-— **> PACIFIC 


Fine Repairing 
Machine Work 


^kiMgsr 


s*uA OOJST 

Km ^ AGENTS FOR 
THE 


444-48 FULTON 
St., San Francisco 


TELEPHONE MARKET 16M 


LITTLE 
STEERSMAN 



THE PEER OF ALL! 

PLANET OIL COMPANY'S 

TRANSIT AUTOMOBILE OILS 

BASS-HUETER PAINT CO. 

816 Mission Street Distributors 

ADAPTED TO EVERY MACHINE 

Friction Costs more than Lubrication 



July 11, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



27 



July 7th. In selecting to race under these limitations, Mr. 
Houpt believes that the best possible demonstration will be given 
of the speed, reliability and endurance of the producl of the 
E. R. Thomas Motor Car Company. On straightaway stretches 
the racer has attained a speed of 90 miles an hour, which is suffi- 
cient to prove that it will not he the slowest of the is curs to 
compete for the world's greatest speed trophy. 

* * * 

Mr. Walter C. Morris, representative of the" Autocar Co., has 
secured new quarters at 640 Van Ness avenue, between Golden 
Gate avenue and Turk street, which will be the future salesrooms 
of the Autocar in San Francisco. An excellent repair shop, with 
all modern tools and machinery, is in connection. 

*' * * 

Mr. W. H. Middleton and Mr. J. H. Tucker left last week for 
an extended trip through Northern California and Oregon in an 
Autocar Roadster. 

* * * 

An Autocar Runabout was sold to Mr. II. Van Tiger of Yuba 
City. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Hornby, F. C. Hornby, Miss I. M. Hornby, 
Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Lyons, Miss Lyous and Miss A. P. Batching, 
motored from Redlands in two machines last week to Del Monte, 
and after a short visit, went on to San Francisco with the inten- 
tion of making another visit to Del Monti' on their way back to 
their southern home. 

* * * 

Thomas One Bay vn. Lead. 

America's champion in the New York to Paris race has again 
taken the lead over all competitors, and is now 24 hours ahead 
of the German entry. En the early start from Vladivostok the 
Thomas found more impassable roads — covered by flood — and 
had to return to the Trans-Siberian Railroad tracks. The Pro- 
los again took advantage of this experience — duplicating that of 
the Thomas's going to Alaska — and instead of following the road 
taken by America's champion, it took the lead by using the tracks 
at once. 

Gradually the Thomas has been gaining. Six days' lead of the 



Phone Franklin »qtj 

Up-To-Date Autos 
for hire at all hours 




MAX MAMLOGR 



S70 GOLDEN GATE AVENDE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Protos was steadily cut down until to-day's report shows the 
Thomas to be one day ahead! 

The Thomas caught the German car Monday and passed il 
just outside of Kayinsk. The Protos had been racing all night 
at a good speed, when suddenly the driver saw the Thomas only 
two miles behind. Then began the first real neck-to-neck rate 
of the contest. Lieutenant Koeppen, running on high speed, 
threw open his throttle. Schuster opened his likewise. For fully 
fifteen minutes the two snarling, puffing machines shot through 
the darkness at break-neck speed, and slowly the Thomas began 
to show a visible gain on Germany's champion. 

Finally the American machine poked its nose right up to the 
German's gasoline tank, and Lieutenant Koeppen drew his 
machine aside to give it the road. 

The Thomas made the run from Irkutsk to Omsk in four days 

less time than was required by Prince Borghesc with the Italian 

ear that made the record in the "Pekin to Paris race" last year. 

l,42o miles were covered in nine davs. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph B. Coryell motored to Del Monte from 
their home in Menlo Park on Thursday, and remained over Hie 
Fourth included Mr. and Mrs. (!. C. Pomeroy, Mr. and Mrs. .1. 
Douglas. 




Automobile Excursions ^ ™ 

ROUND TRIP TICKEUuTl Jq §ffl\ Jq$(> 



% 



Leave Garage, San Francisco, 9 a. m. 
Leave Electric Tower, San Jose, 4 p. m. 

ONLY 7-PASSENGER UP-TO-DATE AUTOS USED 



FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS RING UP 




M A M L O C K 




Phone Franklin 2913 
370 Golden Gate Avenue 



.J 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 11. 1908. 



BANKING 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With which are amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia, the Halifax 
Banking Co. and the Merchants' Bank of Prince Edward Island. 
HEAD OFFICE— TORONTO. 

Paid-up Capital $10,000,000 Reserve Fund J6.000.000 

Aggregate Resources, over $113,000,000. 

B E. WALKER, President ALEX. LAIRD. General Manager. 

LONDON OFFICE— 2 Lombard St., E. C. 

NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 

BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlin, Cranbrook. Fernte. 
Greenwood. Kamloops, Ladysmith. Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster. 
Penticton, Prince Rupert, Princeton, Vancouver (3), and Victoria. 

YUKON TERRITORY — Dawson and White Horse. 

UNITED STATES— Portland, Seattle and Skagway (Alaska). 

OTHER BRANCHES — Alberta, 26; Saskatchewan, 18; Manitoba, 20; 
Ontario and Quebec, 62; Maritime Provinces, 19. 

BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England. The Bank of Scot- 
land, Lloyd's Bank, Ltd., The Union of London, and Smith's Bank, Ltd. 

AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The First National Bank. 

AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS— The Commercial National Bank. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Main Office, 326 California St Branch— Cor. Van 
Ness and Eddy. 
A. KAINS, Manager. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Asst, Manager. 

The German Savings & Loan Society 

526 California St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1.000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,453,988.62 

Deposits, June 30, 1908 14.11 

Total Assets 37,065.268.83 

Remittances may be made by draft, post-office, or Wells, Fargo . 
Co.'s money orders, or L.>in by expn ss 

Office Hours— 10 o'clock a. m. to :: o'clock p. m.. except Saturdays In 
12 o'clock M. and Saturday evenings from 7 o'clock p. m. i" 8 o'clock 
p. m. for receipt of deposits only. 

OFFICERS— President, N. Ohlandt; Firs! Vice-Presidejit, Daniel 
Meyer; Second Vice-President. Emii Ruhte; Cashier, A, II. I; Schmidt; 
Assistant Cashier. William Herrmann: Secretary, Georgi Tourny; 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Mu'ler; Goodfellow & Bells, General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS--N. Olilan.u. Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte, 
Ign. Steinhart, I. N. Walter, J. W. Van Bergen, F. Tillinann. Jr.. E. T. 
Kruse and W. S. Goodfellow. 



Qllfi? Jfltmater of Jfamgtt Affatra 



The Anglo-Galifornian Bank, Limited 



Head Office — 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 
Capital Authorized, $6,000,000. Paid-up, $1,600,000 

Subscribed, $3,000,000 Reserve Fund, $700,000 

This bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout 
the world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells ex- 
change and bullion. 
IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LILIENTHAL, Managers. 

J. FRIEDLANDER, Cashier. 



London, Paris and American Bank, Ltd. 



N. W. Cor. Sansome and Suiter Streets. 
Subscribed Capital. $2,600,000. Paid-up Capital, $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $1,200,000. 
Head Office — 40 Threadneedle St., London, E. C. 
AGENTS — New York — Agency of the London, Paris and American 
Bank, Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y. ; Paris — Messrs. Lazard Freres 
& Cie. 17 Boulevard Polssonler. Draw direct on the principal cities of 
the world. Commercial and Travelers' credits issued. 
S. GREENEBAUM, H. FLEISHHACKER, Managers. 

R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 



Mutual Savings Bank ot San Francisco 



Building at 706 Market Street, Opposite Third. 
Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000. Paid-up capital and surplus, $620,000 

James D. Phelan, President; John A. Hooper, First Vice-President; 
James K. Moffltt, Second Vice President; George A. Story, Cashier; C. 
B. Hobson, Assistant Cashier; A. B. Curtis, Second Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan, John A. Hooper, J. K. Moffltt, Frank 
J. Sullivan, Rudolph Spreckels, R. D. McElroy, Charles Holbrook. J. C. 
McKInstry. Rolla V. Watt. 

This bank does a savings business exclusively, paying Interest on all 
deposits. One dollar will open an account, and remittances can be sent 
by Express, Post-Office order or check. Write for particulars. 

Hours — 10 to 3 p. m.; Saturdays, 10 to 12 m.; Saturday evenings, for de- 
posits only, 6:30 to 8 p. m. 



The personnel of the oew Japanese 
Japan's \'i:\\ Cabinet. Cabinet does not mean in diplo- 
matic circles that there will be less 
militarism and more industrialism and more commercialism, as 
Tokio unofficially •puts it. On the contrary, the fact that Prince 

ito was recalled from Seoul and Count Komura from I. Ion 

in advise with the Emperor gives Mule room to doubt that the 
Government intends lo be more aggressive than ever. Count 
K i .i 1 1 1 1 r.i is known to advocate a policy that Btands Eor more 
warships and more soldiers, and that such is to be the policy of 
the new cabinet seems clear enough, else Count Katsura would 
not be asked to act as premier and minister of foreign affaire 
until Komura arrives. Prince lie's career in Korea Mis the 
kind of a man he is. Not only he. but the new members of the 
cabinet advocated a very much more vigorous policy than the om 
adopted by the Government during the trouble glowing out of 
the San Francisco school question. Prince [to is Japan's Bis' 
mai'clc — a man of blood and iron. It was he who formulated and 
successfully consummated the conspiracy to overthrow the Gov- 
ernment of Korea and make that country a dependency of Japan 

It was lie who, a few weeks ago, "persuader china to re v. 

the in-transit lax on Japanese commerce entering Manchuria, 
thus discriminating against the other nations, and it will In 1 re- 
membered that In' advocated the renewal of the Russo-Japanese 
war because Russia refused to pay -$1.0110. nun. duo indemnity. Ii 
is not supposed that he will himself enter the new cabinet. Hi' 
is, in fact, the power behind the Mikado. But it is well known 
that Ito is not anxious for complications with Europe or Amer- 
ica, and that he is an advocate of a larger war establishment fur 
the one purpose of picking a quarrel with China so as to make 
Japan's title to Manchuria clear beyond doubt. The letter of 
the Portsmouth treaty recognizes the sovereignty of China in 
Manchuria outside of the railroad zones, and even in the zones 
neither Japan nor Russia has jurisdiction other than what is 
necessary to administer the concerns of tin- railroads. Even 
Port Arthur is held by Japan under a leasehold that was made 
to Kussia. From all that can be gathered of the new policy of 
Japan, it is to be one of increasing militarism and preparations 

for war with China to completely Bever Manchuria IV Chinese 

ownership. Putting aside the moral aspect of Hie issue, Man- 
churia is as necessary to Japan as the Louisiana purchase was 
to the United States. In fact. Manchuria is the only country 
that is possible of acquirement for the overflow of Japan's in- 
creasing population; besides, without it. Korea would be ex- 
posed to attack by land and by water. If this is to be the policy 
uf Japan's new cabinet, and it is so believed pretty generally in 
diplomatic circles, there will he no occasion for the United 
Stales In apprehend trouble with the Nipponese for some years 
to come at least. But on the other hand, Japan will have to 
reckon with Great Britain in an undertaking of that kind. 
and perhaps with this country as well, for the spoliation of 
Manchuria, or any other attack upon the integrity of the t Ihinese 

Empire would threaten Anglo-Saxon commerce, present and 
prospective, in the Far East, to say nothing of adding a solid 
body of 390,000 square miles of agricultural lands, coal mines 
and forests to the Japanese Empire. 



Central Trust Company of California 

42 Montgomery St. Branches: 3039 16th St.; 624 Van Ness Avenue. 

Accounts of Individuals, Firms, Corporations, Unions, Societies 
solicited. Interest paid on Savings Accounts. Drafts sold on all 
parts of the world. 

Capital paid in. Jl, 600, 000 Resources, $5, 026. 939. 09 

B. G. TOGNAZZI. Manager. 



The \i:u; East. 



IT IS IGNORANCE THAT WASTES 
EFFORT." TRAINED SERVANTS USE 

SAPOLIO 



Everything in the Near East is 
quiet, but perhaps dangerously 30. 
Russia is gradually increasing her 
army on the border of Asia Minor, and ready to march into 

Persia or invade Turkey in Asia, and seemingly England is well- 
satisfied to have things as they are. for Kussia caii be relied upon 
to see to ii thai Germany dors not accept the Shah's invitation 
in come to bis relief. There is a suspicion in diplomatic cir- 
cles that if the shah cannot give Persia a substantial Govern- 
ment that CO lercc may have less danger and fewer obstruc- 
tions. Russia, under an agreement with England and France, 
may assume fl sort of suzerainty over Persia unlil the several 
factions can agree upon a stable form of Government, but it is 
conceded that the masses will not agree to anything short of a 
Constitutional Government, with an elective parliament. The 

Shah agreed to as much a var ago. bin later he tried to annul 
his action. 






.In.v I I. 1908. 



AND CALIFOBNIA ADVERTISER. 



3:) 



l\ British I mm \. 



Wreak trouble faces England in 
British India. Verj pronounced 
revolutionary tendencies have been 
discovered in several districts, and drastic measures are being 
inaugurated to suppress them, Quite recently bomb throwing 
iiikI other outrages have been committed, and prompl action 
has been taken to put ;i stop to political agitation. II was found 
that for a long time, anarchists have been circulating literature 
.•mil organizing societies. The reports do not state how anar- 
chists found a lodgment in the country, but the reports do say 
that the dissemination of such literature or the advocacy of an- 
archistic sentiments is counted a crime whose punishment is 
penal servitude for life. The same punishment is meted out to 
those who manufacture bombs or are found to be in possession 
of them, or in any way identified with either nihilism or anarch- 
ism. Tl is believed, however, that the natives are not going to 
submit without a struggle, though no doubt it will be short- 
lived. The presumption is. that the ring-leaders are Hindoos 
who have traveled in Europe, where they became imbued with 
anarchistic sentiments and returned to their own country to 
spread the gospel of hatred and murder. 



In Morocco. 



Morocco has a real civil war on ils 
hands. Mulai llalid, the pretender, 
is gaining ground everywhere, and 
several regiments thai have hitherto been loyal to Abd-'el-Aziz, 
the legitimate Sultan, have gone over to Mulai. The pretender 
gives it out that he has the sympathy and good will of Germany, 
and thai Germany agrees with him that he is the only man the 
powers can rely upon to respect treaties and preserve order. A 
crisis came a few days ago, when an attempt was made in several 
mosques to substitute the name of the pretender for that of 
Abd-el-Aziz in the official prayers, bui Mulai's friends lost out, 
and Aziz is still the representative of Allah in Northern 
Morocco. Meanwhile the Paris Government is watching German 
intrigue with Mulai, and also getting Prance into a better state 
of preparedness for war than ever before in the nation's history. 



A French column raided one of 
Or QliNERjVTj [NTEREBT. Mulai fTalid's camps some days 

ago. and captured a lol of private 

correspondence and secret proclamations. One of the proclama- 
tions concluded this way: "Lei us drive oul the vile foreigners 
after first throwing the French into the sea." —The Russian 
Donma has declared by resolution thai every one of the dozen 

or more Grand Dukes, except Yladinar. mn-i forthwith be 

eliminated from anj and all kinds of public service and 

Irusi and occupation, and Hie Czar is afraid i 
the required ukase. The German newspapers are furious he- 
cause a British squadron of warships maneuvered for 
hours in the North Sea. Thej insisl thai it was done to intimi- 
date the Kaiser. Maneuvering for a real purpose would nol 
surprise the world. President Castrn insists Ihat the \ 

can Asphalt Trusl fork over $5,000,000, the coal to Venezuela 

to put down the rebellion the tru I started. The award of dam- 
ages has been fixed bi the Venezuelan Courl of Appeals, and 
the Hague Congress has dec ded thai tin re is no appeal fro 
decision. 



THE R WE /'/.MCA'. 
The battle agninsl race-track gambling is part of thai long 
campaign, the result of which is that gambling hells like 

a! Monte Carlo am. lotteries ha the common peo- 

ple, like that formerly maintained at New Orleans, have been 
made first disreputable, then abolished. There is only o» 
ment adduced in favor of race-track gambling, namely, that '; 

improves the breed of horses, 'flic ai>- 

i riorates the breed of men. — / 



In closing up the house for the summer, it is glwa; 

lo it that the rugs and ear] horoughly cleaned and 

thus avoid the ravages of the moths. Then on returning the 
carpets need but little sweeping, and the rugs mav be immedi- 
ately laid. It is always the prudent housewife who ma 
husband contented, and a (lean hous 
man. T:\ the Spaul 

Gate Avenue. They are noted for their efficient servi 
promp 



Charles Lyons 

LONDON TAILOR 

ESTABLISHED (to YEARS 

Importer and Dealer in Foreign and Domestic Woolens 

Suits to order from $25.00 up 

Overcoats $25.00 " 

Trousers " " " $ 6.00 " 

1432 Fillmore St, 731 Van Ness Ave., 771 Market St, San Francisco 
958 Broadway, Oakland 



NATIONAL BREWING CO. 

TELEPHONE PARK 33 

"The Beer that Stands the Test" 

Orders for Shipping Filled on Short Notice. 

Office, end Brewer;: CORNER FULTON AND WEBSTER STREETS 



White Diamond Water Go, 



PCRE WATER FOR OAKLAND 
ALAMEDA 

i Incorporated > BERKELEY 

An Absolutely Sanitary Water, neither Boiled. Distilled nor Chemically Treated, 
but Bacteriologically Purified by Electrical Process, scallons DELIVERED FRESH 
EACH WEEK, $1.50 per mo. Single 5 cation bottle. 50c. 

("HONES: PIEDMONT t7ao AND HOME A 4192 

NO. 1 TELEGRAPH AVE. OAKLAND. CAl. 




H. Bette 

1 163 ELLIS STREET, S. F. 

Formerly 424 Sutter Street. 



Importer tf Fine Novelties, oTWaker of Ladies' 
Tailored Suits, Riding Habits a Specialty*. 



Jefferson Square Bowling Alleys 
and Billiard and Pool Parlors 

,•, GOLDEN GATE AVE. CORNER OCTAV IA 

LARGEST AND FINEST IN THE WORLD 



MURPHY GRANT & CO. 

Wholesale Dry Goods 

N. E. Cor. Market and Sansome St8.. San Francisco. Cal. 
New -tantly am' 

quarl 

We will occupy our : N. E. Cor. Sansome and Bush 

streets, about July 15th. 



USE MAYERLES EYEWATER 

for one day and notice the wonderful effect* 

Bft anj Hfj ■ bfl the 

ems; Per 
Jo/en, ? 

ej when glasses blur. 
( ent». 

r '!.• IT. S 
■H.IM Dim 4rt »..**» ■*- -*rtel T179 




■ 



mmi «tr*r.ctk*e Um ifM »o i p > — r ' ■ 



30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July II, L908. 



UBGAI^agteTABLE 




"She (Diana) came of the class that breeds revolutionist* 
the class that knowing itself gentle by birth and education, finds 
itself lacking in the means to maintain the one and gratify the 
other and realizes, as perhaps no other class can do. the sheer 
brute power of money." "I sometimes feel— I feel to-night"— 
Diana says — "as if I would give my immortal soul to live, just 
live — for a week." 

One loves Diana because she has the courage to do what she 

si wants to do, and to follow the foolishly delightful path we 

all want to walk — and don't dare. Diana is pretty and clever 
and wildly rebellious over the grayness and narrowness of the life 
of a London shop-girl. Then most unexpectedly, she inherits 
three hundred pounds. Instead of safely anil sandy investing 
her tiny fortune, she decides to blow it all in on a month of 
glorious fun. She has Ihe fun — Paris gowns, a trip In Switzer- 
land, two love affairs, and a grand, good time until her last 








cr 




"Diana of Dobson's." 

pound goes. Thru, in ruing her back on both her lovers, she re- 
turns In London, penniless, to hunt a new job. How she doesn't 
find work, and how the right man finds her, gives a delightful 
ending to an absorbing tale, which, though light in touch, is 
deeply significant. "Diana of Dobson's" is a romance of much 
charm, much interest and great originality. 

"And so, in the wind of Ihe morning, they began life together. 
The world had need of neither of llicni. but they had need of 
each other." The author is Cecily Hamilton. Century Co. 



The California Hoard of Trade has just issued a booklet en- 
titled. "California, Resources and Possibilities." The cover is 
in blue and yellow. 11 is a splendid compilation, and all that 
its name implies. 



BUGGY FOR SALE. 



In Alameda. A good business buggy ; has been used only a few 
times. Cost $150 ; will be sold for $95. Apply Central Stables, 
Sherman street, near Encinal avenue, Alameda. 



ENNEIN'S 



BORATED 
TALCUM 




" feoWDER 



PRICKLY H£AT, 
CHAFING, and 
SUNBURN, S , rifftSI uo ~" 

4 littlt higher In pn'.e, etrhipj, Ihtn UKWrWrn sabitl- 
ti, but t rrnon for it. ' Remove* ill odor of pertpl- 
Dcllghtful after Shivlng. Soldcvcrywhirc.oriTulIcd 
receipt oF 25c. Cci Menrten't Hhe original], SimpU Ftt. 
GERHARD MENNEN CO., N t w*.k. N. J. 



The Entertaining of Guests 

IS NEVER A PROBLEM WHERE 
THERE IS AN AUTOPIANO 

Music is common ground on which all can meet. 

Different persons may have different tastes in music, but there is 
certain to be some kind of music which each thoroughly enjoys. 

The Autopiano is the ideal musical instrument— perfect as a piano for 
manual playing and perfect as a player piano. 

There are no tastes so undeveloped, and no tastes so advanced, but 
this wonderful Instrument can gratify them. Guests can always be 
successfully entertained with the Autopiano. 

Even though they 
are themselves own- 
ers of the instrument, 
they will be sure of 
finding among your 
rolls some that are 
unfamiliar and which 
they will enjoy hear- 
ing played. 

The more the Auto- 
piano is played the 
more fascinating it 
becomes. It contin- 
ually leads you into 
making new musical 
discoveries. 

The pleasure derived from music is many times increased when you 
are able to do the actual playing yourself. 

The Autopiano is sold at a price that is ordinarily asked for a piano 
alone of equal grade. 

We'll accept your present piano as part payment toward the Auto- 
piano. 
Sold on easy monthly payments. 

The Genuine Soloist, Autopiano sold only by 




Eilers Music Company 



975 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO 
1220 Fillmore St., S. F. 1075 Clay St., 

STORES EVERYWHERE 



Oakland 



For Sale 



A BARGAIN 



$300 



Automatic Addressing Machine,COST$350.00 
Remington No. 6 - "115.00 

5000 Stencils - 7.50 

Sundries - - - " - 50.00 



$522.50 



If interested see Manager, Room 16, 773 Market Street, San Francisco 






July 11, 1908. AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 31 



NINETY-SECOND HALF-YEARLY REPORT 

OF THE 

San Francisco Savings Union 

NORTHWEST CORNER CALIFORNIA AND MONTGOMERY STREETS 

Sworn Statement of the Condition and Value of the Assets and Liabilities 

AT THE CLOSE OF BUSINESS 

JUNE 30, 1908 

ASSETS. 

Loans secured by first lien on real estate wholly 

within the State of California ,$14,334,938.9( 

Loans secured by pledge anil hypothecation of 

approved bonds and stocks 1,218,974.40 

Lends of the municipalities and school dis- 
tricts of the Slate of California, railroad 
bonds and bonds ami Btocks of local corpora- 
tions, the value of which is 9,458,019.95 

Bank Premises L50,000.00 

Other Real Estate in the State of California 581,696.09 

Furniture and Fixtures 2,000.00 

Cash in Vanli and in Bank 1,769,220.66 

Total Assets $27,508,850.07 

LIABILITIES. 

Due Depositors $25,321,986.66 

Capital Paid dp 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Coi genl Funds 1,183,632.43 

General Tax Account, Balance Undisbursed .... 3,230.98 

Total Liabilities $27,508,850.01 



San Francisco, July l. 1908. 

(Signed) E. B. POND, President. 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

State of California. City and County of San Frani 

We do solemnly swear thai we have (and each <>f us hi 
personal knowled matters contained in the foregoing 

report, and that ever) allejri u statement, mailer ami thing 

therein contained is true, to the besl of our knowledge and be- 
lief. 

jned) E. B. POND. 

(Signed) LOVELL WHITE. 

iscribed aiv! before me. this 1st day of July, 1908. 

- jned) FRANK I.. OWEN, Notary Public. 

iry Public in and for the City and Conn- - Kran- 

l alifornia. 



Kor the half year ending .Inn- 10, 1908, a dn dend i • 
declared at the rates per annum •: four ami one-quarter i C , i 

or < i ) per cent on ordinary 
taxes, payab! >n ami after Wedm 

[raw their dividends at any 
tj me durinj v dividend not drawn 

w j|l 1„ -hereof, and 

lividend from July 1- Money di • 
comm »rn dividend 



33 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 11, 1908. 




m 



THE REASON. 

Oh, hark the pulses of the night, 

The crickets hidden in the held. 
That beat out music of delighl 

Till summoned dawn stands half-revealed! 

Oh, mark above the bearded corn 

And the green wheat and bending rye. 

Tuned to the earth and calling dawn. 
The stars vibrating in the sky! 

And know, divided soul of me, 

Here in the meadow, sweet in speech, 

This perfect night could never be 
Were we not mated each to each. 

— James Oppenheiw in Metropolitan. 

A PREFACE. 

If four blank walls be mine, and every wind 
That goes careening through the vasts of sky 
Makes free with my shrunk casement, and my 
Shows but a feeble flame, and the bare floor 
Has but the dust for carpet, am I poor? 
Nay, T am very Croesus! that — and more! 
For no swart" Mede can rob me of my dreams 
Wherewith I hang a rapt Madonna there — 
A face Murillo painted — drape rich folds 
Of gold-shot damask round yon oriel. 
And heap about me rugs of velvet pile 
Deft-wrought upon the looms of Kennanshah ! 
Poor! Ts he poor who has God's gift of dreams? 
— Clinton Scollard. From "Blank Verse Pastels. 



heartl 



A REMNANT REMAINETH. 

TO A. It. C. 

Amid this clamor of the silly throng 

Who boast that they have wrought true counterpart 
Of Nature's face — ah. me. they miss her heart ! 

Who scoff at them that for God's music long 

And for the love of beauty Buffer wrong. 
Who would turn Helicon into a mart 
And smite with Cromwell-stroke the throai of Arl 
And slay with .ludas-kiss the lips of Song, 

My hear) leaps up when [ behold afar 

A new hand stretched t<> take the torch of Truth, 
Which seer and saint pass down from age to youth 
To lighl tin' future Temple's inner shrines. 

Across the dusk I see and name a star; 

Pray God thai Phosphor and aoi Eesper shines. 

— Richard Hvvey. 



I'll)' 1. 1. is l.\7> CORYDON. 
Phyllis took a red rose from the tangles of her hair — 
Time, the Golden Age; the place, Arcadia, anywhere — 

Phyllis laughed, the Bauey jade: "Sir Shepherd, will have thia 
Or" — bashful god of skipping lambs and. oaten reeds! — "a kiss?" 

Bethink thee, gentle Corydon! A rose lasts all nigh! long, 
A kiss but Blips from off your lips like a thrush's evening song. 
A kiss thai goes, where no one knows! A rose, a crimson rose! 
Corydon made his ehoice and took — Well, which do you suppose! 
— Arthur Cotton in "Harps Hung Up in Rdbylon." 



The Home Insurance Go, 



New York 



Organized 1853. Cash Capital, (3.000,000 

Insurance on Personal effects of tourists and temporary sojourners 

anywhere In United States, Canada and Mexico. Insurance against loss 

by Are, lightning, wind storm or tornado. Indemnity for loss of rental 

Income by fire or lightning. 

H. L. ROFP, General Agent. J. J. SHEAHAN, Ass't General 
38 Sutter St., San Francisco, Cal. 



FIRE MARINE AUTOMOBILE 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 



CAPITAL, $1,600,000 



ASSETS, $6,000,000 



CALIFORNIA AND SANSOME STREETS 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Cash Capital, (200,000. 



Cash Assets, 8t81,J77.i» 



Pacific Coast Gasualty Co. 

OP CALIFORNIA. 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, Elevators, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Burglary, Plate Glass Insurance. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; John C. Coleman, Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; F. P. Deerlng, 
Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, H. E. Bothln, Edward L. Brayion, John C. Cole- 
man, F. P. Deerlng, E. F. Green, James K. Moffltt. Henry Rosenfeld, 
Adolph A. Son, William S. Tevls. 

Head Office — Merchants Exchange Building, San Francisco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company, General Agents for California, Kohl Building, San 
Francisco. 

The Connecticut Fire Insurance Co. 

Of Hartford. Established 18E0. 

Capital 11,000.000.00 

Total Assets 6.721,433.01 

Surplus to Policyholders 2,282,181.00 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL BUILDING 
BENJAMIN J. 8MITH, MANAGER. 



British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co., Ltd. 

Of Liverpool. 



Capital 



.$1,700,000 



Agent. 



BALFOUR, GUTHRIE A CO., Agar**. 
j*o SANSOME STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hlbernia Savings and Loan Society. 

At a meeting of the Board of Directors of this society, held this day. 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum 
on all deposits for the six months ending Juno 30. inns, free from all 
taxes, and payable on ami after July i. 1908. Dividends not drawn will 

be added to depositors' accounts and become a part tin- roof, and will 
earn dividend from Julv 1, 190*. Deposits made mi or In -fore Julv Hi. 
1908. will draw interest from July 1. 1908. 

R. M. TOBIN. Seoretary. 
Offiee — Corner Market, McAllister and Jones Streets, San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Central Trust Company of California. 
For the half year ending Juno 30. 1908. a dividend has been declared on 
all deposits In the savings department of this bank, 'it the rate of four (4) 
per eont per annum, payable on and after Wednesday, July l. L908. Divi- 
dends not called for are added to and bear the same rate of Interest as 
the principal from July 1, 1908. 

B. G. TOGNAZZI, Manager 
Office — 42 Montgomery street, corner Sutter, San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending June 30, 1908. a dividend has boon declared at 
the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Wednesday, July 1. 1908. Dividends not called for 
are added to and bear the same rate of interest as the principal from 
July 1. 1903. GEORGE TOURNY. Secretary. 

Office — 526 California street. San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending June 3. 1908, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of 4 per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, payable 
on and after Wednesday. Julv 1. 1908. Dividends not called for are added 
to and bear the same rate of Interest as the principal from July 1, 1908. 

WM. A. BOSTON, Cashier. 
Office — 101 Montgomery street, corner Sutter street, San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Continental Building and Loan Association. 
Will, on July 1. 1908, pay the usual Interest "I" 6 per cent per annum on 
term deposits or class "C" stock, 4 per cent per annum on ordinary or 
class "D" stock. The Interest on ordinary deposits, if not withdrawn, will 
be added to the principal and thereafter draw inten-sl ;it tlir- same rate. 

WASHINGTON DODGE. President, WII.DTAM CORBIN. Secretary. 

Office — Market and Church Sts.. San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending Juno 30. 1908, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes. 
payable on and after Wednesday. July 1. 1908. Dividends not railed for 
are added to and bear the same rate of interest as the principal from 
Julv 1. 1908. Money deposited on or before Julv 10th will draw interest 
from July 1, 1908. GEORGE A. STORY, Cashier. 

Office — 706 Market street, opposite Third, San Francisco. 



July ll. 1908. 



AND CAMFOBNIA ADVERTISER. 



An Jtotagtttanj UlnteruiPiu Uttli a (Srrat Ulan 

Willi becoming nervousness, 1 made my way into the rlosulv- 
i led sanctum of Chief Biggy, after a heated tilt and wordy 
interchange with the brace of buxom guardians who scan with 
eagle eye all prying persons who seek to peep into the throne- 
on of the mighty eop, popularly hailed as the "Chief. '" I was 
compelled to assume my most unpretentious and subdued de- 
meanor before 1 could prevail upon the worthy sentinels to per- 
mit me to invade the office where Biggy shapes the destiny of 
San Francisco's police; and then, only after I had represented to 
them that my uncle Jim had gone to school with Biggy in the 
glad days of childhood, and that the chief would recognize me 
the instant his eyes fell upon my sanctimonious physiognomy. 

"How are you. Chief?" I saluted, as with conscious apprecia- 
tion of the greatness before me 1 proceeded to seat myself by his 
side. 

My auditor gazed at me with ill-feigned suspicion, and thrust 
Ins right hand caressingly over his hip-pocket, as though to re- 
assure himself that his armament was within reach should his 
hold visitor develop any untoward symptoms. Then he replied: 
"I'm all right, sonny; but I've no time for quibble. If you've 
got any business with me spit it out : rustle : I'm due at a meet- 
inn mI the 'Old Maids' Reform Society." where I'm slated to de- 
liver a speech on the 'Utility of Marriage as a Trip to Happi- 
ness." and later I have an appointment with my tailor who i.s 
fitting a nobby serge for me for week-day wear. 

"Now, what do you want? Have you come to register a com- 
plaint against some fresh cop ; or have you lost an umbrella or a 
hat cord? Most of the people who come here to consult me on 
matters of vital importance usually boil their business down to 
a lost poodle or a missing collar-bag." 

"Well, Chief," I at length found courage to remark, "I have 
come mi behalf of the editor of the News Letter to ask you a 
question or two concerning the reports that are flooding into 
linn concerning the wide-open pool-rooms that dot San Francisco 
from one end to the other. Do you know anything of the pool- 
rooms ?" 

"Pool-rooms, billiard'halls ? Why, my boy they are all licensed 
sn far as we know; and where we discover one in operation with- 
out the proper certificate, we shut it down without a moment's 
delay. Sometimes it is observed that a pool-room or billiard 
li.ill is used as the rendezvous of cigarette-smoking youths: 
when this is >n. the proprietor is cautioned to exclude all males 
under the age of eighteen; if lie disobeys our mandate, his place 
is promptly rinsed. 1 think your editor is at sea." 

"But, Chief," I interrupted, "the poo] rooms I refer to are 
those in which books are made on the races — horse races." 

"What am you trying I" smother me with, young fellow? Do 
Mm mean to say that pool-roomB are running in this city — San 
Francisco — to-day?" With this innocenl interrogation, the Chief 

Wagged his head and sat thi 1 at me. chewing the cud of 

thought. 

Then, withoul warning. In bulged 

from the side ol his desk, pressed it. and in rushed two stalwart 
policemen. 

"Flag this gazaboo to the ietii ind summon the u 

from the Emergencj Bospital. He's Buffering from an 
vated ca i delirium tremens. Ee shot a bunch oi 

me m the effed thai pool-rooms are running in San Francisco. 
Take him away; the sight of him makes my stomach sick." 
1 Lingered in the C8gi ouple of hours, when my editor. 

og that 1 had met with foul play, got after the U 
• a search «.\ I was reluctantli ran m\ 

. iiv by a burly Celtic cop. 
From what I can as, nil in. Chi know thai 

ml rooms are running: but it is rumored that he is going 
to make an investigation in person as soon as the tailor finishes 
his nobby serge. '1'he [ntervibwkb. 



The new .Japanese room- (Marsh's) with rare, high Jap- 
art exhibit, are now open in v nt Hotel. 



St*. Sauveur Apartments 

lJ7d JONBS, S. F..COR. CLAY STREET.Marine view, 
4 and S room flats. Every convenience. 
WOLF & HOLLMAN. Agents. 327 Kearny St. 



Fairmont* 
Hotel 

Superbly situated. 
Magnificently appointed. 
Perfectly served. 

In every aspect approaching nearest to the IDEAL 
hotel. Managed by the world famous 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 



The restriction of the Fourth of duly fireworks in San 

Francisco has resulted in a diminution of doctors' hills and death 
certificates. 



DON'T FORGET IT! 

Cafe Madden 

236-340 Turk Street., San Francisco 

Madden's will be the most beautiful dining place ever 
seen in the West. It will seat one thousand people, 
and embody all the latest features in decorative and 
culinary art. 

NOW OPEN 

Under the Management of JOHN A. MADDEN 
Formerly with the Palace and St. Francis Hotels 




[New 

Poodle 

Dog 

Restaurant 

and 

O 1 N. W. Corn.r 

notel Polk 8 Post St.. 

Phone Sib FmdcIico 

FnnLIln 2960 



Thompson's 
Annex 



40c 



SERVE AN 

IDEAL 
LUNCHEON 
O'Farrell near Fillmore 



JULES 



■ OPEN EVENINCS. INCLUDING SUNDAYS 

MUSIC SUNDAYS 

RESTAURANT 

•C 326 BUSH STREET, Bet.. Kearny and Montgomery Stt. 

PHONI KSARTT HI] 

DINNER. SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS 
DINNER. With wioe. 75c With wioe. $1 00 



Old Poodle Dog Restaurant 

824*626 Eddy St.. near Van New Ave- Formerly at »u«h fjt., 
cor. Grant Avenue- Phone Franklin 63. 



34 



SAN FKANCJSCO NEWS LJbTiTEK 



July 11. 1908. 




Close to all Railway and Steamship Offices. 150 Rooms— 100 with Private Bath 

A New Class A absolutely Fireproof Building, with every modern 

convenience. Steam Heat and Telephone In every room. 

The Hotel Holland 

EUROPEAN PLAN 

A Strictly First Class Family Hotel 

Ellis street, between Powell and Mason, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



E. L. YOUNG, Manager 



Telephone Temporary 4380 



JULY 

THE MATCHLESS MONTH AT 

Hotel Del Monte 

Golf, Motoring, Sailing, Fishing, Bathing, 
Riding. Low Hotel rates S3 to $5.50 
per day American plan. Make your res- 
ervations NOW. 

H. R. WARNER, 

Manager Del Monte 

or 789 Market Street, San Francisco. 



Hotel Kowardennan 



Now Open. For further informa- 
tion see Peck-Judah Information 
Bureau, 789 Market St., or write 

B. DICKINSON, Prop., 
Ben Lomond, Cal. 



Hotel Westminster 



Los Angeles, Cal. 

Fourth and Main Sts. 



American Plan 

REOPENED 

Rates Per Day, $2.50 Rooms without Bath 
Rooms with Bath $3.00, $3.50 and $4.00 

European Plan 

$1.00 per day and up 
With bath $1.50 an up 

F. O. JOHNSON, Proprietor 



Hotel St. James 



OPPOSITE ST. JAMES PARK 

SAN JOSE 

Recognized headquarters for automobile parties. 

ALBERT BETTENS. Prop. R. M. BETTENS, M,r. 



GILROY HOT SPRINGS 

OPEN THE YEAR ROUND. 

ACCESSIBILITY. — The keynote to our success. Only 4 hours 
from San Francisco, Including delightful stage ride over the best 
kept mountain road in California. Unsurpassed table, superb ser- 
vice, health-healing waters, telephone, post-office, ideal climate. 

The waters contain sulphur, alum, iron, soda, magnesia, iodine 
and traces of arsenic, and are very efficacious in cures of rheuma- 
tism, neuralgia, rheumatic gout, kidney and liver diseases, lead 
and mercurial poisoning, and all bladder and urinary complaints. 
Hunting and trout fishing. Rates $12 to $17.50 a week; baths free. 
Trains leave Third and Townsend streets at 9 a. m. Direct stage 
connection. Send for booklet or see Peck-Judah, 789 Market St. 

W. J. McDONALD, Proprietor. 



spend your pj zmo Beach TheFinestBeach 



SUMMER AT 



on the Coast 



"NOT AN IDLE MINUTE." 
Hold your conventions and club outings at Pizmo! 
You can live at the Inn for $2.50 per day. Special weekly and 
monthly rates. 
Elegantly furnished Tents in Tent-city for $6.00 per week for two. 

Fishing, Boating, Bathing, Autolng, Bowling, Tennis, Horseback 
Riding through the mountains; Clam Digging. 

Two large bathing pavilions, with warm plunge. 

The beach at Pizmo is one-quarter of a mile wide, and seventeen 
miles long. And is noted among the autolsts as the Ormond of thu 
West. 

Ask any Southern Pacific agent about summer excursion rates, 
or write Pizmo Beach Resort, 789 Market street. 



SANTA CRUZ 



THE WORLD'S MOST BEAUTIFUL PLAYGROUND 



ELECTRIC ILLUMINATIONS, THE FAMOUS CASINO GRILL, FIREWORKS 
from the Big Ship BALBOA. 

Two Big Famous Brass Bands, Orchestras, Etc. The Famous Big 
Trees, Scenic Mountains. 

Largest and most magnificent Casino and Natatorium. Climate with- 
out an Equal. 



NEVER A DULL MOMENT FROM JUNE 20th 
TO OCTOBER 1st, 



Lake County, 

California 



Anderson Springs 

The greatest resort for health and pleasure; the only natural 
mineral steam baths In Lake County. Natural Hot Sulphur and 
Iron Baths. Board — $10 to $14 per week. No extra charge for 
baths. How to reach the Springs — Take Oakland ferry at 7:30 
a. m., or Steamer Muntluello, anj .Napa Valley Kiectilc it. K. iu 
St. Helena, auto stage io springs, tare $t>.55, arrive 12.30 for lunch, 
or S. P. train to Callstoga, ariive 11.30 for lunch; Spiers stage to 
epniigs; tare $t>.&0; arrive at An-lerson Springs at 4 p. m., distance 
21 miles. Kaie, $7 round trip from San .-"rancisco. Address all 
« ommunicaiioJis to J. ANDERSON, Anderson Springs, Middletown. 
Lake County, Cal. 



Klamath Hot Springs 

In the mountains of Northern California, is noted for Its fine cli- 
mate, fishing, hunting and mineral waters. Apply to Peck-Judah 
Co.. 739 Market street, San Francisco, or to Edson Bros., Bes- 
wick, Siskiyou County. Cal. 



Mt. Tamalpais «-<- Muir Woods 

TWO TRIPS, entirely different. To the summit of a high mountain; 
to the heart of a great forest. Trees 18 feet in diameter, 200 feet high. 

"TAVBRN OF TAMALPAIS" and "Mair Tmra" 

At the Summit In the Woods 

Via Sausalito Ferry, foot of Market Street. See San Francisco dally papers for 
Time Card. 




*a« 'MS* 1 *** 




(&%lifttvvtm%bbtxtxzzx~ 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 
The News Letter Is a member California Periodical Publishers' Association. 



VOL. LXXVI 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 18, 1908 



No. 3 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 773 Market St., San Francisco. Cal. Tel. Temporary 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal , Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may he obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London office — 30 CornhiH, E, C. England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining:, commercial and financial 

news notes, advertise nts or other matter intended for publication in 

I ■unvnt number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 



The rare track must go. 

Where is the lost Tom Watson? 

For a Presidential year, the limes tire g 1. 

Why didn't they nominate Tillman for vice-President ? 

Hearst repudiating Bryan is the pot calling the kettle 

I, lack. 

The anti-race track sentiment is growing all over the 

country. 

It's about lime for Mi'. Brisbane to write something real 

virile Tor Mi'. Hearst to say. 

Bryan is not worrying over the past. Tl's the present that 

disturbs him, and the future is fearful. 

The difference between Bryan and Taft is thai Tall is 

big all over, and Bryan is only big in spots. 

The ne\l Republican' Convention will he held in San 

Francisco. Westward the Star of Empire, etc. 

Hope heads the Prohibition party! We trust thai tie 

will not make the aqueous party ill with cardiac difficulty. 

It is impossible to nominate a Democratic ticket ami not 

gel whiskers mixed up in it somewhere. Kern furnished the 
mat. 

"The most enjoyable thing about a vacation is the plan- 
ning thereof," said the man who picked a wood-tick out of his 
lefl ear. 

— —Mrs. Pearj says thai she wishes "the Lord had never made 
the North Pole." There are others wishing the same thin-, bul 
not for tin' sawi re i on 

Mr. Taft has gone to the Southern Hoi Springs For Hie 

purpose of training before giving the gentleman from Nebraska 
the run of his life for ids money. 

Biggy, "hen you gel that ink slinger, turn him over to 

the ladies, and li ISC the punishment. The fellow is a 

mil. bul such nuts need cracking ! 

\ gentli nan bit a lady on the head with a soup ladle. 

and the judge granted the divorce. This is equity. The lady 
gol the ladle, the gentleman the soup. 

■ The nations thai an worrying about the purcha- 

Inaughts, need worry no longer. Brazil is 
afraid thai Rool will make them anotheT visit. 

There is one remarkable thing aboul the removal 

.lames Hamilton l.e» hal we cannol understand. 

We wonder how it is possible for Seattle to survive. 

Richmond Pearson Hobson is* disappointed. Hi 

mvince bis ic friends of the fact that the Japan- 
are aboul to wipe the P» off the map! 
Both conventions came ven near advocating 

amendment to provide for nine-foot sheets at hot 

pillows in sleeping 



These be national issue- 



The women who wear the Direeloire are the ones who 

formerly owned poodle dogs and hired husbands as chaperons 
for the dogs. Now the man will have to act as a shield for the 
wife's [eft hind leg. 

The jail bird the socialists were trying to nominate Eor 

President had the decency to refuse to do the bidding id' his 
party, which is the best evidence that he ought to lie oul of 
jail and the party in. 

The man who is nol in politics to-day in Ibis country, the 

man who is not in politics as a conviction thai he is right in do- 
ing polities, studying politics, and talking politics is not a good 
citizen. See that you are registered ! 

ft is not every young degenerate nincompoop of a mil- 
lionaire thai can own a party of his own. Hearst is a lucky kid. 
•He can play with toys that are denied to others of the feeble 
minded. He has the Dependent League. 

Now that the De Sagane are united with the sanction of 

a civil marriage ceremony to cover up the pre-nuptial travels 
with the cloak of decency, lei us hope that they will quickly sink 
out of sight, and let little Honi have the stage to himself. 

Mr. Kern, id' Indiana, the great Demoi ralic mystery, is a 

mystery no longer. He is the guardian of the interests of Tom 
Taggart, the owner of the Indiana Monte Carlo. This is one 
W8J of asking the American people to pay off your legal obliga- 

I loll-. 

The reform administration of San Francisco seems to 

think that the ('baiter is a most flexible instrument, and it is 
bent on stretching it in tlie breaking point. Give an enthusiastic 
man an automobile, and he'll run it into the ditch. The charter 
is like a careful chauffeur — the kind you don't like. 

The East is being grilled by the sun when it is not being 

strewn over the landscape by tornadoes or washed away by Hoods! 
New York and Chicago ha a few days thai 

beats thai of a year of the tire, eartbouake and pest in San I'ran- 
cisco. It's a most delightful climate they have over the Big 
Divide, "for them as likes it." 

Mr. Bryan's speech a- to the position of the Southern 

Democrat is nol having a g I effect in the Mew England Stales. 

Mr. Bryan should be more careful in letting the public know 

that "the white man is giving the black man belter laws than the 

man would give the white man if be were In power." 

Which is undoubtedly true, hut unpalatable to the gentlemen 
and ladies of the negro lming coterie of Boston and then 

Everything that Alton It. Parker mixes up in seems to 

be frost-bitten. He butted into the Denver convention, with a 
resolution, ami then the convention nominated Bryan. Whenever 

n Democrats have bad a chance to do something - 

comes fate and knocks the pins out. It is BUSpected that 
Parker was opposed to Kern, and thus is the Democracy saddled 
with two big burdens. Bryan and Kern — it sounds like 
for a saloon in Bed I 

A St. Paul inventor says that he has beaten 

to Binders with a new kind of boat that will taki 

Father of Waters at the rate of sixty miles an hour. I. I! 

Now. let's establish a line of these pack 

Honduras and ship away Ruef, Spreckela, 3 

his Doodling friends, the - ngdon 

and a few others. Let it be known that the United - 

declare an unrelenting war if the little republic allows any of 

the consignment of undesirables to return. 




7 Examiner Tries to Find the Dynamiter Sutter Street Franchise Matters « 

Automobile Laws 



m 



At this writing there seems some 
The Fuhlic Wills It. prospect that the Supervisors will 

recede from the untenable position 
they have assumed in refusing to permit the Sutter Street Bail- 
way Coinpam to use electric instead of horse cars on lower 
Market street. After last Monday's session of the Board, there 
can be no doubt what the popular will is in Ibis regard, or where 
the public interest lies. Petitions representing fourteen banks 
and over three thousand citizens favored the restoration of the 
permit, and representatives from the Board of Trade, the Mer- 
chants' Association, the Chamber of Commerce, the Civic 
League and a number of improvement associations addressed 
the Supervisors on behalf of the petitioners. The sole outspoken 
dissenting voice, as far as the public was concerned, came from 
the San Francisco Labor Council. It is a long time indeed since 
Ibe Supervisors were approached on any question with such 
unanimity on the part of the people. 



Pools Them Some 
of the Timk. 



If the Supervisors persist in their 
refusal to make possible the restora- 
tion of adequate and respectable ser- 
vice on lower Market street, they 
will have to find better reason than any of the excuses as yet 
ventured by themselves or the organs of the prosecution. The 
Call deliberately continues to attempt, to fool its readers con- 
cerning the merits of this controversy, pretending that in re- 
storing the permit, the Supervisors would be "giving away the 
complete control of lower Market street to the United Bail- 
roads." Such, obviously, is a wilful misrepresentation. The 
sole question at issue at present is whether the Sutter Street 
Railway Company shall operate horse cars or electric cars on 
lower Market street. Tt is impossible for the Supervisors to de- 
termine the validity of the Sutter Street Company's franchise, 
and the Supervisors themselves have not questioned the com- 
pany's right to operate horse cars. If the contention of the 
Sutter Street Railway Company and the United Bailroads is 
correct — that they are separate and individual corporations, and 
therefore it is impossible for the city to grant a third franchise 
to "any other company" on lower Market street — it is trans- 
parent that the Supervisors have nothing to "give away." If 
this contention is wrong, the Supervisors should at once institute 
legal proceedings to discover what rights remain to the city to 
grant a franchise to another company. The use of the supervis- 
orial club to coerce the United Bailroads and the Sutter Street 
Railway Company to recede from their position and accept the 
pretty programme engineered by Supervisor Murphy, obviously 
is doomed to failure. The club has been wielded for six or 
seven weeks, and its only result has been to interfere seriously 
with public convenience and to advertise San Francisco as "a 
one-horse town." The legal question cannot be determined by 
the ambitions of the Spreckels street railway syndicate or by the 
desire of a majority of the present Board of Supervisors to serve 
those interests. The immediate, practical question before the 
Supervisors is simply and solely one of public convenience — ■ 
whether the Sutter Street Company shall use horses or electricity 
for motive power. And in face of the practically unanimous 
demand, made in the showing before the Board of Supervisors 
last Monday, the controversy has now resolved itself into the 
question whether the Supervisors will serve the interests of the 
people or the private designs of the rival street car syndicate. 



tcntion" between his public office and private clients, has made 
his recommendation to the Board of Supervisors as'to the outlay 
of the special appropriation of $70,000 of taxpayers' money, "to 
meet unusual expenses of his office." Mr. Langdon recommends 
a plump little salary of $125 a month for Mr. Burns, the protege 
and side-partner of Mr. Francis J. Heney. the private prosecu- 
tor, to whom the District Attorney has abandoned the most im- 
portant duties of bis office. Moreover, Mr. Burns is to have, 
at the city's expense, twenty-five men under him. each at a sal- 
ary of $150 a month. The salaries alone of Mr. Burns and his 
force are to cost taxpayers $4,375 a month. In view of the dis- 
position of so large a sum of public money for Mr. Bnrns's use. 
it is natural and proper to consider what this far-famed detective 
has accomplished in the last two years while remunerated from 
Mr. Spreckels's private purse in the alleged interest of public 
morality. Mr. Burns's most signal achievements have been the 
"trapping" of the late Mr. Lonergan, by a remarkable system 
of financing and "pouring in the poison" into the unfortunate 
supervisor: long months of expensive and luxurious negotiations 
with Abraham Buef to "come through," which finally resulted 
in Ruef's "coming through" nothing hut Mr. Burns himself: 
Burns's summoning of Judges of the Superior Court to mid- 
night conferences: his intimidation of witnesses, and his fre- 
quent attempts to induce Buef to commit perjury: the espionage 
by himself and bis assistants of innocent citizens, and his own 
objections to being "shadowed ;" his engagement of an outcast 
whom he ordered to make dynamite bombs, and to pretend that 
he was making them for the United Railroads. Such are Mr. 
Burns's most notable exploits, and with all his skill at "pouring 
in the poison." "frame-ups" and fakes, he has not succeeded in 
delivering into the hands of his employer a single victim of 
those marked for his revenge. On the other hand, it has been 
mainly through the agency of Mr. Burns that the men whose 
punishment every dictate of justice demanded have escaped. 
Privately employed and remunerated, Mr. Burns has not "made 
good." What warrant, then, is there for the city to intrust its 
cause and coin to such a discredited failure? Mr. Burns's boasts 
have been prodigious; his efforts impotent. A few days after 
the first attempt to dynamite Gallagher. Mr. Burns declared it 
was "no mystery," but he has never vouchsafed a word of expla- 
nation of the on I rage which has remained a mystery for three 
months, until all Mr. Burns's skill and ingenuity have been put 
in the shade by the detective work of an Examiner reporter. Is 
the employment of Mr. Burns at an expense of $4375 a month 
warranted by his record? Is it wise? Is it honest? 



The Claudianes 

Brothers. 



District Attorney Langdon, who, for 
Lanudon to Retire. the sake of securing a handsome 

gratuitous advertisement for bis 
private practice, recently admitted that he was "dividing his at- 



The Examiner seems to have found 
a man who is willing to admit that 
he dynamited Big Jim Gallagher's 
houses. It also seems that this same 
individual is willing to go on the stand and admit that he tried 
to sell the information io the Bulletin, but that he found them 
"cheap skates up there," and was sent away empty-handed, fl 
is barely possible that the advance agent of the Examiner (lln\ 
call him a scout) has landed a real scoop, but it is certainly notb- 
ing new to find a man willing to swear that the Bulletin people 
are cheap skates. Claudianes should In 1 reprimanded. He has 
sold the Examiner information that could have been obtained 
from any one who ever worked for the Crolhers-Older outfit, for 
nothing. 

As to the dynamite part of the story, it is quite in the realm of 
the possible that Claudianes may be telling the truth, and, if so. 
the individuals who hired him should be ferreted out and 
punished to the full extent of the law. Where do the minion* 
of Burns, special agent, figure in this matter? The city and 



- T i i v 18, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISI'.K. 



Oakland police seem to be as much in the dark as the wily 
Burns. Claudianes might easilj have been caught if Burns 
would onlj consent to ahed the disguise as a finnan haddie i'i 
which be is so well Known, and take to an enchalada instead. 
Some of the assistants might masquerade as tortillas, tequillias 
and aguardiente, and earn their salaries. 

I'nlil we hear further in the matter, U is safe to lake the tale 
cv/m grcmo salis. It. is barely possible thai the Examiner is try- 
ing to fasten the crime on the Bulletin itself, and thai Langdon 
is a party to the game. Claudianes Brothers in their Act of 
the Boodler Blowcd — it sounds like a sketch team. 'Poo good, 
, to be true ! 



M i;s Alii i: LONOV OHTH. 



The Racing <i ime. 



It cannot be denied (hat the racing 
interests are beginning to realize 
that public sentiment, so spontane- 
ously aroused against (be swindling game is certain to ultimately 
wipe the pastime from the category of sports. Once the betting 
element is eliminated from racing, just so soon will the owners, 
trainers, jockeys, touts and their kind find it unprofitable to 
continue their "professions," and just so soon will the courses be 
closed, to lie displaced by legitimate enterprises. Long, long 
ago racing was a sport; but now it is merely a gambling imple- 
ment, to be used for the fleecing of the vast multitudes that, 
through their idiocy, furnish a bountiful living to the army of 
racing gentry. 



Owners of dogs in the country or 
The Dog and city should be forced to keep their 

the Automobile. animals at home or in an enclosure 

where they may not be a nuisance 
to the passerby, the foot passenger, the owners of horses, the 
bicycle, the motor-cycle or the automobile driver. Dogs, valuable 
animals, have been killed by passing autos. Last week a man 
suffered a fractured skull and other injuries by being thrown 
by a canine who attacked the man on a mo.tor cycle. Horses 
have been frightened by dogs. 

The whole array of dogs from Siskiyou to the sea. pedigreed 
and mongrel, is not. worth one life. California suffers from a 
scourge of stray dogs. They should be impounded. The motor- 
cyclist, the auto OWnei and the driver of line horses, will be 
forced to take steps to de-canine I he world unless something is 
done by the county and city officials in (bis matter. Recently 
some dog baler threw poison meal or biscuit about in Marin 
County, and- in bis mad energy destroyed valuable animals. Every 
town in Marin has its pound master, ami yet bands of unlicensed 
dogs roam al will. In San Francisco county and in San Mateo 
and Santa Clara, dogs of all classes abound. They should lie 

placed in enclosures, kepi in the confines of the owners' yards, 
dial they ma\ noi endanger the public. 



I! mi LIGHTS 
on Vehicles 



The law thai pi'o\ ides for lights on 
vehicles i- a g I one. The auto- 
mobile bas been sek* ted as a par- 
ticular vehicle against « hich 
force this' regulation. Why not enforce ii on buggies ami other 
horse-drawn vehicles? A buggj proceeding along a country road, 
no lighl to the fore 01' aft. is a prolific sou ice of collisions. The 
automobile is at am moment liable to run down some dri 
driver of a carriage or r garbage wagon. By all means, see that 

all vehicles are made to carry lights, fore and 



Chief of Police Biggy bas been COm- 

Automowi.i: R \110\s. mendably active in stopping - 

bag on the public highways by au- 
tomobilista. He has insisted on putting a stop to the practice 

of carrying no rear lights. In many ways he has taken the 
Letter's BUJ and navel is much safer as a result. 

At the same lime, men have been arrested for speeding w' 
not speeding at all: chauffeurs ami owners have been arrested for 
ting 10 re-light their rear lamps when these were h'.. 

lo the wind, and there "ere no means of knowing whetl 

lamps were alight or not. until told so by the minions 0!' | 

iso of this kind, an admonition is all that is necessary. To 
.1 man under such circumstance is stupid. 1; seems to be 

the ambition of the policeman to overstep bis instructions 

the purpose of piling up the tines. Mr. Bigg} should 

hi their quest for vic- 
tims. 



Alice Roosevelt thai was, the kind 
of an Alice-that-does-not-sit-by-the- 
fire, is in prinl again. This young 

woman has been unforgivably be-photographed, she bas b 1 

dubbed "princess." and she bas almost become a nuisance in the 

nostrils of the reading public. 'The IVohihit ionists. in solemn 
convention, have accused this reprehensible person of attending 
horse races! They say that — Oh, horrors! — she smokes cigar- 
ettes ! 

Mrs. Longworth is also accused of having placed a tack on 
the chair that was to be occupied by a foreign diplomatist, in 
the gallery of the House of Representatives at. Washington. 
We have carefully weighed the evidence against Mrs. Longworth 
and we find her guilty of all the charges except the last, and 
because of this glorious deed, a tacking a dip-lomatist. we believe, 
we voice the wishes of uncounted millions of suffering human 
beings when we ask that she be commended by the Legislatures 
of the various States, her past record he publicly expunged, and 
that she lie nominated by Congress for a gold medal. A national 
appropriation should be made to furnish Mrs. Nick with 
stronger, longer and sharper tacks, in unlimited supply. Any- 
thing that will pierce the average diplomatist's understanding, 
no matter how painful the operation, is an innovation of extra- 
ordinary merit and deserves praise. 



Where is Our 
Patriotism? 



We Americans often boast, of our 
patriotism. We swell with pride a- 
we dwell upon our past achievements 
and put. on a wise, significant look 
as we tell or hint at what we will do again if occasion demands 
it. And yet. when all is said and done, we've got to admit, if 
we are truthful with ourselves, that we are a cold-blooded, in- 
different lot, and although we may bo ashamed to admit it, not 
fit to enjoy the privileges which our fathers won for us, ana 
which they gave into our keeping. 

A convicted murderer's name linked with the exalted office 
of the President of these United States! Such has been the in- 
sult thrown in our faces by the Socialist party, and vet we sit 
calmly by and allow the members of this dastardly party to go on 
with their revolutionary work. 

Men who care so little for the integrity of this country as to 
have the audacity to mention the name of a murderous convict 
for President are as dangerous as the red-handed anarchist 
who flies a red flag and hurls bis deadly bomb, tf there is among 
the socialists (and il is a known fact that their rank and file is 
largely mad.' up of such"), who are from foreign countries, let us 
see to if that the laws are amended as soon as possible to insure 
their immediate deportation. As to those who are of American 

birth, let us see that a law is placed upon the statute books 
that will provide for their incarceration on general principles. 



One of the habitues of the frame-up on the city work 

tells me thai Pal Broderick, in order to facilitate the letting of 
contracts, takes his work awav from the office provided for him 
at the TTall to (lie office of the Street Repair Association. This 
: t easier to meet the "framers" when a job is on. but the 
quarters of the association being small, there is a branch office 
established at the saloon of one Biggins at Sixteenth and Valen- 
cia streets. One of the old soaks who lives on the free lunch and 
who is quite a philosopher, sized no the gang the other day when 
they were framing up a raid, and remarked to me that it was 

quite remarkable that when "a bunch of knows 

only about a half dozen dirty tricks, they generally knows them 
epiite well, and plays them all the time." 



ifications in street work call for the very best of all mater- 
ials, and T am told that the same eomplaisancy and blindness 
of the inspectors under M • the mixture of local 

md mud with the concrete materia - the labor 

king in San Fra time, and one of his new 

ideas is to make the way of all that are concerned in the works 
board easy, to bring l - employer and employee, and to level 
the inequalities of graft by allowing ten men to labor I ?) where 
one labored before. Thus all eli rfted and the new 

labor party grows. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 18, 1908. 



ATTENTION, MR. BIGGI! IF NOT LEGALIZED 
LAWLESSNESS, WHAT? 

Editor News Letter : 

I may be pardoned for signifying my curiosity over the utter 
neglect, of the San Francisco police department to adopt the 
initiative to weed out the poql rooms that blossom from one end 
of the city to the other. Already the attention of Chief Biggy 
has been 'respectfully called to the places where the gambling 
game is run in open defiance of the law. and it has been concisely 
shown that the detectives entrusted with the duty of closing these 
joints have made only a pretense of carrying out their instruc- 
tions — a pretense fraught with humor, at that. 

The attention of the News Letter has been repeatedly called 
to the pool rooms on Golden Gate avenue — there are four be- 
tween Fillmore and Gough streets, and to those on Webster, Ellis 
and O'Farrell streets — and it is hardly reasonable to surmise 
that the police department does not know of their existence. It 
seems impossible to prevail upon Mr. Biggy to undertake an en- 
ergetic and unsparing crusade to shul these dens of infamy: 
certainly the two plain clothes men assigned to bring the gamb- 
ling element to time are making a laughable and ineffectual 
effort to that end. 

It is said on what is considered good authority that the pool 
rooms are operated by a powerful syndicate, prominent in local 
politics, and boasting of a pretentious protective fund, and from 
the immunity from arrest which the favored gentry unquestion- 
ably enjoy, it is manifest that somebody higher up is receiving 
hush money to refrain from molesting this thriving swindle. 

At four joints on Golden Gate avenue, the pedestrian cannot 
fail to see the cards for the day posted in full view, with the 
jockeys assigned to ride, and the prices quoted by the headquar- 
ters at Sausalito. The police themselves have been seen to invest 
in a ticket, laughing as they did so. unable to hide the humor of 
the situation. And some of the higher officers in the department 
are as enthusiastic over the ponies as the tout. 

The patrolmen are free to admit that they are under instruc- 
tions not to interfere with the poolrooms, because the plain 
clothes men are specially detailed on that duty. The latter take 
their job as a joke, and beyond making an average of one arrest 
a day, do nothing to wipe out the dens that breed crime, death 
and despair. 

Some years ago I was fortunate enough to be sojourning in 
New York at a time when Tammany Hall was in the full swing 
of its pull and power ; when it controlled the entire municipal 
ad ministration as absolutely as the Czar rules the Russians. Then 
the pool rooms were run by a coterie of favored Tiger-politicians, 
and they were never molested by the police, save in an occasional 
instance when some public-spirited citizen swore out a warrant 
on his own responsibility in the hope of awakening the police to 
a consciousness of their delinquency. When the case reached the 
local court, the most severe penalty imposed was a nominal fine, 
and soon it was found useless, indeed a waste of time, for a citi- 
zen to bother about obtaining a warrant for the gambling hosse-. 
The poolrooms were by no means the only dens that enjoyed "offi- 
cial protection." for poker and dice joints bloomed with equal 
fervor. Police captains became mysteriously rich, took trips 
to Europe, and otherwise demonstrated the profit of a public 
office. The people, however, lost patience with the administra- 
tion, and by a grand show of indignation, prevailed upon the 
Legislature to appoint the Lexow Committee to examine into tin- 
municipal body. When the diagnosis was completed, the city 
was found to be rotten to the core; legalized graft was as much a 
business as the tax collecting, and it was discerned thai from 
the proceeds of protected lawlessness, millions were distributed 
by the ring year after year. 

Is San Francisco emulating our Eastern neighbor? 

After the Schmitz-Ruef revelations are we now to face more 
corruption ? 

If the pool room men are not paying for protection, why are 
they permitted to pursue their deadly game? 

It's up to Chief Biggy to take the trail without further parley 
or postponement. 

Unless the pool rooms are soon closed it may be judicious for 
Mayor Taylor to ask why they are countenanced. 

It is a notorious fact that some one collects one hundred dol- 
lars weekly from each of the joints. 

It is equally notorious that when the police decide to raid a 



pool room some one verv considerately disposed telephones to 

the boss that the police will be there :il such ami such a time. 

Under these circumstances, is it not obvious that gambling is 
legalized ? 

How much longer will it last? 

Very truly yours, 

Albert Hastingfobd. 



Is this Reform ? 



When it comes to talking about the 
extravagance in the municipal offices 
there is no stronger example to be 
observed than the one in the office of the Superintendent of Pub- 
lic Buildings. Under previous administrations, the work of 
this office was carried on entirely by one man at a salary of $175 
a month. Now. there are two assistants at $150 and $175 
a month, while John Barnett, the Superintendent, himself, who 
sits at a richly appointed desk and engineers things by pressing 
electric buttons, gets 250 plunks. In addition there is a steno- 
grapher to take down the utterings of the Superintendent. The 
office fittings are sumptuous and entirely unnecessary for their 
purpose, and in fact, everything connected with the place is car- 
ried on in a fashion that is nothing less than sheer extravagance. 
If one man at $175 could carry on things in this office before, it 
hardly seems reasonable that it is necessary to have a staff of this 
kind with a figure-head as the ruling spirit. 



An opportunity is now presented to Judge Frank H. 

Dunne to fish or cut bait. He has been called upon lo make good 
all of the accusations be has been urging against the District 
Court of Appeals and the Supreme Court. Three courses are 
open to this vociferous jurist: He can prove his charges; he can 
eat them : or he can dodge them. If he is a truthful citizen, an 
honest man and an upright Judge, he will substantiate all that 
he has said concerning the corruption of the higher courts; if 
he is a lying citizen, a dishonest man and an unjust judge, he 
will refuse to produce the evidence upon which his charges were 
based: if he is a coward, he will dodge behind quibbles and tech- 
nicalities. I shall reserve my final opinion of Judge Dunne until 
after he decides upon his action in the premises. If he purges 
himself of his contempt for the Appellate and Supreme Courts, 
I shall do likewise as concerns Judge Dunne; but if he delays, 
dodges or caves down the bank. I shall insist that he stand in the 
pillory for such persons made and provided, to be dead-catted 
and egg-slimed by the roaring populace until he has expiated 
his foul slanders and repented his vicious aspersions. 



BUGGY FOR SALE. 



In Alameda. A good business buggy; has been used only a few 
times. Cost $150; will be sold for $95. Apply Central Stables, 
Sherman street, near Encinal avenue, Alameda. 



A PERFECT MILK SUPPLY 

should bear a guaranty of purity. The name "Borden" guarantees pur- 
ity In milk products. Borden's Peerless Brand Evaporated Milk (un- 
sweetened) Is prepared Where cleanliness and purity reign supreme. Use 
It In all recipes calling for milk or cream. 



X 




CHAS.KEJLUS6' CO 

EXC13USIVE 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 



X 



No Branch Stores. No Agents. 
SECOND MONTH 

and 
CONTINUED SUCCESS 

of the 
F1R.ST SALE WE EVER. HELD 

Our battery of real bargains have silenced all sham sales. 

S20.00 and $30.00 

buys any suit or overcoat in our house, 

Paragon trousers J5 & J6 for choice. Every garment must be sold. 



KING SOLOMON'S HALL 

Fillmore Street, rvear Smter, San Francisco 



.Tii.y IS. 100S. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 




'mr&Cnv'MelteMiii Oaf 

The Democratic National Convention Kissed and flouted 

Richmond Pearson Hobson because the Congressman from Ala- 
bama warned the assembled statesmen of the perils of unprepar- 
edness for a possible war with Japan. It was an unstatesmanlike 
proceeding and an ungentlemanly action. Hobson may be right. 
Perhaps Japan is preparing for war with the United States. It 
is possible that Hobson's day of triumph may be a day of wrath 
for those who hissed him and flouted him at the Democratic 
Convention. Troy was wiped off the ancient map of Asia Minor 
because the Trojans refused to heed the warnings of Cassandra ; 
Rome was conquered by the barbarians because the Romans 
would not listen to the counsel of those who advised army re- 
forms and navy appropriations; Carthage was destroyed because 
the Carthagenians hissed and flouted the Hobsons who urged 
them to prepare for war with Rome; the House of Bourbon of 
France perished because the descendants of Henry of Navarre 
and Louis the Great had grown fat with the conceit of their own 
power, blind to the plain signs of the times, and deaf to the 
prophecies of acute statesmen and wise patriots. Within our own 
day and generation is the awful example of Spain, upon whom 
we dealt the final blow that smashed her navy, and hurled into 
eternal eclipse the empire on which, in the day of its glory and 
pride, the sun never set. Hobson may have been a false prophet, 
but it was not for a convention mob to hiss the prophecy or to 
flout the prophet. History has a bad habit of repeating itself. 
But then, we must remember that Democrats in convention are 
little versed in the damnable iterations of history, and are, for 
the most part, only concerned in the making of the original ar- 
■ticle. Wherefore it has been said of them as of the Bourbons 
aforesaid, that they forget nothing because they never learn any- 
thing. 

A petition is circulating in Alameda County propelled 

•by II)'' political desires of a lot of lovely ladies who want to vote 
preliminary to holding some of the nice, fat offices now occupied 
by grafting politicians and other mule citizens who need the 
money for the support of their families. It is a petition setting 
forth that the Oakland Suffrage Amendment League believes 
that just Government rests on the consent of the governed. This 

is ladies' logic, and therefore false logic. The petitioners in this 
instance are mostly married women, ami if they an' dutiful 
wives it is presumed that they are governed by their husbands. 

As yel none of them has asked for a divorce, anil it is again pre- 
sumed that this Government is by consent of the governed. The 

husbands vote. Therefore, once more, the governed VO 

proxy of the husband's vote. Hence this is alreadj a "jual Gov- 
ern nl" because "it rests on the consent of the governed.' 

There is too much voting in this (bneininent. If we could dis- 
franchise two-thirds of the voters it would be a better Govern- 
ment. If the WOmen vote, it will add million- of mine. 
\olcs to those already BUperfluOUS. Thai would make tb 

eminent so much worse than it is. Qo back to the babies, ladies; 

leach your men children bow to vole, instruct your women chil- 
dren how lo lie the w i s the honor 

and the duty of your vocation, li is not "the consent of the 
governed" that creates a "jusi Government;" it is the intelli- 
gence and the integritj ol the whole people. Thai comes from 

the wives and mothers ol the nation. The band that rocks thi 
cradle rules the world. 

A remarkable feature of the present reform admin 

lion in San Francisco is to be found in the cost of building 
schools, and it is causing considerable talk among the architects 
and contractors. It i- -aid thai in building temporan 
houses under the rule of the delectable Scbmitz and Unci'. 

cost an avers "in. but that the liberality of the Tay- 

lor Hoard of Works is such that the cost has been doubled anil 
the city mulcted ai the rati I room. The appropriation 

of ,$lon,iioo ],as created a reign of wilful waste, and it would be 
a wise precaution for sonic of those having the bringing up of 
the political purity infant- gate before thi 

school house- away and build other*. 



Mayor Taylor is a poet, I defy any COmpetenl verse ex- 
pert to deny that Mayor Taylor is a poet. Good, bad OT indiffer- 
ent, poetry is indisputably Mayor Taylor's sirong hold; it is, 

perhaps, his strongest hold. Astri ny is certainly not. in his 

line, and he must not attempt to impeach or corroborate poet 
(ieorge Sterling's Testimony of the Suns. In his argument be- 
fore Judge Farrington, attacking the valuations of the Spring 
Valley experts. Mayor Taylor announced without apparent fear 
of contradiction that "astronomers do not vary to the fraction of 
a second about the coming of an eclipse." True, doctor, more 
true than some of the poetry you write — but let me tell you that 
if astronomers are thus unanimously accurate in calculating 
eclipses, they are woefully at variance in computing the distance 
of the fixed stars. No two astronomers have yet agreed upon the 
exact distance of the earth from the sun. Hack lo your meters 
and rimes, doc; back to your spondees and dactyls! Let the 
splendor of the star-spangled sky illuminate the pages of your 
verse, doctor, and let us hear in the low, sweet notes of your lyric 
strains the distant echo of the music of the spheres; but refrain, 
oh, refrain, from .the science thereof. Sing your songs of six- 
pence, but do not tell us how many blackbirds are baked in the 
pie. 

It was profane "Uncle Joe" Cannon who wanted to know 

"who in hell is Ellis?" when informed that a person by this 
name would write the platform for the Republican party. Now 
an inquiry similarly expletive is in the mouth of every citizen of 
the United States concerning the identity of the Democratic 
candidate for the vice-Presidency. "Who in hell is Kern?" 
Thus far, all that has been learned regarding him is condensed 
to the effect that he is an Indiana cross-roads lawyer who gained 
local fame, as the attorney for Tom Taggart's French Lick 
Springs gambling joint. Let the slogan on the campaign ban- 
ners be changed to read "Who in Taggart's 'hell' is Kern?" 
And to think that if Peerless Bryan is elected lo the Presidency, 
and thereafter shall be dead and turned to day, this Kern of 
Indiana will stop the hole to keep the wind away ! 

No sooner have I come to bury Bill Langdon — not to 

praise him — than he bobs out of his coffin serenely to announce 
that he has decided to retire to the practice of the law. There- 
fore I am but a poor apology for an undertaker. If my corpses 
won't stay dead long enough lo rot. I may as well forsake my 
trade and turn hangman — my nooses will probably serve a dead- 
lier purpose than my funeral oration. So P.ill is going to practice 
law! May the gods defend his clients I Vet I -oppose he think" 
there will lie more profit in the law service of thi' Sprockets fam- 
ily individually and collectively than there is in the personal 
service of a Sprockets with only two leg- pullalile. 




s/s////// rWtz 



Dainty Babywear 

We are showing in a wide range of qualities and 
prices, Infants' Long and Short Coats, Long and 
Short Dresses, Long Slips, Wrappers, Sacques, 
Barrow Coats, Caps, Bonnets, Mittens, Bootees, 
Soft Kid Shoes, Carriage Robes, Crib Clothes, 
Toilet Requisites, Nursery Baskets and Furnish- 
ings. 

VAN NESS AVE. «t, BUSH ST. 



SAN FEANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 18, 1908. 



IE 



'.llV-CJfV"^"-!.^ '■ 



■i'.V»TV.',V : HJi -SB 



LOOKER ON 



.aaaflHi a; 'jKj j ,as 







z>o rc>i7 awoif ira/? 

On Mr. Taft's election, 

And all the slated clan. 
He'd bet $10,000 

Were he a betting man. 

On who will win the pennant, 

Enthusiastic fan, 
He'd bet $1,000 

Were he a betting man. 

On just what stocks are likely 

To first shake off the ban. 
He'd bet $100,000 

Were he a betting man. 

On just which horse is fastest, 

And not an also ran, 
He'd bet $500 

Were he a betting man. 

His principles prevent him 

From following the plan — 
Besides, he has no money; 

He's not a betting man. 
* * * 

There is some spice in the adventure of Miss Alice Cole. Minn 
her name was called in the police court the other morning, the 
eyes of the judge lighted with some concern, and not a little 
uncertainty, on the trim figure of a youth who stepped timidly 
forward from the jury box in answer to the charge. The bailiff 
informed the court that the boy, alluding to Miss Cole, was a girl. 
The information sent a titter of surprise round the court, but 
Miss Cole seemed nervously indifferent. She made no reply 
when the charge of traveling on the Southern Pacific local with- 
out a ticket was preferred against her, and after a few prelimin- 
ary words from the spec'al policeman, the '"boy" was banded 
over to the tender mercies of the sergeant and matron in charge 
of the city prison on Eddy street. Alice Cole made an intelli- 
gent looking boy. Attired in a light trouser suit, she looked so 
much better than the ordinary stage boy that police and public 
alike failed to discern that she was masquerading. Her story is 
an interesting one. She told the police that she was unhappy 
and had determined to leave home straightway. She laid her 
plans to improve on the modern woman by not only adopting 
men's ways, but men's attire. She is said to reside at Berkeley 
with her family, who are well to do. She reached San Francisco 
several days ago, sought out a clothes shop where the sailor dis- 
penses with sartorial formalities, looked at a suit, bought it, and 
walked into it. She made her way to the Oakland Mule, and, 
awaiting a convenient hour, left her female garments on the 
fence, and, taking the road as a boy, set out without any definite 
destination. She slept out, getting what little sustenance she 
could from people on the way, and eventually, in footsore condi- 
tion, decided to retrace her steps homeward. Too tired to brave 
the hardships of the road, she figured out what chance she would 
have of beating her way back on the train. Fearful of meeting 
with reverses in this undertaking, she determined to seek em- 
ployment. She succeeded in securing a situation as errand boy 
in a store, but feared she was not properly concealing her iden- 
tity. So she determined to return home. Accordingly, she 
boarded a train, and when asked for her ticket en route, sin n - 
plied that she had none, and had no money, and was brought to 
this city in custody. The story of a young adventurer is not 
uncommon in these days of cheap and daring literature. But it 
is not so often that a weakly girl assumes the role. She now 
seems rather shy about speaking of her escapade, ft is evident 
that it was not one prompted by" folly, but rather from the desire 
to try her luck .in the world. She has not yet informed any one 
in what name she traveled as a hoy, or when or where her hair 
was cut for the masquerade, or U<>\\- she came to think of her 



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present adventure. Those interested in the ease seem to regard 
it as one for pity, and when she next comes before the court, she 
will no doubt he kindly admonished. 

* * * 

No one, whether churchman or non-conformist, can fail to 
await with interest the results of the great meeting of Anglican 
churchmen. Some will rub their eyes and ask what in the world 
has come over the steady jog-trot of the established church so 
eminently respectable, but so repeatedly passed in the ran 1,\ 
younger and more vivacious bodies. The answer is one that will 
probably still further mystify the man in the street. The estab- 
lished church has been transformed into the Anglican com- 
munion. 

* * * 

She was shopping in one of the Van Ness avenue stores, when 
her eye fell on a remarkably green plant. 

"Will it flourish in the sunshine'''' she inquired, with a sharp, 
scrutinizing glance. 

"Yes, madam." was the courteous response of the salesman. 

"Don't say it will if it won't," said she, severely. "If it wants 
plenty of sun. 1 suppose it will fade and die in the shade." "Oh, 
no, madam." "What." she exclaimed, with a triumphant ['ve- 
eaught-yon air. "You tell me it will flourish equally in the sun 
or shade. Ridiculous. A remarkably accommodating plaid. I 
must say. My good man. why, it's a perfectly unnatural plant." 
"Exactly, madam." interrupted the salesman, "il is unnatural : 
an artificial plant, in fact." 

* * * 

A poetically inspired writer avers thai live generals will rally 
the revolutionists of Mexico t" the standard nf revolt. That's 
a modest estimate. A Spanish-American revolution cannot he 
adequately rallied with less than two score generals, all with 
epaulets. Bashes, swords and feathers. Revolutions in those parts 
are colorful and pompous, ihe net result being a sin-prising as- 
sortment of second-hand uniforms ami ex-generals looking for 
the simple lite. 

* * * 

It is not known whether Mrs. Roosevi h and Mrs. Alice Lone- 
worth will be decorated with (he ribbon of the Turkish order. 
■ i; i mi denial has emanated from the Capitol. The question is 




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July 18, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



not very important, perhaps, from a public point of view. Offi- 
cers, civil and military, of the United States, are noi permitted to 
accept without the consent of Congress, any present, emolument, 

office or title of any kind whatever from any King, Prince or 
foreign State. But the rule does not. of course, apply to the 
wives and daughters of such officers, because they arc in a pri- 
vate station and have no official connection with the Government. 
While women may lawfully accept stars, garters, ribbons and 
other gewgaws wherewith to embellish themselves, the American 
sense of propriety will be offended if such trinkets come from 
Constantinople. Turkish ideas of women are unmentionable in 
this country, and the favorable attention of the Grand Turk is 
not a distinction to be coveted by any American woman. While 
Alice Roosevelt was in Mindanao, the Sultan of Jolo presented 
her with many lurid colored remembrances, parasols, ribbons, 
hosiery, etc., but these offerings were made on the supposition 
that Alice, under the guardianship of Taft at the time, came as 
the President's messenger to wish good will to the Mohammedans 

of the Southern Philippines. 

* * * 

That was a wonderfully sensational story the Examiner sprung 
a fortnight ago when it printed in hold type a list of the club 
rooms that are allowed to run wide open throughout the town, 
and it was reasonable for the man up a tree to anticipate that the 
police would do great things to shut up these dens. But it was all 
smoke, and the noise of the opening gun is already dead, hut 
the clubs with their green cloth tables and ever-shimmering lights 
continue to enjoy the harvest. 

The club rooms are a farce, but no one seems obliged to run 
them to the wall. To the serene vision of some of our judges, a 
iluli, he it a rich man's or a poor man's club, has the right to 
thrive if it is incorporated (organized) according to the law. The 
law is at fault if it prevents the police from closing these gam- 
bling institutions. 

To be law, a rule of conduct must be uniform and exist for all. 
It must not discriminate in its operation or its effects. To be 
sure, one class cannot arbitrarily regulate the conduct of another 
class. Law is supposed to be the will of tin' greal majority, and- 
in the ultimate it must depend upon common consent. The laws 
covering clubs are sorry object lessons, and it is time they were 
amended to allow the prosecution of gambling as it is manipu- 
lated under the guise of club life. 

* * * 

Two youths are to be trotted out as candidates for the judicial 
ermine by the Democratic and Republican parlies in San Fran- 
cisco. They are busy announcing themselves as candidates for 
Superior Judgeships. There may I" 1 some political reason why 
the largest city in the West should always be burdened bj inex- 
perience and youth in its judges, but certainly there is no 
that should appeal to the people after the lamentable failures 
we have had on the bench. The public should not have to stand 
for the imposition of candidacy by such men ;is Golden, whose 
given name 1 have forgotten, and who will he on the Republican 

ticket, and a boy named G 'ge Connol De cratic 

ticket. Golden will have the "push' if him. Connolly 
has the endorsement of Fuzzy Wuzzy and the "Goo-gOOS." What 
about that aggregation of owls called ihe Bar Aasocii and 

why should they not put in a strong plea ag tint de? 

* * * 

One of Biggy's finest, who does duly at the corner of Market 
and Fourth streets, and who is more Irish than the shamrock. 

gol off a very good one the oilier day. and il has rollicked down 

the line. It seems that thai an. - . the City Supervisors, 

passed an ordinance compelling drivers to pass all safety 

stations ai a walk. Last Friday nighl a track to which was Lt- 
tached'four horses and which was loaded down with I 
returning to their homes after the day's work, trotted by the 
station, and then was halted brusquely by the leaders being 
thrown upon their haunches. Blocking the way was the officer. 
"Here, there 1 You arc to undherstand, my buckoes, yo're not 
to run your horses paaht this shpol fasther than a walk! Re- 
member thai this is to apply bechnne the hours of four ani 



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$522.50. Will be sold cheap. If interested, see mat _ 
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There is one thing that is sure as the existence of the 

earth, and that is, that come what may, New York's selection of 
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on the old man. 




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USE MAYERLE'S EYEWATER 
for one day and notice the wonderful effects 

Bright. Strong and Healthy Eyes will be the 
result. Price «o cents; by mail, 6$ cents; Per 
dozen. $5. Prepaid. Mayerle's Antiseptic Eye- 
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GLASSES 

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1558 Plllmor. Str.«t. «l Geirj 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 18, L908. 



THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS. 

There's really not much difference 

Between the Board we've got 
And that one of the last regime — 

The Schmitz and Abie lot. 
Of course, the latter ones were crooks 

Who grafted as they went — 
The present noble gentlemen 

Would never touch a (i\)eent. 

But tell me where's the difference 

So far as we're concerned ? 
The public in the same old way 

But gets its fingers burned. 
The 'joodling Board did rotten stunts 

Just for the sake of pi / — 
The Board we've got does I jem because 

It cannot help itself. 

I'll tell you where's the difference 

' And show you how we stand . 

Between the pirates that have gone 

And this benighted baud: 
The grafting crew was felonized, 

And now we find, egad, 
The present gang is Phelanized — 

It's almost quite as bad ! 

The Vbesesmith. 



THE TALE OF THE 1)1 RECTO IRE. 

The directoire gown is again making a bid for the limelight. 
Since the one appearance of the Lady of the Auburn Locks a 
couple of weeks ago, however, there have been no instances of 
any local woman appearing publicly gowned in the much-dis- 
cussed dress. The dry-goods stores are now using the directoire 
as a means of spectacular advertisement. Last week, a Van 
Ness avenue firm introduced a wax figure in its window display. 
A Market street store, not to be outdone, secured the services 
of a real live model, had her gowned a la directoire. and paraded 
her through the entire building. It was a good stunt, for pretty 
soon the building was jammed with people eager to catch a 
glimpse of the dress or what it exposed. The girl appeared to 
enjoy it quite as much herself, for she was the object of atten- 
tion for hundreds of eyes. Suddenly, while passing the toy de- 
partment, the damsel gave a mild shriek :oming in contacl 

with a young man whose eyes were Hashing danger signals at the 
rate of two thousand a minute. 

"You take that blankety-blinked dress off this instant!" he 
shrieked, "and gel oul of here. Take 1 it off this instant !" 

The intensely mortified young lady did no! take it off thai 
particular instant, but she did, however, within five minutes in 
the privacy of the dressing room. It developed later that the 
young man of the strange episode is the fiance of the bold maid, 
and she was making a little easy money on the side in this un- 
conventional way, without his knowledge. 

The firm in question had no one to don the directoire the next 
morning, for the maid who got the call-down did not return. 
Hundreds of folk who had heard of the stunt thronged the store 
eager to be shocked, but there was nothing visibly doing. The 
advertising manager, in his efforts to secure some one to keep up 
the good work, mounted a box and offered any female in the 
crowd emoluments galore for parading through the store all day. 

Subsequently another female, Bomewhat delinquent in exten- 
sile pulchritude, was secured. The advertising manager, in hir- 
ing her, took particular pains to enquire as to fiancees. 



The vacation time is come, and before going to the coun- 
try, the careful housewife is having her carpets and rugs cleaned 
and is packing them away for use when the family returns. The 
carpet and the rugs should be cleaned anyway, before the warm 
weather comes and the house given a thorough overhauling. If 
you want prompt and efficient service, you should try Spauld- 
ing's Carpet Cleaning Works, at 925 Golden Gate avenue. 



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SAN FRANCISCO 



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.li'i.r 18, L908, 



AM) CALIFORNIA ADVERTISED. 



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PLEASURED 
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"^cbtrao KttOif fat Pfo&surer' 

— QonApcw — 

By Barnett Franklin. 
White Whittlesey and Mush at the Alcazar. 

Girls, ilnn'l think of missing the Saturday matinee at the 
Alcazar this week. Don't consider missing it for an instant, 
Mabel. If you do, yon'H regret it. 'pon my word you will. 

Hear White Whittlesey is back again, and say, girls, he's got 
the cutest play you ever saw: one of those costume plays, you 
know, where he can dress up in silk stockings and ribbons and 
all those nice lacey things. Oh, but he looks per-feet-ly splendid ! 
And he does say the grandest things! You ought to hear him 
defy (he nasty, horrid, mean old king. And, my, can't he make 
love! Oh, Pansy! It's all too lovely for any use. 




Let me tell you a tittle aboul the play. There is a beautiful 
maiden whose onpicturesque title is Miss Bamilton. She is, 
ah, very, very, beautiful indeed. Since she is living during the 
period of, and in dose proximity to, our old friend diaries II. 
whal is more natural thai he should feel a riolenl thumping on 
the left side of his vesl every time be sees her? Then 

nothing more natural in the world — or, at least, not in a costume 
play. "I will-a possess this-8 red-cheeked beauty," says the de- 
lectable King Charlie, "or " What the "or" is intended to 

convey we do not know, but from a rather large acquaintance 
with the theatre, we suspect it is something particularly dire 
and dank, and shuddci apprehensively in our seats. Of ionise. 
Miss Hamilton (Bessie Barriseale) does not look upon the kingly 
advances with the favor that every other court lady on the stage 
does; she is of a different clay, is Miss Hamilton. Her bearl 
has nev-er-r felt the faintest suggestion of a flutter all these 
years. Neither the king nor his numerous rakish courtiers ap- 
peal to her. She is waiting for the lover of her dreams, and we 
feel she is perfectly right to do this, for it is a copper-plated 
cinch that she will not be disappointed. 

She isn't. He appears on the scene before the Brst act has 
progressed fifteen minutes. She doesn't have long to wait, lucky 
girl. And we see that Miss Hamilton certainly knows her busi- 
ness, for she really makes a most splendid catch. My, bul isn't 
White Whittlesey, or, rather, His (trace de Orammont, the mosl 
gorgeous thing you ever set your eves on! He wears the loveli- 
est millinery, and he's all limeades and ruffles and sashes and 
curls and things. We feel thai we could not possibly have done 
better in selecting a fiance for Miss Hamilton. 'Hie only troubh 
is, that we are afraid he'll break if he doesn't stand erect a 1 
the time. 

Well, Vivian, the moment Miss Hamilton beholds Mr. d 
Grammont a hectic Hush overspreads her countenance, and he 
heart nutters for the first lime m its career. Ami Mr. de Gram 
mont, although he has held idle affections in the past for scores 
and scores of girls, realizes before you can say .lack Robinson 
that he is really, truly in love at last. Isn't thai a line begin- 
ning? 

King Charley, when he finds nut how things are going, gets 
hopping mad, and we become Eearful of de Grammont's safety. 
We have read somewhere or other, perhaps, that it is not good 
polities to brook the anger of a king, hut, bless you, Lucille, 
our hero is manufactured of different fibre. 

What cares he for a mere monarch with unlimited power. "Pie 
upon you." says he to the representative of royally. "I intend 
to make thees lady me lawful wife; she shall noi follow in the 
train of the others, and he a ruler's plaything." This is clearly 
treason, hut, ah, it is such noble He lets Ins left band 

repose gracefully on Ins left hip and snaps the lingers of his 
right hand under the king's nose! 'Then the Sweei vniig thing 

in from of me sighs audibly and softly murmuri to I I i 

"Ain't he just grand I" 

Alter that Mr. de Graramonl gets into all Borts of luke-wanu 



Vr Hampd ' «• '*' B 

ill ti lf h- 



I 



Mild, Rich 

and 
Satisfying 

Sanchez y Haya 

Clear Havana 
Cigars 

Factory No. 1 Tampa, Fla. 

Tillmann & Bendel, 

Pacific Slope Distribir 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 18, 1908. 



and hot water. In addition to having to outwit the king him- 
self, In' is up against the machinations of a couple of female plot- 
ters who wish his torrid affections for themselves. They hate 
the fair Miss Hamilton with the worst 'kind of a stage hatred. 
for De Grammont is a regular heart-breaker, doncherknow. How 
they could share this love respectably is not quite clear, but 
we are not obliged to worry. Mr. de Grammont's love is for 
Miss Hamilton and Miss Hamilton alone. These two ladies. 
by the way. furnish the sole note of novelty in the performance. 
They quarrel, as all stage villains and villainesses necessarily 
do, and proceed to give an exhibition of fisticuffs in the second 
round — I mean the second act — that pales the recollections of 
the late Gans-Nelson bout into insipid insignificance. No blood 
is drawn, however, and the evil plotters. Mistress Middleton 
(Louise Brownell) and Mistress Wannester (Effie Bond) make 
up and plot some more. 

The course of true love never runs smoothly in stageland until 
the las) act, and de Grammont has a pretty terrific time side- 
tracking those leagued against him. He finds time, though, to 
breathe oodles and oodles of the cozy-corner brand of talk down 
Miss Hamilton's neck, as she stands with her back toward him 
in the accredited costume play fashion, to the accompaniment of 
some soft, delirious music contributed kindly by the orchestra 
off-stage, [incidentally, de Grammont always has a musical ac- 
companiment when lie orates. Xobody else in the east is so 
favored. Sometimes, by way of change, Mr. Glendenniug war- 
liles passionately in the win,-- .i- a background for the lilting, 
liquid utterances of our lover. It all adds t'> the atmosphere. 

Of course, de Grammont finally wins out after all sorts of 
trouble; the king abandons his love-quest, ami blesses the now- 
happy pair. He makes a little speech starting with his favorite 
oath, which sounds something like "Odds, fish!" and says he 
always liked de Grammont, anyhow, because ''he is such a jolly 
fellow." So Miss Hamilton marries her beautiful cavalier, 
which serves her well ami right according to my notion. 

Clyde Fitch, how could you ever do it? You will have a 
great deal to answer for on the Judgment Day, but nothing 
quite like '"His Grace de Grammont." Unce more I repeat, how 
could you, Mr. Fitch? You wrote i; may years ago, ami perhaps 
— perhaps you needed the money? That must be it. 



Thompson makes us forgive. 

Katie Barry is a sprightly English comedienne who sings 
comic songs with considerable unction, ami dances cleverly. Hers 
is an entertaining number. 

Mr. Fred Singer, with the kind assistance .if a few wigs, gives 
impersonations of the great violinists from Paganini to Kubelik. 

Mr. Singer may look like these gentle rj in his act. but 1 am 

pretty sure he does not play like them. 

Some startling acrobatics are contributed by the La Vinc- 
Cimaron Trio, in a travesty on a physical culture school. 

The holdovers are particularly happy. Jesse Lasky's "A Night 
on a Houseboat" is entertaining ami thoroughly enjoyable, and 
the same may be put down for Marcel's living statues. The 
Patty Frank Troupe of acrobats and some unusual moving pic- 
tures round out a programme that, viewed in its entirety, is 
as well-balanced as any the Orpbeum has had in a number of 
weeks. 

* * * 

The Princess. 

Tlie three-week run of "It Happened m Xnrdland" conies to 
an end with Sunday night. This is unquestionably tin- brightest, 
snappiest show the Princess has given in its career as a musical 
comedy house. 

* * * 

The Van Ness. 

Henry Miller's lavish production of William Vaiic.hu Moody's 
drama of American life. "The Great Divide," will hold down the 
boards up to and including Saturday night. 



. 1 n VANCE A NNO UNCEM ENT8. 
Mr. Charles Rann Kennedy's drama, "The Servant in the 
House," which has made such a wide-spread stir, is to be seen 
by local audiences for the first time at the Van Ness Theatre 
next week. It deals with religion, a gospel of humanity wider 
than any creed, with easy-going piety and religious humbug, 
in a style of satire and of trenchant truth that makes no com- 
promises. This theme is set forth in the relations of three 
brothers, one of whom becomes an easy-going clergyman in whom 
the true spirit of Christianity is clouded. Another becomes a 
social outcast, but redeems himself through labor. The third re- 



Extraordinary Histrionics aX the Orpheum. 

That admirable actor, William II. Thomp- 
son, furnishes a truly remarkable piece of en- 
tertainment at the Orpheum with a Clay M. 
Greene playlet, "For Love's Sweei Sake," is 
the particularly happy medium. Mr. Thomp- 
son is far Erom being in the class of the regula- 
tion legit recruit, for he i - to us in vaude- 
ville when he is in the zenith of his powers, and 
his acting is just as line and artistic as when 
he played in the theatres given over entirely to 
the drama. 

Mr. Greene has written for him a Bketch that 
is technically admirable. It. deals with the 
problem of a doting father and his son, and 
the belief of the father in his hoc'- criminality 
through the fact of the boy's own confession. 
That in- is not guilty, luit. martyr-like, assumes 
the burden of the crime for "Love's Sweel 
Sake." is what is exploited. It is a theme that, 
in the hand of a less capable author than Mr. 
Greene, could easily be permeated with bathos 
and mush. But it has in its make-up neither 
of these qualities, and radiates instead a whole- 
someness that is refreshing. I can say no more 
than that Mr. Thompson's portrayal of the 
of Sanford Morgan, the father, could not be 
better. It is of the highest type of art, played 
with a subtlety rare to the vaudevilles. Thomas 

'.".'.'" £ ":"'! f !,: t ° 1 ?, } n J h l di ^ U,t P 3 ',' ,r ''I "I! 1 - M F- Thom .P- turns » ?», ""ck °f time as the mysterious "Servant." and pre- 

from a olil 
ynne Matthisou, 
Edmund R. 
o others. 
I m account of Mr. rhompson s offering, let us draw the mantle * * * 

of charity over what we would otherwise feel impelled to say of The bill at the Orpheum lor the week beginning this Sundav 
Jom harry and Madge Hughes, who are programmed as giving matinee will have for its headline attraction the Four Fords, 
a character study of the Fast Side, with a "sentimental touch." who are unequaled in this country as dancers. The pre 




Four Fords, dancing quartette, who will appear next week at the Orpheum. 




ii ii is. 190S. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



II 



with which they work i< astonishing, and il is difficull to deter- 
mine which, if any, of them excels the other. The Tom Dai ii 
Trio, from the London Coliseum and the New York Hippo- 
rome, will make their Srsl appearance in this city, and intro- 
; remarkable cycling novelty, "motoring in mid air." 
They have a saucer-like structure of strapped lathes, and, en- 
circling it with dizzy rapidity, they pass and re-pass each other 
until their red, white and blue costumes suggest the prismatic 
changes of a revolvng top. Martinettie and Sylvester, who style 
themselves "the boys with the chairs," aTe clever tumblers and 
comedians. With this programme, Katie Barry, La Vinc- 
Cimaron Trie, Prod Singer, Barry & Hughes, and thai splendid 
actor, William H. Thompson and his company, will close their 
season here. A new scries of interesting Orpheum Motion Pic- 
tures will terminate the performance. 

* * * 

The attraction at the Princess for next week will he a greai 
double bill consisting of the two-act musical melange, "The 
Bridal Trap.'' and the travesty on the Conreid-Hammerstein 
grand opera war, "The Song Birds." "The Bridal Trap" is the 
musical composition of Edmond Audran, and the text is the 
work of Sydney Rosenfeld. Its action takes place during the 
period of the regency in France at a picturesque village near 
Orleans. It tells a pretty story set to sparkling music of a lord 
of high degree who loved a lowly peasanl girl and sought to wed 
her despite the opposition of friends and relatives. The produc- 
tion will introduce to the audiences of this theatre Evelyn 
Frances Kellogg, a prima donna of Eastern renown, who will 
appear as the heroine Rosette. Zoe Barnett, Sarah Edwards, 
Arthur Cunningham, Frank Farrington, Oscar C. Apfel May- 
belle Baker, Grizella Kingsland and Edna Carpenter will also 
be suitably cast. In "The Sung Birds," William Burress will 
repeat his clever Oscar Haininershine impersonation, while Miss 
Kellogg will appear as Madame Tappletalezini. The run of 
"Thi> Bridal Trap" and "The Song Birds" must be limited to 
one week, as arrangements entered into necessitate the produc- 
tion of the musical comedy, "The Chaperons," Monday night. 

July 37th. 

* * * 

"If I Were King." .luslin Huntly McCarthy's dramatization of 

Ins own novel n( the same name, will be the Alcazar's offering 

nexi week, commencing Monday evening, with While Whittlesey 
ii the role of Francois Villon, which was created by E. II. 
Solhern. ami played by him in the Columbia Theatre here five 
years ago. ft was the most stupendous production ever under- 
taken by Mr. Sothern, and the Alcazar management promisee to 

leave nothing undone thai might serve i lipse the original. 

In the easl are fort) five speaking people ami a il auxil- 
iaries, and each of iln four acts demands i si elaborate Bet- 
ting. The story deals with an incident in the turbulent career 
of Francois Vilhm. the vagabond rhymester who amused Frame 
when Louis XI was king, and who is made ruler for a w< 
I he plaj . M iss Barri i ' i ae, and the 
remainder of the Ucazai players -and mas people will 
have well-fittini 



Mrs. Warren and the San Prai 1 are of the 

profession the mosl ancienl in the world, and at one turn 
honorable, but latterli >n of the charai 

those who are employed a it. There is a difference, however, 

n Mrs. Warren ami the San Fraic in that the 

lady is nol ashami 

ashamed bul its occupa- 

tion. Mrs. War ait deny the ease of her virtu 

merely finds excuse and palliation for the lack of it: th 
on the contrary, a notoriously kept newspaper, not only denies 
that it is the journalistic ieman of Rudolph Spreckels, but when 
caught in flagranti dclirlu. assume - worthy of an 

Moll Flanders. On the wl 
am compelled to admire and respect M S, Warren more than 1 
admire all. Mrs, Warren certainly 

■ lit for her honesty : while the I 

universal opprobrium and contumely for its impmli 

pocrisy and its brazen effrontery. 



DR. ADOLPH ROSENTHAL 

il and aui 

Hours : 



One of tin pleasantesl of all the California resorts, and 

one that is situated clo e !o San Francisco, is Moss Beach. This 
is situated alii.nl seven miles From Half Moon Bay, and to the 
north mi the Ocean Shore Railroad. There is a station on the 
property, ami the trip is a most picturesque and entrancing ex- 
perience. The main attract am is the unrivaled bathing. Here 
we have a surf which is akin to that at Waikiki, ami as al Wai- 
kiki, there are natural barriers thai effectually proteel the 
bather from the treacherous undertow. 

The locality is only one hour from San Francisco, and sunn a 
new hotel will be built to accommodate the crowds that are grow- 
ing in size with every week and every Sunday thai passes. The 
land around Moss Beach is ideal for home building purposes, 
and the trees that were planted al this place some twenty-five 
years ago give the spot the appearance of an English park. The 
land slopes gently to the ocean shore, and the climate is simply 
ideal. 

There are a large number of new residence places and resorts 
on the line of the new road, and the attractions of all of them 
are more than ordinary, bul it. may safely be said that these at- 
tractions are duplicated al Moss Beach, and that it possesses in 
ils proximity to the big city, in its location and topography, in 
its surf bathing and its climate additional claims that are only 
approached by the others. Moss Beach is destined to be a very 
popular residence section with the suburbanite, and it will surel) 
always command the attention of the public as a pleasure resort. 
The hotel is a success as a foregone conclusion, and il is the hope 
of many who know of its manifold attractions that it will be 
hastened to completion. 



New Alcazar Theatre 



COR. SUTTFR AND 
STEIN ER STS 

BELASCO A MATER, Ownen and Maaagar*. AbiolnUlj "Clasa A" Buildiui 

Seventy-first week of the Alcazar Stock Company. Commencing 
Monday evening. July 20th, MR. WHITE WHITTLESEY, sup- 
ported by the Alcazar players, in Justin Huntley McCarthys 
romantic comedy-drama. 

IF I WERE KING. 

A great scenic production. 

Prices — Overling, 25c. to $1. Matinees Saturday and Sunda: 

to BOc, 

Monday, July 27th — Mr. Whittlesey in RAFFLES, 



Orph 



ILLIS ST . KIAR FILLMORI. 



eum 

Wepk begin) Sunday afternoon. Mali very day. 

ARTISTIC VAUDEVILLE. 
4 FORHS. WORLD'S GREATEST DANCING QUARTETTE; 
TOM DA VIES TRIO, in tla-ir astounding act, "Whlrlli 

MARTINETTIE AN'Ii SYLVESTER: KATi 
I. A VINE CI MA RON TRIO: Filial ■ SINGER: BARRT AND 

HUGHES: NEW ORPHEUM MOTION PICTI RES, Last « k 

WM. H.THOMPSON ,v i . Sweet Sake." 

Hat! prices 

i ; one west 



Van Ness Theatre 



CORNER VAN NESS AVE. 

AND CROVE STREET 

GUTTIOR MARX 1 OQ., PM|N lad Mir. Plinn. kUrk.t SO* 

Weeks i I 27th. Nig 

MATINEES WEDNESDAYS \.\t' SATURDAY 
Direct from I > York. THE HE.VRV MIL- 

LER ASSOCIATE PLAYERS nne Matthison. W 

Hampden. 1 Wynne. Edmund Kennedy. 

gai.wkv HERBERT, ARTHUR LEWIS, in the un 

THE SERVANT IN THE HOUSE. 




THEATRE 

PHONE 
WEST 663 



"■eet near Flllmora. 

Class "A" Theatre 
Prices— Evenings 35c. 50c, 75c 

S. LOVERICH MANAGER ££■£ r n C /£ c Sm,d ' yS '"" '""" 

1 LAPPENE1 ' 
IN NORDLA 

er.m.l 

THE BRIDAL TRAP 

and Ui 

THE SONG BIRDS. 

Willi.! 

■ 
cess : 



A. W. BEST 



ALICE BEST 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 



1628 BUSH STREET 



urx CLASSES 
DAT A> 



iLLrsnunwo 
BUM 

■ 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 18, 1908. 



SElfe minister of 3Fomnn Affairs 

Diplomatic relations between the 
The Venezuela Aefair. United States and Venezuela have 

been severed, but our consuls re- 
main undisturbed. The same condition practically exists be- 
tween that nation and Prance, England and Holland. This 
means that commerce will be carried on as before, and that only 
suspension of negotiations for the settlement of claims against 
Venezuela will obtain for a time. So far as the United Stales 
is concerned, the withdrawal of our minister, according to an in- 
timation from Washington, is that no further movement would 
be made, just now, anyway, to defend the New York-Bermudez 
Asphalt Company's position in Venezuela. This should be re- 
ceived with satisfaction in California, for it means that the as- 
phalt of this Slate will have a chance to enter the markets of 
this country as freely as it has entered the markets of Europe and 
Asia, in which countries, especially in Asia, there is a growing 
demand for Hie article. Perhaps it is not generally known what 
the real inwardness of the trouble between the United State, and 
Venezuela is as concerning the Asphalt 'trust. Several years 
ago, a company of American capitalists secured asphalt conces- 
sions in Venezuela by bribery and fraud. Later on, General 
Castro was elected President of the Republic of Venezuela, and 
upon investigation, he unearthed what proved to be about the 
most infamous fraud that was ever perpetrated upon a country, 
ami which had fastened itself upon his country. He at once set 
about to undo what had been done by the American company. To 
head him off, and still further secure its hold upon that coun- 
try, the American company hired General Matos to inaugurate a 
rebellion against the Castro Government under a contract that 
if Matos made good he was to be president of the republic, and 
the American company was to have the legality of its concessions 
made good beyond any kind of question. Castro, however, put 
down the insurrection, and upon investigation by a joint com- 
mission, the admission was made by the officers of tin 1 American 
company that they had appropriated large sums of money to pay 
Matos and his army to wage a war upon the legally constituted 
Government of Venezuela. Next in order was the indorsement 
of Castro's acts in the premises by the Venezuelan Government. 
Following upon the heels of this defeat of the American com- 
pany, the whole question was referred to the courts of Venezuela 
for adjudication. A little while ago the case reached the last 
court of resort, and the decisions of the lower courts were 
affirmed. At this stage of the game, it occurred to President 
Roosevelt that it would be a good thing to have the United States 
Supreme Court review and overhaul the conclusions of the 
Supreme Court of Venezuela, but some one called his attention 
to what Chief Justice Marshall said a century before: "No 
court in the universe which pretended to be governed by principle 
would, we presume, undertake to say that the courts of Great 
Britain or France or any other nation, had misunderstood their 
own statutes, and therefore erect itself into a tribunal to correct 
such misunderstandings." The Supreme Court of the United 
States did not agree with President Roosevelt, and did not un- 
dertake to overrule a decision rendered by the Supreme Court of 
the Republic of Venezuela. The decision of the Supreme Court 
of Venezuela was that the New York-Bermudez Asphalt Com- 
pany should pay a fine of five million dollars for instigating the 
Matos insurrection, and for the cost to Venezuela for putting it 
down. The Drago Doctrine, in connection with the Monroe 
Doctrine, under a ruling of the last Hague Congress, affirms 
that there is no appeal from the decision of the Supreme Court 
of a Latin-American State in matters involving claims. 

California's interest in this diplomatic controversy between 
the United States ami Venezuela lies in the realm of commerce. 
The possibilities of the asphalt production of this Stale are vastly 
greater than any probable demand for the article from all the 
world. Moreover, Venezuela asphalt is the only rival of Cali- 
fornia in the world as to quality, and the supply in this State is 
practically inexhaustible. It could be made one of California's 
most valuable industries. It has been thoroughly tested as to 
its life, quality and endurance in several Asiatic cities, and as 
far East as Brooklyn, N. Y., in this country, and in no case has 
it fa'len short of the standard of the Venezuelan asphalt in any 
particular. These being actual conditions, and in no sense 
theories, the question is, shall these vast deposits of asphalt in 
California be given freedom to develop their immense wealth and 
enter the markets of the world upon their merit, or shall the 
Government at Washington diplomatically or by force of arms 



H 



StF 



OTEL OT. T RANCIS 

The spirit of good service 

and the facilities that 

produce it. 

Coder the management •( JAMBS WOODS 



oblige Venezuela to surrender to the New York-Bermudez As- 
phalt trust and monopoly that it may renew its death grip on the 
throat of what otherwise would be one of California's greatest 
and most profitable industries — an industry that would find a 
market in every city and town on the globe that uses asphalt 
for street paving? 



To Divide I'i osi l 



The situation in Persia has taken 
on a new phase. Some time ago the 
people of Persia demanded a Par- 
liament, and appealed to Russia and Great Britain to use their 
influence with (he Shah to grant their request, which they did, 
and an election was ordered to choose delegates to such a Con- 
gress, but events since the Shah dissolved the parliament and 
placed many of the members in prison for alleged treason have 
caused the people to distrust the sincerity of Russia and Eng- 
land. So much so, indeed, that the sentiment is rapidly spread- 
ing that Russia and England have agreed to take advantage of 
the inability of the Shah to protect life and property and invade 
the North by Russian troops, and the South by a corps of the 
British India army in the name of "peace and good order," but 
in fact to ultimately divide the Empire between them. Whether 
there is any foundation for the alarm remains to be seen, but the 
people of Persia believe it, and as a consequence the Shah's realm 
is in greater distress than ever. There is no doubt about it that 
the southern half of Persia would make a valuable annex to 
Northwest British India, as Northern Persia would to Southern 
Russia. In this connection, it might be observed that Russia 
has two army corps in easy marching distance of the Persian 
border, and that Lord Kitchener, commander-in-ehief of the 
British Indian army, reports that the military establishment of 
India is numerically stronger and upon a better footing than 
ever before in the history of that possession. 



The Russian Douma has decided to 
Op General Interest. spend millions for warships. An ap- 
propriation of $42,500,000 has been 
made, with $5,500,000 available at once to lay down four battle- 
ships. Mulai Hafid is gaining ground rapidly in Morocco. 

He is now in possession of the capital, Fez, and several of the 
larger trade centers. His army increases in numbers as he 

moves northward. By a joint treaty between Great Britain, 

Thibet and China, the commerce of Thibet is to go to India, and 
China is to take over British roads and trade points in Thibet 

under a wider range of sovereignty. For re-organizing the 

Indian army and putting it upon a firm basis. General Kitchener 

is to be made an earl. More than 30,000 people have been 

killed in Persia by brigands, Kurds and revolutionists in the 
last two years. 



jm Palo Alto Planing Mills 






Our Specialties: 
HARDWOOD INTERIORS 

VENEERED DOORS 

Estimates cheerfully furnished 




SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE : 
1105 CHRONICLE BLDG. 



.Tm.v IS, L908. 



AM) CALIFORNIA ADV KRT1SKH. 



13 




UNBELIEF. 
There is do unbelief . 
Whoever plants a seed beneath the sod 

And wails to see il push away the clod, 
He trusts in God. 

Whoever says when clouds are in the sky, 
"Be patient, heart; light breaketh by and by," 
Trusts the Most High. 

Whoever sees 'neath Winter's field of snow 
The silent harvest of the future grow, 
God's power must know. 

Whoever lies down on his couch to sleep. 
Content to lock each sense in a slumber deep. 
Knows God will keep. 

Whoever says "To-morrow. " "The unknown," 

"The future," trusts the Power alone 
lie dare? disown. 

The heart thai looks on when eyelids close, 
And dares to live when life has woes. 
Gad's comfort knows. 

There is no unbelief ; 

And day by day. and night, unconsciously, 

The heart thai lives by thai faith the lips deny, 
God knowetJi why ! 

— Edward Hithrrr Ei/llmi. 



TO ARC ADV. 

Across the hills of Arcady 
Into the Land of Song — 

All, dear, if von will go with me 
'the way will not he long! . 

1 1 will not lead through solitudes 
Of wind-blown woods or sea; 

hear, no I the city's wearies! moods 
May scarce veil Arcady. 

"lis in no unfamiliar land 
l.n by soi listant star. 

No ' Arcady is where you stand, 
And Seng is where yon .ire ! 

So walk hut hand in hand with mi — 
No road can lead 08 w rong ; 

These are the hills of Lrcady — 

Here is the Land of Song ! 
tar/as Buxton Going in 1 1 mini's 




Out of the Multitude 

that enjoy the Sports on land and water 
thousands fatigue and weary and need ttie 
delight of cheer or the comfort of strength. 

HUNTER WHISKEY 

I? THE FAMOUS, FAULTLESS STIMULANT 

for such neeJs 



Sold by al] first-class cafes ami by jobbers. 
\VM. LANAHAN & SON, Baltimore, Mil. 







PER 



An 



Of 

Mu 



Koi 
To 



ISPERA AD ASTRA. 
To A. B. C. 

ire i- no liean thai sorrows not. The higher 

The path thai winds for our feel o'er shards and stones 

The sharper nils the slinging wind thai moans 

I wad- of onattained desire. 

'V thai are struggling in the lower mire. 

their sorrowing, never know the groans. 

The M ut ins-agony, the dread mono! ines 
ilia, that whoso would asp 
adder with throughout earth's period. 
Crowned Poetl Read God's message through tl 
"Yea. there shall pierce thine own heart, I 
like Mary, handmaid of the Lord, 
an of her own quivering Mesh the form 
lolhi the unseen and h\ ing 

■ — Richard II 



THE VERY LAST DROP 







delicious brew served at Bismarck Cafe 
Toft's and other leading cafes. Be Wise, 



of Weinhard Portland Beer is 
precious to the thirsty man. for 
he knows a good thing and is 
not going to let any go to 
waste. Why it's good is easily 
explained. Good malt and hops, 
good intelligent brewing, good 
and skillful care while it's ri- 
pening, and good, clean, sani- 
tary bottling. In plain words, 
it is K«od. honest beer. 

Guar .meed under the Pare Food 
• ad Drofi Act. 

All connoisseurs drink Wein- 

hird Portland Beer. It is the 

Cafe Francisco. The Louvre. 
Drink it at Home. 



CALIFORNIA BOTTLING CO. 

Bottling Agents 
1255 Harrison Street- San Francisco 

Phone Market '*~1 



K. BUJANNOFF 



LICK 
PLACE, ..IT Sutler. u*t« 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 18, 1908. 




INANCIAL 




On Hie loaning of money in this city on 
Movement of Money mortgages tin- Real Estate Circular pubV 
on Mobtbage Loans lished by Thomas Magee and Son? in its 

last issue says: "During the six months 
ending June HO, 1908, there were 8,852 mortgage; reco led 
againsl San Francisco real estate for a total of $17,153,362. In 
the same period 3,304 releases of mortgages were recorded, the 
amount of which is not given by the Recorder, as his usual ref- 
erence to the records of the mortgages has been made impossible 
by the burning of the original records. During the same period 
$9,781,462 was loaned by private individuals on 2,023 mortgages. 
Eastern financial institutions loaned $1,400,0 three mort- 
gages, and financial institutions n California outside of San 
Francisco loaned $336,110 on eleven mortgages. During the 
same period forty-sis loans were made by building and loan asso- 
:n hi- for a total of $116,412. [ntere'sl rates during the half 
year on a renewal of old loans have been from ">'- to 6 per i en] 
net. These rates on loans from the East have been 6 per cent net. 
Many of the loans under tin' head of private individuals were 
made at 1 per eenl net, luit in the hist few months this rate has 
tended downwards. During the month of June 489 mortgagee 
were recorded for a total of $2,118,462, while 343 releases wejte 
recorded during the same period. As a necessary result of the 
increase in the rate' of interesl charged by the banks, the 
rate of dividends paid to depositors for the half year has 
been idvanced to 1 per cent, all the hank.- adopting uniform 
rate. r lh" records since the fire show that in this period there 
was loaned $3,905,000 Eastern money, ami that $726,160 was 
loaned by financial institutions in California outside of Sa? 
Francisco. Some of the money included under the head of pi 
individuals is undoubtedly also Eastern money." 



Market ran 
Mining Sii lej -. 



i Ipinion seems to in- very much ftu ided 
upon the future of the market for mining 
stocks Many of the brokers on Hush 
streei expert better rimes, while others 
are quite outspoken on the other side of the question. The argu- 
ments in favor of more active trading are based mainly upon the 
accumulation of moneyin the hanks and easier money in the Kast 
whence comes the hulk of the buying orders just now. Othei 

opinions follow the oh] hackneyed election year th -v. On the 

oilier hand one or two of the Bh irpesl operators in tie raarkefl 
although they are not shorl or engaged in selling short, do ao| 
lake a very roseate view of the situation and predict dullness in 
the demand for some time to come. Ai latest reports the marked 
was dull with prices hanging around the old figures. The print 
eipal activity was in thi merger stockB of Goldfield, Florenei .mil 

Daisy. Komi demand is reported lor Montana and McNamaVS 

and West End in ihe Tonopahs. limine orders from the Eaffl 
Nevada ace reported Light of late. The output of the mine- of 
Goldfield lasl weeli was 2,385 ions, of a gross value of $186,70® 
The tonnage was greater than lie weei previous, bui the values 

were no, a- high. Ii has been decided lise the commision 

charged on all transactions to one pet cent, from one-half ol 

per eenl. The new rate will go into effect on .Inly 20th. JohJ 
McMullin was elected a member oi the Hour, I during the week. 



Work in the 
Comstock .Mixes. 



I n spite of the dull condition.- of th| 
1 lomstock market, there is nothing 
unfavorable in i lie repoi i- from Ihe 
mines for the pasi week, which are 
now on file, Ophir is still extracting ore from ihe stopes on Ihe 
2100 level, and an output of 10"i cars of ore, assaying $17.2§ 
per ion. is reported for the week. From the 22^0 level, on thj 
fifth floor, twenty-one ears of ore. assaying $101.83 per ton wesl 

taken oul during the same period, and fr the third, fourth 

and fifth floors, 212 ears of ore, assaying $32.26 per ton. The 
shipments included a railroad ear of concentrates to Selby's and 

lo the Kinkcad mill, f 'teen and one-half ions of .-eon, 

ore. The southwest drift on die SM50 level of Corn-Virginia, 

from north drift, 150 feel from its moulh. ha.- been adianced 



It feci, with the face in porphyry and quartz of low assay value. 
The joint Sierra Nevada. Mexican and Union Northwesl drifi 

from easi drill 630 feel f''om shaft station, was advanced .S feet, 
the face is iii (day. quartz and porphyry. It is out now a total 
distance of 311 feet. In the Ward shall on the 2475 level they 
are moving th blower, cooling the pump station to a temporary 
place, preparing for the lowering of the electric motor and heavy- 
pump castings. Four ears of ore of low-grade were extracted 
from Andes. Yellow Jacket has extracted 500 ion-: of fair grade 
ore. and has shipped to Selhy's !IS0,IH)0 pounds of concentrates, 



Business has I n quiei recently in 

Local Stocks and BonIjs. ihe loeal markei for stocks and 

Bond-. Sales of bonds have been 
light, with prices generally steady. In stock.-, the demand con- 
tinue- quiet, ami transactions show no material change in prices. 
The silver markei has had an easier tone. Sugar stocks have 
been linn. The quota of San Francisco National Banks of the 
$45,000,000 United States deposits thai had to be returned to 
the Treasury Department on or before July l">. under the recent 
call, was $2',365,000. 



Mining th it Pays. 



Dividend payments for the first, six 
months of 1908 amounted to $21.- 
102,188, reported by 56 mines and 
metallurgical works in the United Stale-. These 56 corporations 
lane declared to dale the enormous total id' $470,746,069 in 
dividend,-, showing that limy have returned ahoul lbs per eenl 
on their issued capitalization of $398,669,380. 



The Hoard of Supervisors has called 
City Bonds ion: Sale. for bids upon municipal bonds to 

ihe amount of $3,240,000, which in- 
cludes $1,000,000 of the new auxiliary water system bonds. 

$1,000,000 of the new school issue, and ihe re under to be 

equally divided between the hospital and sewer funds. Tin,- i- 
ihe firsi offer of the new $18,000,000 issue. The resl will be 
offered from time lo lime as the city requires ihe money. 



Bank Rooks 
Thrown Open 



The decision of ihe Supreme Court, 

throwing open the I k- of the 

wrecked California Safe Deposit, and 

'I'm-; ( pain io ihe inspection of 

depositors, will be hailed with satisfaction !c, those interested. 
Hereafter, the affairs of the bank- an- o, be conducted openly, 

as they should be, the small depositor being placed on equal 
I in" with the owner of .m accounl oi thousands. 



E. B. Courvoisier, frame maker, 1374 Sutter street, bet. 

Van Ness and Franklin. Allow me to estimate on your regilding. 



HIGH GRADE 


INVESTMENT SECURITIES 


LIST ON REQUEST 


SUTRO & CO., Brokers 


TEL. K. 332 412 MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



J. C. Wilson, Broker 



Member Stock and Bond Exchange. Stocks 
and Bonds, Investment Securities. 482 Cali- 
fornia St., San Francisco, Kohl Building. 
Telephone Kearny 815. 



Zadig & Co., Stock Brokers 

Tonopah, Goldfield, Bullfrog, Manhattan, 
Comstock, Fairview and Rawhide Stocks. 
Have option on shares best Rawhide proper- 
ties for a few days only. 324 Bush Street. 



Jdly 18, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



IS 



THE WOMEN, QOD 111. Ess THEM! 

The San Francisco clubwoman has 1 n dapped on the wrist 

three times! The other day. right out in print, too, an Ea 
woman declared that after a thorough study of women's clubs in 
(he West, she had come to the conclusion that club virtue had be- 
come a vice, in one or two places, San Francisco heading the list. 
The Eastern critic gives full credit to the place and power of 
the woman's club in the world's work, but she commiserates the 
fact that the boundary lines of that plate have been grossly over- 
estimated by the San Francisco women. The California Club, 
the especial pride of leininine clubdom, is put on the grill and 
comes off a little bit too scorched on one side. "I found," says 
this critic, "that the womeu are actively engaged in club work 
at the expense of home life. As a matter of course, this state- 
ment will be refuted, but impartial investigation proved that 
the most prominent club women either live in boar'ding houses 
or manage a home in which children play no part. When I 
mentioned 'race suicide' to an ardent young club woman who 
is not married, she pointed out to my consideration a mother 
of a large family whose husband and children adore her, and 
who is one of the most prominent clubwomen in San Francisco. 
I managed to get a peep behind the scenes of the household of 
this woman, who is an officer in half a dozen organizations. The 
husband is not a wealthy man, and a maid of all work is all that 
the family purse can afford in the way of servants. How, then, 
does the mother find so much time for club work? By placing 
her household burdens on her children, by depriving the older 
girls of even high school advantages in order that they may play 
nurse-maids to the younger children. In every instance where 
the mother of a large family of moderate means becomes a con- 
firmed clubwoman, I have found that her children must bear 
the brunt of her so-called 'wider interests.'" 

Here is meat for II In!, food chopper! Mrs. Robert Bur- 

dette, vice-president of the General Federation of Women's 
Clubs, has formulated a club creed which the San Francisco 
clubs are considering adopting for their own. The critic, above 
quoted, discusses this creed and suggests that it is far ton in- 
definite. For [ntance, the Brl article of faith reads: "I believe 
in afternoon club life for women. 1 believe in evening club life 
for men ami women together, when il does not rob the home of 
father and mother." The critic says thai if a small boy had 
drawn up the creed, it would not allow of such wide interpreta- 
tion. He would put is "when the mother does not 'renege' in 
her household duties." and there could then lie mi doubt about 
I lie purport of the sentence. 



The plan for illuminating Union Square, Geary, Post and 

a number of atreets radiating from the civic center, has borne 

fruit in the adoption of the dcsic.n submitted b] Blisa >V" Faville 

I'm' decorative lamp-posts, <> if these new posts has already 

been envied at the corner of Grant avenue and Tost street, and 
the others will be placed as aoon as thej are completed. The 
hotels, clubs ami fash n mabii shops and theatres, whose perma- 
nent quarters arc being established in the immediate neighbor- 
hood n!' 1 mini Square nave taken a deep interest in ibis improve- 
ment « ork, and the prob ibility is th I ure of deco 
posts will in the near future be extended throughout the city. 
The Hotel St. Francis, which was designed by Kliss & Faville, 
lias already lined one side of the Union Square, and 
Geary st reel frontage, with posts identical in i liaracter with those 
officially adopted For the genera] illumination of the central 
down town distr 



For the Brel time, an authoritative and complete des 

lion of the Bohemian Club Midsummer .iink> is to appear in 
print. With the permission of the dub. Mr. Porter Garnetl 

men and will shortly publish a treatise on the forest 
present' Bohemians in the red ee on the B 

River. The volume deals with the setting, 

moot, origin and analogies — the relation of the plays to other 
Forms ularlv the in masque — and 

Deluding that of 1908, which is 
given Augi - - twenty-four fa 

illustrations dep [he Bohemian midsummci 

encampment, and appendi 

all jinks since 1872, with Iheii . tits and the names of thi 
and musical direi 



SECURITY SAVINGS BANK 



Hi evna IMBRY STREET, 
San Francisco, Cat, 

Authorized Capital - - - 

PAID LTF i 'AI'tTAL 

SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS 



$1,000,000.00 



S600, .mi 

.832,000.00 



Interest at 
the rate of 



4 



per cent 
per annum 



WAS PAID ON DEPOSITS FOR 6 MONTHS ENDING 

JUNE 30. UNIX. 

DIRECTORS: WM. BABCOCK. S. L. ABBOT, O. D. BALDWIN, 
JOSEPH D. GRANT. E. J. McCUTCHEN, L. P. MONTEAGLE, 
R. H. PEASE. WARREN D. CLARK. JAMES L. FLOOD, FRED 
W. RAY, J. A. DONOHOE. JACOB SI ERN. 



Summertime Entertainment 

The vexatious question, "How shall 1 entertain guests in my sum- 
mer home?" is easily answered nowadays— get a modern Talking 
Machine. Treat your guests to solos by Caruso, Schumann- Heink, 
Melba, or Scotti — or band selections by Sousa — or vaudeville 
sketches — minstrel shows and innumerable other entertaining fea- 
tures that are rendered with nuuvcluus fidelity with a Victor or 
.Edison. Or get a Reginaphone, which combines all the beauties 
of the Music Box and is easily convertible into a Talking Machine 
of the most approved type and plays any disc record 

Remember, ours is the only store in 
San Francisco carrying all standard 
makes of Talking Machines, 

HEAR BRYAN SPEAK. 

Visit our individual talking machine 
parlrs and hear the ten new records madi 
by William Jennings Bryan in the library 

Of his borne at Lincoln, Nebraska. These 

records are on the red hot political issues 
of the day, and are the onlj ones ever 
11 utile by .1 statesman of note for public 
use The \> n Bryan records are as follows: 

SWOLLEN FORTUNES THE LABOR QUESTION 

THE RAILROAD QUESTION THE TRUST QUESTION 

THE TARIFF QUESION POPULAR ELECTION OF SENATORS 
IMPERIALISM GUARANTY OF BANK DEPOSITS 

AN IDEAL REPUBLIC IMMORTALITY 

Don't f;<ii to heai them. Yo\ Ilally Invited to visll our 

■ lern Talking Maohlm ns time and record 

you desire played 

Eilers Music Company 




975 MARKET STREET 



1220 Fillmore St. 



San Francisco 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Utah Mining Company. 

Location of principal place ol business, San Francisco, California 

works. Vlfl 
Notice is hereby given thai at a meeting <>f the Hoard of D 
on the 8th de 1908, an ;>-■■ S) cents 

M <■. was. levied upon the 
lately In United SV oln, to the secretary, at 

street, San Francisco, Calif on 
Any stock upon which this t slmll remain unpaid 

UTH DAT OP 

will be delinquent and advertised for Bale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 20th d:i> Ol 
September, 19 th«- delinquent assessmi nt, together with the 

cost of advertising and ■ 

By order of the i 

A. \V. HAVENS 
' Ifflce— Room 1 1 i 



-THE POT CALLED THE KETTLE BLACK." 
BECAUSE THE HOUSEWIFE DIDN'T USE 

SAPOLIO 




16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July IS, 1908. 




THE MERRY WIDOW BOW. 

If you think the Merry Widow hal a sight, 
Here's a new creation that you'll think a frighl ; 
It's a fluffy niching 'round the neck, you know, 
And it's rightly called the Merry Widow how. 

Try the alxn i stanzas on your piano. Tune. "Merry Widow 

Waltz." You'll be trying on the how itself so nough. No 

more will Harold tiptoe up behind the unsuspecting (lludy- 
and plant a surreptitious kiss upon her coral ear. X"t if Bhe 
wears a Merry Widow bow. it will be oh the job like a barb- 
wire fence, and he will have to come around the front way or 
keep his distance. The flare is what makes the new how a suc- 
cess. The farther and the more resolutely it sticks out behind 
the neck, the better. One thai mews down dancers and keepE 

people from getting into the next rear row of theatre seats is 

the height of the new fashion. 

* * * 

W'lni shall say thai Cupid's wings have been clipped and his 
arrow put out of join! ? Here was June, one long month of roses 
and wedding raptures, and of course' we were content to lay the 
wedding bells away in lavender for the month of July. But .Mis- 
Emily Wilson and Mr. On die I'ratl quietly lip-toed up to Mar- 
tinez and were married to the tiniest little tinkle of hells possi- 
ble. But the echo came faintly down here, and then — Such a 
babble of tongues! Why, a fashionable wedding with a regi- 
ment of bridesmaids, a bucket of printer's' ink spilled over the 
details, half the flower gardens of California plucked for the 
decorations, could not have caused a tithe of the excitement that 
this near-runaway match occasioned. For it really was D.oi a 
genuine runaway — the bride's mother — so the statement given 
"in by the family says — having accompanied them to Marline/, 
lo witness the ceremony. Half of San Francisco society should 
have been named "Thomas," there are so many doubting Thom- 
ases who take that statement with a grain of salt. However^ 
alter having the knot securely, tied. .Mrs. I'ratl came back to 
San Francisco without a word to her intimates, and pul the 
finishing touches to her packing. About thirty people were dime 
at the train to say their farewells to Mrs. Wilson and her daugh- 
ter. It was noticeable thai Orville I'ratl was no! among the 
number, and there was a good deal of chaffing on the subject. 
"I suppose he couldn'l stand the ordeal of seeing you go avtjay," 

said the girls, anil the men wept stage tears. Every one pre- 
dicted that on her return from Europe she would marry Orville 
Pratt. Instead, that gentleman joined the party at Sacramento 

and the new- i to the city that she was already his bride. A- 

lioih families were pleased about the attachment of the young 

I pie, it is hard In explain jusl why they chose to he married in 

this particular way. The general opinion is. that they had prom- 
ised Mrs. Wilson to wail until after her European trip, and al 
the last moment decided thai they would not wait, but would both 
go along. Mr. Pratt is very wealthy in his own rigid, having 
inherited most of his father's estate. Judge Pratt left practi- 
cally nothing to his s'tep-daughters, Mrs. James Kceney and 
Mrs. Harding, of Philadelphia. Mrs. Orville Pratt, Sr., is in 
delicate health, and the news of her stepson's sudden marriage 
was something of a shock to her. The older set in society were 
equally surprised at her marriage years ago to Judge Pratt. She 
was then a Mrs. Jones, a very handsome divorcee, with two 
charming young girls. The marriage proved a very happy one. 
Society is anxiously awaiting letters from the Wilson party. 
Young Mrs. Pratt did not even take her sister Charlotte. Mrs. 
Cadwallader, into her confidence, and Mrs. Cadwallader has 
lo wade through a patch of interrogation thistles, whenever Bhe 
wanders forth, while over the telephone she is kepi busj saying 
"You know just as much about it as I do." Mr. Mount lord 
Wilson has been made the official spokesman of the family, and 
has adopted Minister Wu's Chinese method of refutation — an- 
swering the interviewer with another interrogation. But after 
all, the mystery is not more than skin deep — two young people 



simply decided that the psychological moment to marry had ar- 
rived, and they proceeded to do it in the simplest manner. 

Evidently the surprise microbe is in the air, with Cupid gov- 
erning its movements. Miss Louise Cooper and Hewitt Daven- 
port were to be married in August. Mr. Davenport has charge of 
a land company in Idaho, and he ran down for a week-end visil 
to his fiancee. He was to return alone on Monday night, but 
instead, carried with him a bride. They decided that there was 
no use in waiting, and an impromptu wedding was arranged at 
the home of the groom's mother, Mrs. Davenport. The bride's 
brother, William Cooper, happened to be in town on a visit, and 
he gave his sister away. The Cooper ranch is one of the show 
places of Santa P>arbara, and it was there that young Mrs. Dav- 
enport spent her girlhood. 

An engagement announcement which created a flurry of sur- 
prise was that of Miss Grace Llewellyn Jones and Mr. Robert 
Gibson, Jr., a New York attorney. When Miss Jones went to 
Europe it was with the avowed intention of studying for the 
professional stage. She had already earned amateur laurels out 
here in B production of "Phedre" at the Creek Theatre, and a 
German pla\ given by a local society. The latter was really a 
wonderful linguistic performance, for Miss Jones was the only 
one in the cast w'ho could not claim Teutonic ancestry. One 
id' the other young women in the play told me at the time that 
just during the few short weeks of rehearsal, Miss Jones im- 
proved so in her German that on the night of the play few in the 
audience could have been convinced that she had not spoken the 
language from the cradle up. Although she found it so easy 
to acquire the most difficult languages, the language of the heart 
was supposed to lie a sealed book to her, so many had tried to 
teach it to her in vain. But evidently Mr. Gibs if New York- 
had a method of his own which took a short cut to the altar. 
for I understand their acquaintance is not of very long duration, 
and the wedding is lo take place on August loth, at Trinity 
Church. It is of a piece with her affection and loyalty to San 
Francisco that Miss Llewellyn .lone- came all the way from En- 
rope to be married here, surrounded by the old family friends. 
After the wedding they will depart lor New York, where the 
young couple will make their home. 

The arrival of Miss Jennie Crocker and the Alexander family 
gives a new impetus lo Bociety. Mrs. Alexander and her daugh- 
ters i ill inspire all the smart hostesses to lavish hospitality. 
and little Miss Crocker will take her accustomed place in the 
-marl set a place thai is much larger than her small person. 
or even her big hank account would suggest. For mere money. 
while il uoiild lend her importance, could never buy the genu- 
ine affection which every one who know,- her intimately cherishes 
toward her. Miss Crocker will he able to tell her friends all the 
fascinating details of the Reid-Ward wedding- the little per- 
gonal, intimate happenings which never get into the cabled re- 
ports, and which are so interesting. 

Selah Chamberlain of Hanford, son of one of the early May- 
ors of Santa Barbara, is al the Fairmont. He is accompanied 
by M rs. ( 'hamheriain. 

Captain N. II. Hall. U. S. M. C. and Mrs. Hall, have been 
of the St. Franei- for the past few days. 

Among the distinguished \isilors al the Peninsula are Mrs. 

A. P. Steinbach ami Mi-- Steinbach, of Portland, Ore. Mrs. 
Steinbach is the mother of Mr-. M. A. Hirschman, who is also 

al the Peninsula. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Kidder of Cambridge, Mass., who were 
at He! Monte for a fortnight before the Fourth, leaving to spend 
the holidays with Mrs. Phoebe Hearst at her charming country 

I al Pleasariton, have returned to the hotel, where they will 

spend several week-. 



-Tthe" 



PENINSUL 



Mi 



SAN MATEO, CALIFORNIA 

A Twentieth Century Hotel of the Highest Degree of excellence. Amer- 
ican and European plan. Open February 22, '08. Thirty minutes by 
rail from San Francisco. Located In a Beautiful Park of thirty years' 
cultivation. All the charm and delight of the country combined with the 
attractions and conveniences of the metropolis. For reservations or 
Information address 

J AS. H. DOOLITTLE, Manager 
San Mateo, California 



Jots is. 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



1? 



Captain and Mrs. E. I<\ Qualtrough were the guests of honor 
nt a dinn r gi a al the Fairmont before the sailing of the Heel 

Mr. mi. I Mrs. George T. Marye, Jr., who recently arrived I 

Washington, 1 I. t '., were their hosts. 

.Mr. ami Mrs. Alfred S. Tubbs have gone to Del Monte to 
spend ili'' balance of tin 1 summer. 

Among the navj men al the si. Francis this week were i> 
Beecher, Dr. E. V. Reed, A. K. Shonp, II. E. Collins, L. C. 
Parley, X. F. Outhbertson, ('. F. Cooimt. S. B. Nicholson, J. F. 
McCalin, 11. It. Keller. E. S. Aheny, M. C. Shirley, Cassius S. 
Barnes, B. H. Dorsey, E. F. Buck and William A. Merritt. 

Among the arrivals at Hotel St. .lames. July 11th, were: 
II. A. Linscott, Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Mills. Charles E. Rednall, 
Arthur Hollander, I.. Harkness, Reardon T. Lyons, Frank E. 
Carroll, W. S. Sheehan, N. J. Prendergast, Charles T. O'Kane. 
San Francisco; Dr. Vincent P. Buckley and family. San Rafael ; 
Otto (ii'imskv. Merced; (). W. Leissner, E. J. Dietrich, Stock- 
Ion; P. S. Allen. Pasadena, architect San Jose high school; C. 
Edward [nnes, San Francisco; Roger W. Bennett, Miss Grace 
Bennett, Oakland; .1. A. Weldt and wife, San Pedro; Fred L. 
Presbrey, Providence, R. I.; W. S. Perry and wife, Berkeley; 
Miss E. L. Perry, Berkeley, and others. 

Mr. and Mrs. Luther J. Holton,. who have spent quite a long 
time in Santa Barbara, are now being welcomed back to San 
Francisco by their many friends. The Holtons have taken apart- 
ments at the Fairmont. 

Mr. F. II. Goodby, one of New York's prominent clubmen, is 
at the Peninsula for several days. 

Mrs. James Louderman, Miss Bertha Rice and Miss Antonia 
Marin, came up from Santa Barbara for a lew days' visit in 
i own this week. They stopped at the St. Francis. 

Gaspar G. Bacon, of Westbury, Long Island, New York, has 
heeM a unesi of the Eairmont for the pas! ten days, returned 
lo Ins home in the East. 

'the mid-summer dances at the Peninsula clubhouse Saturday 
evenings are exceedingly popular. The spacious verandas afford 
a delightful resting place, where refreshments can be had, and 
the pool and billiard parlors and bowling alleys appeal to those 
not fond of dancing. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. K. Warren, of Three Oaks, Mich., are at the 
Fairmont for a lew days' slay. Mr. Warren is the manufacturer 
id' the famous Warren's Featherbone, which has been a boon to 
every woman. 

Dr. and Mrs. Ira 1'. Trevitt, of Buffalo, New York, are at the 
Fairmont during their stay in San Francisco. 

Mr. .1. Ruperl Foster, the veteran hotel man of Marysville, 
«as a visitor ai the Peninsula during the week. 

W. W. Chapin and wife, of Sacramento, arc ai the Fairmont 

for a week or two. I'.esi.les being One of the largest wholesale 
hardware and plumbers' supplies dealers m the town of Sacra- 
mento, Mr. Chapin bas a verj large and profitable olive orchard. 
Judge Thomas I' 1 . Donnelly, or New York, widely known as 
the author of the anti-trusl lav thai al I both state and Fed- 
eral Court tests, is at the Si. Francis, with a pa 
from the Denver Convention, including .lames Kearney ami 
John II. Rogan. They will go from here to Portland, an 

to the Yosoiuito. During have 1 u guests at 

the San Mateo home of A. J. Rich. 

Joseph Eastland came up to the cil\ a d ! I [0 and too], 

rooms al the St. Francis. 

Mr. and Mr-. F. I',. Ilunlci 
Francis. 

F. F. t lory, a prominent attorney ol 
Mrs. (ol,. \| .- 'Mr,], \|. Cory, Mi>s Catherine IF 
Master Martin F. Cory ami Master Benjamin 11. Corv. form a 
inl f.iiniU party thai are spending a couple of months at 

Pel Monte. 

Mrs. C. 1'. Jameson. W. M. Jameson. Dr. Roland Pope and 
W. I'ope compose a part) ot Colorado Sprii 

people H St. 

Mr. I . Van Orden, the popular chief clerk of the S 
spcnl Saturday 'en insula. 

The many friends ol Mrs. \. 1'. Redding will he glad to know 

thai she ha- passed through i»i ippendicitie, an! 

on the road to ill return 

Peninsula. Sail M lilition will 
permit. 

THE STAR HAIR REMEDY, the best tonic: restores color to gray 
hair; stops falling, cures dandruff; grows new hair. All druggists. 





10% 


10% 


10% 




10% 


Taft $ Pennoyer's 

Semi-Annual 
Discount Sale 

Commencing Wednesday, July 8 

A general discount of ten per cent will be given on all 

goods purchased during July. 
This discount does not apply on the many lines of 

goods already specially reduced more than 10 

per cent. 
The few exceptions are goods sold "net" under con- 
tract with the manufacturer, muslins, sheetings, etc. 

Uih st BROADWAY 

After October 1 in our new store at Clay, 14th tolSth 


ioi 


l&jb 


lOO/o 


10f 


10% 




10% 


lOfo 


lOfo 





Mr. I. W. Hellman, the millionaire banker, is a guest at Hi 
Peninsula, San Mateo. 

Hon. C. A. Grow and wife, of -.'.Mo Fillmore street, will re 
turn to the Peninsula next week lor an indefinite stay. 

Among recent arrivals at the Peninsula were: Mr. and Mrs 
H. L. Judue, Mr. and Mrs. D. M. McElrov, Mr. and Mrs. IF i; 
Burke, Mr. and Mrs. J. IF llillman. Dr. F. H. Frenzel. Mrs 
Freyer, Mr. H. P. Hill, Mr. and Mrs. T. A. Woods, Mr. F. A 
Hayes, Miss Hayes. Mrs. J. (). Haves. M. Diaz. Lieutenant F 
S. Jackson, F. S. X., Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Jackson, Mr. I' 
Mendelsohn, Miss P.. Powell, Mrs. A. P.. Steinbach, Miss Slein- 
liaeh. Miss Elsie Clark, Mr. and Mrs. (I. W. Morse, Miss Wal- 
lers, Mr. Charles H. Warren. Mr. and Mrs. Noel Eaton, Mr. ami 

Mrs. Z. W. Reynolds, Mr. ami Mrs. R, P.. Dawson. 



FIVE GLORIOUS DAYS 
AT MATCHLESS 

DEL MONTE 

need only cost, you 
$24.75 

you can pay more if you wish. But this 
amount will cover your entire railroad 
fare, room and board for five days at 
the finest resort in the world. 

Write today fur reservations 



H. R. 

Manager 



WARNER 
Del Monte 



The Majestic— A 
Homelike Hotel 

Retmed surroundings, the very lest cuisine, perfect service, moderate 
prices. Rates on application. N. W Corner Sutter and Cou^h. 



HOTEL EMPIRE 

BROADWAY AND 6,J STREET 

■ Lliu 

NEW YORK CITY 

A FAMILY and TRANSIENT HOTEL 
sr" the Best Class 

IN THE VERY CENTER OF EVERVTHINll 
WORTH WHILE 

*_AFE jnJ RESTAIRANT NOTED for excellent rM service snJ 

moderate 

Rooms with JetacheJ bath $t.w> per Jav ana ur- 

-. with private bath m» 

Parlor, tearoom and bath 
Sena for Free GUIDE TO NEW VORK. 

- 




18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



.Idly 18, 1908. 




Santa Cruz Casino, natatoriums and pleasure pier. 



UH&EMfeTABLE 




Tf would be impossible to say anything about a book by 

a local author that was in the least complimentary without being 
accused of being influenced by friendship or pride of locality, 
a sort of literal y patriotism. The reviewer will risk all sorts of 
contumely, and will say complimentary things of the book called 
"The Irresistible Current." In the first place, the title is a good 
one and ought to help sell the book. In the second place, the 
book is well written and of a very superior order as far as char- 
acter description goes. Its dialogues are natural, and are filled 
with a homeliness that is alluring. 

The book deals with the fears and the travail of the orthodox 
mother and father of a bright young Jew, who has emigrated to 
New York, lie is followed thither by the young sister, who set-' 
lies easily into the life at the big metropolis, and finally marries 
one of her brother's friends. Some parts of the story are quite 
pathetic, and will appeal to the reader. In what is properly part 
two, and after an interim of twenty years, the story is taken up 
again, and the second generation of the original characters to 
the -lory taking up their residence in New York is told. The 
story of Lavalle and Laura form what is the basis of the name 
of the book, "The Irresistible Current." The hero of the story, 
whose happiness is all but blasted on the rocks of racial and re- 
ligious prejudice, dreams of an eventual leveling of all differ- 
ences. I do not know if Mrs. Lowenberg dreamt of teaching a 
al with the tale, but at all events, she has written a compli- 
cated story and written it well. Mrs. Lowenberg is very well- 
known in San Francisco as a club woman and society lady, but 
these be no claims to the kindly consideration of the reviewer, 
and in reading the story, the author's personality was lost sight 
of i onipletely. The illustrations to the book arc only mediocre, 
and the publishers should have made a greater effort to keep 
i he general standard of the work up to the notch set by the au- 
ihor. The Broadway Publishing Company. 



The Hotel Rafael has been the rendezvous of the elite of 

society for the past two weeks. Many San Franciscans have 
made it their headquarters for a week-end outing visiting friends 
who are stopping al the Rafael for the summer. The automobile 
enthusiasts patronized the Casino grill in their trips to and from 
Lake County, and the northern pari of the State, and while on 
the swing around the Marin circle. The tennis championship 
games attracted the attention of all lovers of our-door sports, and 
the week generally has been a gala cue. 



Echoes of the fete ai the Vendome ai San Jose come float- 
ing back as the subject ■>( evening Boeial reminiscences. On the 
Fourth of July, through the efforts of the manager, Mr. Lake, 
the fete at the Yeiclunie was made a gala red letter night, and 

i ne so fortunate as to have a bid to the function will ever 

forgel the affair. The grounds were lighted with electric lamps 
and lanterns were strung everywhere. The scene, likened unto 
one in Hawaii, was designed through the artistry of Mr. Lake, 
who. lor a time, was the manager of the Moana, Ihe largest hotel 
on the island of Oahu at Honolulu. There are at the preseni 
time two hundred guests domiciled al the Vendome hotel, and 
Mr. Lake has already given it a repute, a- to Ms cuisine and ser- 
vice, that bas spread far ami wide. The grounds are large and 
are dignified by splendid trees, and the guests are furnished 
with every possible amusement. 



Mr. Eugene Corn, the bailee, has removed to 15 Kearny 

street, where lie will be pleased to see his mam friends. Mr. 
Korn has a reputation in his business that is second to none, and 
his fine stock of hats, his removal to a more popular locality, is 
sure to bring him a large increase in trade. The ap-town store 
at 926 Van Ness is still continued. Mr. Korn has been in busi- 
ness for twenty year-. 




Innovation Trunk 



We are the sole agents for the celebrated Innovation 
Trunk for this locality — the only wardrobe trunk that can 
not be placed on its sides or turned upside down. In it 
your clothes hang as in a closet. There are also com- 
partments for hats, shoes, shirts and waists. A guaran- 
tee goes with it. 

Van Ness DO/^C DDAC Fillmore at 
at Bash KV/V/O DlVV/Oi O'Farrell 



.Iii.y is. 1908. 

USE 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



19 



r 



nn=iG 



UBU 



DI=1G 



3E=][ 



Fortieth Anniversary Number 



=i 



JULY OVERLAND cTWONTHLY 



At All News Stands 



CONTENTS: 



FRONTISPIECE HIS EXCELLENCY, WD TING PING 1 

FRONTISPIECE ANDREW CARNEGIE 2 

FOUNDING OF THE OVERLAND MONTHLY GEORGE WHARTON JAMES 3 

THE WORST BANKING SYSTEM IN THE WORLD ANDREW CARNEGIE 13 

SPIRITUALISM M. GRIER KIDDER 16 

PRACTICAL PLANS FOR THE HOME BUILDERS DAEDALUS 20 

Illustrated with photographs and drawings by Samuel Newsom and Sydney B. Newsom. 

SAN FRANCISCO (Poem) HARRY COWELL 26 

A NEW LIGHT IN INDIA RAM NATH PURI 26 

Illnsltai.il with photographs. 

HANGTOWN ON THE CREEK (Verse) . ALFRED C. GOLDNER 29 

THE UNCHARTED VALLEY (Story) . . . KENSETT ROSSITER 30 

THE STORY OF DUKE K'UNG .... ASHBY FORD 37 

Illustrated wltb photographs. 

ACROSS THE TABLE (Story) .... WALTER AIJOLPH ROBERTS 42 

RESURRECTION (Poem) LANNIE HATXES MARTIN 46 

BILLY-THE-KID (Story of the Outlaw) . J. E. SLIGH 46 

Illustrated ■ rraphs. 

TO EDWIN MARKHAM (Poem) F. G. MARTIN 63 

Illustrated with portrait. 

THE PACIFIC SHORT STORY CLUB HENRY MEADE BLAND 64 

A NOBLE BIRD-CITIZEN MILLARD F. HUDSON 67 

Illustrated with photograph. 

MODERATION (Poem) LOUISE AYRES GARNETT 60 

THE CIRCE OF LAHONTON BASIN (Story) RICHARD L. RINCKWITZ 61 

PERFECTION (Poem) BARNETT FRANKLIN 65 

SEEING SEATTLE NINA ALBERTA ARNI'T M 

Illustrated with photographs. 

DAWN (Poem) DONALD FRAZER 70 

ARMY VS. NAVY LIFE LRTHUR H BUTTON 71 

NATIONAL SENSITIVENESS WILL SCARLET 72 

GALUSHA A. GROW, FATHER OF THE HOMESTEAD 

BILL EDWIN MAXEY 74 

AN OLD MAGAZINE DONALD A FRAZER 

MISS F. SOULE CAMPBELL M 

Portraits of President Roosevelt and Brigadier-General Frederick Funston. 

NOTED CALIFORNIANS SERIES William Keith and Joaquin Miller. S5 

IN THE REALM OF BOOKLAND W 






$1.50 THE YEAR 



15 CENTS THE COPY 



DDE 




20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 18, 1908 




TOIOMLE 



^L 



.1. \V. Leavitt lias sent a communication to the Park Commis- 
sioners asking that the main drive be opened after six o'clock, 
>o that those who live in the Richmond District may travel home 
that way after closing hours, instead of going up over the Stan- 
van street hill. There is a great deal of justice in this request, 
in as much as the automobile is now an accepted vehicle of con- 
veyance, with an equal consideration with the horse-drawn 
vehicle. Therefore, it seems a little antiquated for the 
Commissioners to hold to the rules which served in the 
pioneer days of the motor car. There is no restriction to horse- 
drawn vehicles, and the fact that some of the hired cars at times 
break not only the Park ordinances, but the State laws, there i- 
no reason why the law-abiding citizen who owns an automobile 
should suffer. For the Park Commissioners to make rules which 
close roads for the reason that it will prevent some drii - Erom 
breaking their ordinances, means that the Commissioners ac- 
knowledge their inability to cope with the situation. The city 
sustains a police force for the purpose to see that laws and ordi- 
nanees are enforced, and the action of the Park Commissioners 
reflects on the municipal police department. Give every law- 
abiding citizen all the chances possible for him to enjov the great- 
pleasure ground of the city. It is his right and title. It is his 
money, collected as taxes, that makes it possible for the Park- 
to exist. 

* * » 

A week from to-day the Automobile Dealers Association of 

California will hie themselves to Del Monte-by-the-Sea. There 
is to be a reliability run. with a gymkhana finish. On Sunday 
it is expected that they will continue the gymkhana programme 
in front of the hotel, leisurely returning to the city Sunday af- 
ternoon. 

* * * 

The automobilists of the East are having fun on the Gliddcn 
Tour (?). The annual run this year of the American Automo- 
bile Association is anything but a pleasure run, and those who 
have taken part realize that it is not only a strain on the car but 
the driver, and there will lie many who will fail to appreciate the 
joy, putting the run down as an experience not to be repeated if 
they can help it. The event has resolved itself into a manufac- 
turers' battle, and those who are lucky enough to come through 
with a clean score will promptly climb on a pedestal, properly 
labeled IT. A run of this kind means something as to the 



SONOGRAM OILS 

ARE BEING USED BY THE 

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 
AUTOMOBILES and MOTOR LAUNCHES 



Pacific Coast Distributors 

Geo. P. Moore Co. 



721 Golden Gate Ave. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



durability of the automobile, hut some slight disarrangement, 
which, under ordinary touring, would not appear, is likely to 
cause a penalization, which is an injustice to the make of ear. 
Half these cars, when they get through with the run. have to 
limp to the repair shop to get an overhauling, which, if charged 
to a private owner, would lie a staggering amount to be charged 
to upkeep. The testimonial, from an honest, intelligent owner 
who drives his ear. is worth all the Gliddcn Tours put together. 

* * * 

The vigorous wink of the Mahonevs [not brothers), police 
officers, has brought out a wait from the motoring enthusiasts. 
Tin-,- iwo have been a paying investment to the city. Since 
the News Letter suggested that they get busy corralling those 
who make night hideous with their wild rides, they have been 
iimre ili. hi active. This activity seems to have taken a form id' 
a chronic stale with them, for not only have they corralled the 
rent driver, with his passengers, who thrive in the red-light glow, 
but has turned his attention to the law-abiding citizen, on mere 
technicalities. The fact that a dealer fails to put a little, tin 
register tag on a brand new machine which he is exhibiting to 
a customer, is not a just cause for arrest. Technically it is an 
infraction of the law. but the intent of the law is not served 
by such enforcement. The dealers are the last ones to defy. 
The fact that it only costs fifty cents for duplicate numbers 
shows that it is merely an oversight on the part of the driver 
when he proceeds without a tag. There are not so many auto- 
mobile dealers and men employed by them that it is impossible 
for the Mahonevs to remember who they are. If all laws were 
enforced to the letter, there would be no need of lawyers and 
judges. But it is the interpretation of the law and the purpose 

for which it was enacted. Man is not a machine, but a discern- 
ing being, and it is to he hoped that the Mahonevs (not brothers) 
may lie shown by those in authority how to display some discern- 
ment. 

* * * 

Mrs. Isobel Strong has joined her mother, Mrs. Robert Louis 



It Pays to Know the AUTOCAR 




Winner of the 

50 Mile Race 

free for all cars at Philadelphia 
June 13th, '08 



MODEL XIV ROADSTER 



Walter C. c7Worris 

WESTERN DISTRIBUTOR 

640 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco 



• 



Jn.Y 18, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



21 



Stevenson, in Santa Barbara, where they will atari on a motor 
trip of several months. Mrs. Stevenson has recently purchased 
,i handsome, big touring ear, and in il she and her guests will 

explore the southern pari of the State. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Homer King have left in their motor ear for an 
extended trip through the northern part oi' the State. They 

will be away several weeks. 

* * * 

James Phelan is exploring the Tosemite Valley and vicinity 
thereabouts in his big motor car. He has among his guests 
Mrs. J. Downey Harvey and Miss Harvey. 

* * * 

Miss Jennie Crocker is due to arrive in the city in the course 
of a few weeks, after a most enjoyable visit in Europe. She will 

come across the continent in her motor ear. 

* * * 

The Stromberg Motor Devices Company has opened up a 
branch store and shop for installing carburetors, at 426-428 Van 
Ness avenue, where they carry a complete stock of all sizes of 
carburetors, manifolds and fittings, for every known make of 
car. 

'The policy of the Stromberg Motor Devices Company follows 
out the lines of having a branch store on the Atlantic, and one 
on the Pacific Coast, to take care of the extreme Eastern and 
Western business, and the factory being centrally located at 
Chicago, takes care of all the central and middle Western trade. 

The Stromberg Motor Devices Company is the outcome of the 
consolidation of the various independent telephone concerns in 
1903, when Alfred Stromberg and Androv Carlson sold out their 
interest in the Stromberg-Carlson Telephone Company, to the 
independent Trust, now known as the Stromberg-Carlson Tele- 
phone Company. 

John S. Goldberg, the inventor of the Stromberg Carburetor. 
formerly known as the "Goldberg," was employed by the Strom- 
berg-Carlson 'telephone Company, as a mechanical and design- 
ing engineer, and at the time id' the above-mentioned consolida- 
tion "i- sale, be was experimenting on carburetors. These ex- 
periments were earned out fur I he last three years, and. mi 
.Ian nary 1, 1908, the Goldberg Motor Car DeT iees Manufacturing 
Company was formed, with Alfred Stromberg as President, 
John S. Goldberg as vice-President, Androv Carlson, Treasurer, 
ami Charles W. Stiger, Secretary and General Manager. 

The factory was temporarily Located al L8S1-58-56 Michigan 
avenue, in the Winton Building, and has long since outgrown 
these quarters. All Stromberg Carburetors are manufactured 
and tested -nil before shipment, under the personal supervision of 
Mr. Goldberg, more care being taken in tin' manufacture ol 
Stromberg Carburetors, and the testing of same, than in many 

high-priced motor ears. 

Stromberg Carburetors are sold on thirty days free trial, and 
a five years' guarantee, to give absolute satisfaction. Ninety-nine 
per cenl of automobile I roubles are due to poor - a; bural ion, caus- 
ing the engine i>> pound, plugs to become foul, a:, 

become loose, All of these I roubles are eliminated by the Strom- 
berg Carburetor. 

Mo>i manufacturers ol Carburetors endeavor to make them as 
eheap as the} can, and sell them for as much money as they can, 
hut Hie Stromberg Motor Devices Company manufacture 
carburetors as good as they can, ami sell them as reasonabl 
possible. 

Carburetors as a rule are handled through supply dealers and 
jobbers, who are aol eqo do not employ men capable of 

installing and making adjustments, and to overcome th - 
the reason for the branch, pletely equipped in every way. be- 
ing opened in San Francisco, to take care of all the coast trade. 

Mr. William R. Johnston is in charge of the branch. He was 

merly the manager of the Excelsior Supply Company at 

• * • 

Mr. Howard II. Sbinn and family have just returned from i 
trip to Lake Tahoe in their Pullman touring ear. and had a 
very enjoyable outing, without the slightest mishap or ,-. 

• • • 

-ecu on the roads in the northern par; of the 
Sts ek was Frank 0. Renstrom, of San Fran - 

his Pullman i e trip th 

the northern part of the S Is a number of • 

of the Pullman machines. 



FRANKLIN 

Automobiles 



The Franklin family touring-car weighs 
1600 pounds. Any other of its power 
weighs 2000. 

The S-passenger Franklin weighs 2200 
pounds; — the average 5-passenger automo- 
bile, a third more. 

The 6-cylinder, 7-passenger Franklin 
weighs 2600 pounds;— the average 6-cylinder 
7-passenger automobile, 4000 pounds. 

An ounce of ability is worth a 
pound of bulk. 

Come and let us prove it. 



Consolidated Motor Car Co. 

S. C. CHAPMAN, Manager 

406 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

Telephone Franklin 3910. 



Los Angeles Branch 
1018 S. Main St. 



H. W. BOGEN 

Automobile Accessories of all kinds. 
AJAX Tires 



4t>0 Golden Gate Ave. 

Phone Franklin 249 

SAN FRANCISCO 



SAN FRANCISCO 



LOS ANGBLBS 



Chanslor $ Lyon Motor Supply Co. 



MN< ORPOIUTIIn 



Automobile Accessories 
LARGEST AND MOST COM- 
PIBTB STOCK ON THE COAST 

Agents for HARTFORD TIRES 



B. D. McCOI 

Secretary »od Maoater 



M2-4-6 GOLDEN GATE AVBNCB 

San Francuco. Cal 



LOCOMOBILES FOR HIRE 

SPECIAL RATES FOR THEATRE AND SHOPPING PARTIES. 

GENERAL MOTOR CAR CO. 



Phon. Market 1198 



14th and Valencia Sta. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 18, 1908. 



To the Members of the Automobile Club of California. 

Mr. Rufus P. Jennings, chairman of the California Promotion 
Committee, calls attention in a matter which may be of interest 
to the members of this club. Mr. Jennings writes :i? follows: 

•'It has occurred to mo that the committee could be of greal 
service to your members when they are planning automobile trips 
through the different counties of the State. 1 would suggi - 
that in the next circular letter to your membership you state 
that the committee will lie very glad indeed to furnish any of 
them with information on California subjects or on any counties 
in the State, f presume that when taking these automobile trip- 
many are going through new country for the lirst time, and I 
led sure their interest would be greatly enhanced could they have 
an opportunity of reading up about the districts through which 
they will travi I." 

Mr. Jennings' suggestion is a very valuable one, and offers a 
very excellenl opportunity for the members of this club to avail 
themselves of the literature and information so freehj offered by 
the California Promotion Committee, the address of which is 
California Building, Union Square, this city. 

Very truly, 

Tut: Executive Committee. 
Leslie E. Burks. Secretary. L. P. Lowe, Chairman. 
* * * 

The Plane) Oil Co.'s automobile oils, having passed a rigid 
inspection by experts delegated for that purpose, have been 
adopted le the United Stales Govern or in their various de- 
partments, for automobile lubrication. This is particularly 
noteworthy, when it is taken into consideration the great amount 
of samples of other high-grade oils submitted lor the same test. 
Bass-Hueter Co., the distributors, report their sales as steadily 
increasing, not only in San Francisco and vicinity, but all 
through the interior, where they maintain a long lisLof agencies, 
and at their several branch houses, which are located at Los An- 
geles, Cal., Portland, (tie., and Seattle, Wash. The automobile 
public are realizing what a high-grade of lubricants Planet oils 
no. which accounts for the enormous and wonderfully increasing 
demand for these l: I-. 



Oldsmobile 



The car of staid value. No radical 
changes from year to year. 

Refining and strengthening—the 
Oldsmobile policy. 



IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 

Model X2--35 H. P. $2150.00 
M--40 H. P. §2900.00 
Z--60 H. P. S4380.00 



Pioneer Automobile Co. 



524 20th St,. 
Oakland 



901 Golden Gate Ave. 
San Francisco 




[Made in York] 

"Not only the best, for the price but, the best. at. any price 

Ask the man who owns one." 

Model H Touring Car $2050.00 

6-30 Roadster 2900.00 

4-40 Roadster 3150.00 

Model I Touring Car 3400.00 

Immediate delivery San Francisco it the above prices. 

Repairing in all Branches, Painting and Supplies. Agents 

Supplementary Spiral Springs 

FRANK O. RENSTROM CO. 

424-446 Stanyan St. Phone Park 476 



WRAPPED TREAD 

TIBS 

GUARANTEED 





FOR 

5,000 MILES 
RIDING 

Write for a copy of that 
Guarantee, stating size tire 
you are using. 

Address Dept. A / 

AJAX-GRIEB 
RUBBER GO. 

General Office: 

N. E. Corner 

57th Street and 

Broadway 

NEW YORK 

Pacific Coait Hranchoi' 
San Pranei»co, Cal.. 4S< 
Golden Gate Ave.; U> 
Angel««. Cal., 1040 S 
Main Street 
Seattle, Wash. 
I I 3 Brofcd 
way. 



Auto Trimming 

Tops, Cushings, and Curtains 

Coverings for seats, tops, lamps, tires, etc. 
We do all kinds of trimmings to order. 

AUTO TOP M'F'G. CO. 

504 Golden Gate Ave., near Larkin, San Francisco 



Jolt 18, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



23 



"We have just received word from London that a thirty 
horse-power White won second in its class in the two thousand 
mile reliability run recently held in England," said C. A. East- 
man, Pacific Coast sales manager of the White Company. 
••While one would hardly expect us to say much about running 
second in any trial, at the same time this run was such a severe 
one that we are well satisfied — in fact, proud of the performance 
of our car. The run started with a two thousand mile reliability 
test, in which there were three or four hill-climbs. Each car 
carried an observer, and was penalized for stops and adjustments 
of all kinds. The run ended at Brooklands, which is a well- 
known raeing track in England, and there the cars were started 
on a two hundred mile run around the track." 

* * * 

The races at Dieppe showed in a marked manner the advan- 
tages of the Michelin Tire. Lantensehlager, in the Mercedes, 
won the first prize. His car was equipped with the Michelin tire. 
The Benz car. driven by TTemery, won the second prize. This 
also had the Michelin tire. The Benz won the third prize, was 
driven by Henriot, and the Michelin tire was used. This course 
was run in fast time, and the main trouble with contestants who 
fell by the wayside or who did not score was, as a rule, tire trou- 
ble. There were five winning entries in the "voiturettes" or run- 
about class, and all five winners were equipped with the Miche- 
lin. Michelin tires have shown their superiority at the Elkwood 
Park meet, the Targo Plorio, Briarcliff, Savannah, Ormond and 
Jamaica. The Michelin has been in all these races, a prime fac- 
tor in establishing world's records. 

* * * 

A "grand prix" race is projected by the New York Club that 
attaches "of America" to its name, although most of its man- 
nerisms are of Europe. It will not hold a common race for a 
grand prize — no, no! It is the "grand prix" "of America." Yet 
Mr. Shattuck, who talks of "petrol cars" has gone abroad. The 
situation, says a New York motorist, recalls the familiar quota- 
tion about "You may break, you may shatter the vase, if you will, 
the scent of the rose will cling to it still." 

* * * 

A most remarkable record of being 100 per cent victorious 
was made at the hill climbing contest of the Rockville, Conn., 
Automobile Club, by cars fitted with Fisk I ires. They were 
entered in four events, and won first place and something more 
in each ease, one time finishing one, two, three. In event four, 
I hey were firs I ami third; in even I five, thej "ere firsl ami third ; 
in event sb they were first ami second; in evenl seven, Pisk tires 
« ore firsl, second and third, 



All that is Best in Motor Car Construction 







PACKARD '09 Touring Car 




CADILLAC 

30 horse power, four cylinder, 5 passenger SI 550.00 




453 Golden Gate Are. 



San Fr 



MICHELIN 



AS 
USUAL 
IN THE 



WINS 

GRAND PRIX 



First* Day and Second Day 



In the race for Voitures or large cars over the 
Dieppe coarse, of the Automobile Club of France, 
the first, three cars to finish were as follows: 



First., Mercedes car, driven by Lautenschlager, 
Michelin Tires as usual. 

Second, Benz car, driven by Hemery, 
Michelin Tires as usual. 

Third, Benz car, driven by Hanriot, 
Michelin Tires as usual. 



Michelin Tires not only made a clean sweep as usual, in 
the Voiture or large car race, the 2d day of the World's 
greatest race meet of the year, held by the Automobile 
Club of France, but also scored a complete victory in the 
Voiturette, or small car race held over the same course, on 
the previous day. Michelins were on eight of the first 
ten Voiturettes to finish. 

This again demonstrates Michelin superiority and con- 
tinues our victories in the Elkwood Park meet, the Targo 
Florio, Briarcliff, Savannah, Ormond and Jamaica, where 
Michelins made possible the establishing of more than one 
new World's Record. 



VOITURETTES: 

First., Delage Car. driven by I 

Michelin Tires as usual. 

Second, Sizaire-Naudin, driven by M. Naudin, 
Michelin Tires as usual. 

Third, Lien Car. driven by Goux, 

Michtlin Tires as usual. 

Fourth, Lion Car. driven by Durgerney. 
Michelin Tires as usual. 

Fifth, Delage Car. driven by Thomas, 
Michelin Tires as usual. 



Michelin Tire Co., 

Los Angeles Branch S«n Francisco Branch 

1 20O So. Main St.. 308 Van Ness Ave. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July is, 1908. 



DELIGHTFUL DEL MONTE. 

Special Correspondence. 

The next event of Lnteresl to automobilists on the Del Monte 
calendar is the endurance run of the Dealers' Association to that 
attractive resort on Saturday, July 2f>th. When the cars reach 
Del Monte, those that have perfect scores will make five miles 
around the track at a speed in proportion to the horse-power of 
the ear. A handsome cup will be awarded the successful con- 
testant by the Del Monte Hotel. If the ears arrive at Del Monte 
in time to permit on the afternoon of the 25th, gymkhana games 
will be held : if they arrive too late, the games will take place on 
the following morning in front of the hotel. 

Mrs. E. J. Lawbaugh and Mrs. E. IT. Grubbe were the guests 
of \Y. W. Burton on an automobile trip from Los Angeles to 
San Francisco last week, stopping over at Del Monte en route. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Lyon, Miss Lyon, Miss 1\ itching. Mr, 
and Mrs. A. Hornby, F. C. Hornby and T!. Hornby, all of Red- 
lands, motored to Del Monte last week, and after a day's rest a! 
the hotel continued their trip to Han Francisco. The party re- 
turned to Del Monte on Thursday, the Lyons and Miss Hitch- 
ing spending a Gouple of days before returning t" the Southern 
home, while (lie Tfornbys remained I'm' a fortnight's visit. 

Another party of Southern California people who motored 
from Pasadena tn Del Monte for a Few days" stay included Mr. 
and Mrs. L. J. Merritt, Mr. and Mis. I\. R. Hansen and Roy 
Woodard. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Bartletl and Miss Florence Bartlett, ac- 
companied by Judge L. C. McICerby, made the dip by auto- 
mobile from Los Angeles to Del Monte, arriving at the hold on 
Thursday. 

A party, comprising Mrs. Jewell C. Fuller of Kansas City. 
Mrs. V. W. Strand, nf Stockton, and Arthur Chapman of New 
York, arrived at Del Monte last week in an automobile, and 
spent a few days. 

< !. \ T . Bassett, M. C. Edwards and C. H. Leville, together with 
'I', L Ely and B. A. Nebicker, of Los Angeles, motored from the 
City of Angels, and spent a couple of days at Del Monte last 
week before going on to San Francisco. 

* * * 

While each season's output of Packard motor cars is a definite, 
schedule procedure, entirely independent of any other season, 
(here is no great cessation of work at the factory between sea- 
sons. One department after another picks up the new work, so 
that, as was the ease this year, some departments were working 
on l!)0f) parts, while other departments were still assembling 
19ns ears. Finally the whole force is busy on the new model. It 
is this policy and organization which makes possible such an 
unusual result as the Brst 1909 car being finished practically 
within a month of the completion id' the last 1908 car. 

* • • 

The Auto Manufacturing Co. have opened new quarters at 
105 Golden Gate avenue, where they make a specialty of trim- 
mings for automobiles and carriages, and do all kinds id' trim- 
ming repairing. Automobilists outside of San Francisco may 
send their auto tops which may need attention, or other trim- 
mings or relining, to this establishment, and feel confident that 
their wants will lie well cared for. Anything in the leather line 
will be made to order by this firm and all work guaranteed. 

* * * 

An automobile party at the Peninsula consisted of Mr. Gus 
Holmes, proprietor of the Knutsford, Salt Lake City, Miss 
Holmes and Miss Sutter. After a pleasant visit the party con- 
tinued on to Los Angeles. 



Installation of Magnetos a specialty. 

GEO. H. WOODWARD 

Automobile Machinist* 




44448 FULTON 

St., San Francisco 



TELEPHONE MARKET 1682 















lyyr" i 


£3ff^£lL h^BsaVsafl^H^^KsltaBaBv^f^H^^H IsML^H ' 


PERFECT SCORES 

for two 

Stevens-Duryea Light Sixes 

In the 174 mile Endurance Run of the Automobile Club 
of Hartford, May 16th, over Hartford-Waterbury Route. 
The Touring Car with four passengers averaged 

15 1-7 miles per gallon of gasolene 

WINNING THE GASOLENE CONSUMPTION TEST 
FOR CARS OVER 53000.00 

In Economy, Hill Climblni! and Road Teals STBVENS-DCRi'BA 
GARS are always SUPREME 

PACIFIC MOTOR CAR COMPANY 

376-380 Golden Gate Ave. 
Oakland Branch: 1308-10 Franklin Street. 

Manafaclared by Sterena-Doryca Company, Cbloopea Falls, Mass., 1. S. A. 



ON FILLMORE STREET. 
Jibbs — What are you doing? 
Gribbs — Grafting trees at two bucks per day. 
Jibbs — That ain'i grafting; thafs working. 



AUTOMOBILE AND CARRIAGE 
PAINTING, VARNISHING AND 
TRIMMING. Tops and Seat 
Covers made to order. 

LOCOMOBILE REPAIRING. 
Complete line of Locomobile 
parts. Estimates Given on 
all work. 



The Greenland Co., Inc. 

J. MURRAY PAGE, Mgr. 
Phone Market. 1398 28r Valencia St.. 



IGNITION an( 3 at less expense and inconven- 

TRflllRI F^ > ence to you than at present. Rent 

i nuuDLta your batteries f rom AUT0 ignition CO. 

AVOIDED 709-711 Octavia St., Phone Market 5678. 



.I\ LI 18, L908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



25 



Reeenl i owner of a high-priced ear, a well known San 
Franciscan, undertook a run up into Lake County. He made the 
usual mistake of uot taking care of Ins car as to over-heating the 
engines, with tin- result, that the machine caught Bre in an un- 
frequented section, on a lonely road, far Prom human habitation. 
It was plainly a case of self-ignition, and one thai was covered 
by the policy issued by the Insurance Company of North Amer- 
ica. The owner of the car had allowed his policy to elapse, and, 
of course, lie had uo redress, as the car was a total loss. 'This 
should be a warning to owners of cars to take out their renewals 
immediately, and also to run their ears with a due regard as to 
overheating. No car ean stand overheating. Automobiles an' 
run in endurance contests and races, and the public asks but Ee*Vi 
i|iiestions as to the condition of llic car after the lest is over. No 
private owner is so pressed for time that he has to run his car 
in the same manner as a racer. 

T. S. Lippy of Seattle, famous as one of the lirsl of the Klon- 
dike millionaires, traveled more than two thousand miles across 
the continent to see the Democratic National Convention at 
Denver, lie was accompanied by Mrs. Lippy and three other 
women, a combination which caused one curious man to inquire 
whether his destination were Utah. Besides Mr. and Mrs. Lippy 
and three othe"r women, a combination which caused one curious 
man to inquire whether his destination were Utah. Besides 
Mr. and Mrs. Lippy, the other members of the party were Mrs. 
A. P. Anderson, Miss Mattie Rose and Miss C. Hulse, all of 
Seattle. The parly left Baltimore June 1st in Lippy's six-cylin- 
der Franklin ean, and made the journey by easy stages, arriving 
in Denver just in time for the convention. That over, Lippy de- 
cided to continue his lri|i by rail and shipped the ear to Seattle. 

Mrs. Lippy said that the trip had been one of the most pleas- 
urable of her experience as a motorist. Especially did she en- 
joy the last day's trip, through the mountains from Cheyenne. 
Mrs. Lippy told of many amusing experiences on the way across 
the continent. 

"Somewhere in Nebraska we had to wail at a railroad crossing 
while a through train, which had stopped across I he road, took 
on a diner. One of the passengers saw a joke in the automobile, 
which gave evidences of its long journey, and ils man with four 
women, and called out. to Mr. Lippy: "Say, arc you hound for 
CTtah?' 

"It was certainly a line trip, and 1 think that we women in it 
are the lirsl. to have made the distance in this country. The 

r Is were good almost everywhere except in Iowa, where there 

uas emit iniial rain." 

Lippy is a capitalist, who is well known in the State of Wash- 
ington. He made his fortune in the Klondike dining the lirst 
years of I he "cra/c." 

A Packard Limousine ear id' unusual beaut) ami finish came 
l>\ express this week and was delivered to Mrs. Ethel W. Crocker. 
It is very large, seating the | pie comfortablj inside. The run- 
ning gear is cream yellow, the bodj Kii lielieu blue, and the in- 
terior finish a Royal blue. 



NUF SED 



HOT STUFF 



KEENAN BROS. 

Automobile Engineers, Machinists and Blacksmiths. 
273 Valencia Street, San Francisco. Telephone Market 1985 



TIPS TO AUTOMOBILISTS 



PALO ALTO - Stanford Auto :»n<. Manufacturing Co., renting repairing 
Mid sundries. Flre-prool '■;-:* Emerson 

Street Tel. Main 7 s - Machine and repair department, ">u Alma street. 

SAN JOSE— Lamolle Grill. 86-38 North First street. The best French 
dinner in California, 75c, or a la carte. Automobile parties given par- 
ticular attention. 

SAN JOSE.— WALLACE BROS'. OARAGE, Market and St. Janit-s 

000 square feet of floor space. Special accommodations for 

la. lies. Repairing, sundries, renting. Fire proof garage. Day and night 
servi.e. 

SAN JOSE — Stop at LETCHER'S New Oarage for first-class service. 
Wo cater to the touring public. Attractive parlor for ladies in connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garage next to corner of First and St. James Sts, 

GILROY. CAL — George E. Tiee. general machinist, expert repairing ot 
automobiles and engines a specialty. Day or night service. 260 N Mon- 
terey Street 

FETAl.l M \ - M \i ,: | Machine Works. Any kind of auto 

repairing. Full line oi auto supplies; complete machine shop. Corner 
Third ami C streets. 



SPLITDORF IGNITION 

Do you want to be dead sure that your next trip will 
not be marred by any of those tantalizing ignition 
troubles that form nine-tenths of automobile worry? 

There's a way to do it. 

Use Ignition Apparatus that has been tried in the 
crucible of long and severe use and has made good. 

Such is SPLITDORF IGMTION-used today by 
thousands of autoists in races, pleasure trips and 
contests and proved to be up to the mark in every 
re.pect. 

All summed up in four words— "SPLITDORF IGNI- 
TION-NONE BETTER." 

Ask Dept. A for our new 1908 catalog. 

PACIFIC COAST BRANCH, SPLITDORF 
LABORATORY, 520 Van Ness Avenue, San 
Francisco, Cal. 



Pacific Automobile Exchange 

An original automobile repair and tire insurance. 
The contract supplied by this company for a nominal 
sum per month, guarantees your REPAIR and TIRE 
bills for one year. Your car therefore is necessarily 
kept in perfect running condition. Something new and 
worth while investigating. 



465 Golden Gate Avenue 



Phone Market 1425 



San Francisco 



VULCANIZING 



Davis Bros. 



INCORPORATED 

TIRES RETREADED AND MADE NEW 
Phone Park 710 978 Golden Gate Ave 



V UL C ANIZIN G 

Stevens &. Elkington Rubber Co. 

Sin Francisco. Cal. 



Pbone Franklin 612 

524 Pilk SI. neir Golden Gile Ave. 



Reliance Automobile Co. 

GARAGE, LIVERY AND MACHINE SHOP 



PHONES: 



Park 324 
Park 325 



Fultcn and Octavia 



Thorns! B. Jsfjrrj 8 Company. 117-125 Valencia St., Saa Francisco 



Garage 

Day) 


Phone, 


Market 3337 


Stand Phone. West 7145 
Thompson's Cafe (Night.) 




• 


Thomas 


Flyers 








FOB HIRE AT 


ALL HOURS. 








THE ONLY 6-CYLINDER THOMAS. 




Rapid 


Garage, 


1841 Market St. 


J. E. Neumann 


Manager. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 18, 1908. 



Harry C. Hunt, who is well known as a lively driver of a red 
Franklin runabout, has just returned from Los Angeles, a trip 
that he made, accompanied by Frank Maroney. He reports that 
he made the entire trip without an adjustment to his ear or the 
puncture of a tire. 

The fastest time ever made in an automobile from MeCrav's 
Hotel, Cloverdale, to Bighland Springs, was made in a rope- 
Hartford ear one night last week, the attempt having been 
brought about by a wager. There were a large number of guests 
at this well-known resort, and a driver of unusual experience 
was tempted by a guest to cover this mountainous road at nighi 
in record time. The feat was accomplished and a large number 
of guests were entertained at the expense of the party making 
the wager. 

Arthur Foster took a number of friends on an extended tour 
in his motor car the last of the week. They will visit all the 
popular summer resorts in the southern part of the State before 
returning. Among his guests were Spencer ({rant, Joseph 

Thompson, Moulton Warner and Hubert Mee. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Cuyler Lee, •accompanied by their children, made 
the run to Del Monte, for the holidays over the Fourth, in their 
Packard Thirty. They report one of the finest trips they have 
ever made. 

* * * 

George Aimer Newhall ami wife have returned from a motor 
trip through Lake County, and are most enthusiastic over its 
beauties. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Knight are among those who are enjoy- 
ing the motor car. They are now touring through Lake County 
and the surrounding country. 

* * * 

At a meeting of the Board of Governors of the Automobile 
('lull of California, held on Friday, June 26th, the resignations 
of Mr. R. P. Schwerin, Mr. J. 1). Spreckels, and Mr. Thomas 
Magee, as members of the Board of Governors, were presented 
and accepted. 

In lieu of the above, resigned, Messrs. George A. Newhall, 
C. F. Kohl and Arthur B. Watson were elected as members of 
the Board. 

The Board of Governors, as now constituted, is as follows : 
Messrs. S. G. Buckbee, G. A. Newhall, C. F. Kohl, C. C. Moore, 
A. B. Watson and L. P. Lowe. 

Mr. Samuel G. Buckbee, the acting President of the Club, was 
elected to the office of President, vice Mr. R. P. Schwerin, re- 
signed. 

Mr. George A. Newhall was elected to the office of vice-Presi- 
dent, vice .Mr. .1. 1). Spreckels, resigned. 

Mr. ('. F. Kohl was elected to the office of Treasurer, vice Mr. 
S. <.. Buckbee, resigned. 

Mr. Leslie 10. Burks was elected to the office of Secretary, vice 
Mr. A. J. Frey, resigned. 

Messrs. C. <'. M ■<• and S. (i. Buckbee resigned as members 

of the Executive Committee. To fill the vacancies caused by 



miles is what, a prominent, business man traveled with his car 
equipped with the 



Mjp>ip)D©iiiHi@ifiitoiry Spiral S^srikg 



He further states that they have 
given him no trouble and have 
saved the Tires, the car in general 
and improved the riding 1 00 per 
cent.. 

We will place a set. on your ma- 
chine and if they do not do all 
that, we claim for them, we will 
refund you the money. 



Frank O. Renstrom Company 

424-446 Stanyan St., San Francisco. Phone Park 476 





Murine Eye Tonic 

FOR 

TOURISTS — AUTOISTS 

And Others Requiring a Safe 
and Convenient Package 



No. BB. Heavy Leather Protecting Case Containing 
a Special Size Bottle Murine with Extra Com- 
bination Cork and Pipette, Complete... .One Dollar 



Washington and East Sts. 



Phone Kearny 678 



Ferry Garage Co. 

c/411 Workmanship Guaranteed 



Storage. Renting 



Supplies. Machinist 



"TBE LITTLE STEERSMAN" 

OUR AUTOMATIC STEERING AND SAFETY DEVICE 

Pally and 
broadly 

powerfully E|r* ' ~ 1~*~"^~"^n ^TM I covered by 



Simpla bat 



affective 




patents 
pending 



Insures your safety and your car. Holds the car steady when you 
lose control. Assists the driver at all times. Price S10.00. 

The ABRAMS-MASON CO., Sole Manufacturers, 
Chatham, N. Y. 

CEO. H. WOODWARD, Agent., 444-448 Fulton St. 
San Francisco 



THE PEER OF ALL! 

PLANET OIL COMPANY'S 

TRANSIT AUTOMOBILE OILS 

BASS-HUETER PAINT CO. 

816 Mission Street Distributors 

ADAPTED TO EVERY MACHINE 
Friction Costs more than Lubrication 



July 18, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



27 



these resignations, Messrs. Newhall and Kohl were elected to 
this commit 1 

The executive committee as now constituted is as follows: L. 
P. Lowe, chairman; George \. Newhall and G. P. Kohl. 

The headquarters of the club, formerly in the Flood Building, 
were removed to 626 Pacific Building. 

I mil Further notice, the office of the Secretary will be at No. 
35 Montgomery street, room 101, to which place communica- 
tions to the secretary should be addressed. 

Within the next few days there will he a meeting of (he new 
Hoard of Governors, at which lime the work of the chili will be 
mil lined. 

* * * 

L. L. Burnham has just returned from a trip to Lake County 
in his Thomas-Detroit, and reports that conditions for automo- 
biling are very good there, but some of the roads are very 
crooked. In one place there were forty-two turns in one mile. 
Mr. Burnham was accompanied on his trip by his friend, R. E. 
Smith. 

* * * 

The Pioneer Auto Co. report the sale of a 1908 sixty horse- 
power Thomas to T. Miller, and a Thomas Detroit runabout to 
('. Stovall, of Williams, Cal. 

* * * * 

A lone car against forty-eight competitors— a single repre- 
sentative of the United States — entered in a race where ii is 
conceded that the average speed will he at least sixty-five miles 
an hour. That is what Strang and his Thomas Flyer is to face 
in the Grand Prix race on .Inly 7th. The best drivers of Europe 
in specially built machines, all capable of ninety miles an hour, 
will try ami lower the colors of the old (lag. Yel Strang 
writes: "Barring accidents, the world will know that a Yankee 

was among the racers, and if he didn't win. they had to go some 
to beat him. Every maker hut the Thomas has three cars en- 
tered, hut knowing that it takes hut one good car to win. Roberts 
and I are certainly going to try." 



Phone Franklin 3913 

Up-To-Date Autos 
for hire at all hours 




MAX MAMLOCR 



370 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



1 have unearthed a hunch of Mine Mixer's "philo- 
sophies," of which the ensuing are a sample: 

He who smokes thinks like a philosopher. 

When a man says that he has a wife, he means that a wife has 
him. 

'fell me what you eat, and I will tell you what you are. 

Be good, and you will be lonesome. 

A woman's only a woman, but a good cigar is a smoke. 

Call no man unhappy until he's married. 

To admire, to love, to regret: — is to live. 

Love is the only fire against which there is no insurance. 

Money is the most popular linguist in the world. 

A woman puzzles when she pleases and pleases when she puz- 
zles. 

The white man's wife is his aid, but not his burden. 

Many persons call curiosity love. 

Folks who never do more than they are paid for never get paid 
for more than they do. 

Our arms are a woman's defense; her arms our recompense. 

A pretty woman's smile often leads to serious complications. 

Tim Gravediqger. 



Murine Eye Remedy is a Favorite Toilet Accessory. 

stores Natural Brilliancy to Tired and Faded Eyes. 



Rc- 



Marsh's (formerly of Palace Hotel and Post street) 

have opened at corner of California and Polk street. 




Automobile Excursions h 



SUNDAY 



% 



ROUND TRIP TICKET ~$To~| J() §ffl\ Jq$(> 



Leave Garage, San Francisco, 9 a. m. 
Leave Electric Tower, San Jose, 4 p. m. 

ONLY 7-PASSENGER UP-TO-DATE AUTOS USED 



FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS RING UP 




M A M L O C K 



v. 



Phone Franklin 2913 
370 Golden Gate Avenue 



J 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 18, 190S. 



iExplottttty % Mxms of ICuzon- A ^ktnmslj in % Jnormt? a (Eoimtrg 

By E. JDDSON AND J. LEE IN (JUNE) OVERLAND MONTHLY. 




IVING IN the Philip- 
pine Islands, particu- 
larly in the districts 
outside of the pictur- 
esque old walled city 
of Manila, cannot be 
called a continual 
round of pleasure. 
As the nights in the Philippines are the 
most delightful hours of the twenty-four, 
in the cities the going down of the sun 
is the signal for beginning all kinds of 
revelry. All Manila enters its carriages 
and drives to the Luneta, where they drive 
or recline on the soft sward and listen for 
hours to the bands of the various regi- 
ments and the Manila band. 

But for diversity of experiences, and a 
melange of pathos, comedy and tragedy, 
the isles of the Orient certainly furnish 
their share. 

Shortly after the occupation of the 
walled city by Americans, the writer was 
given a position in the islands, and left 
San Francisco on the transport Hancock 
to take up his duties at Malate, a suburb 
of Manila, in charge of the Mining Bu- 
reau for the Government. 

When the Spanish owned and occupied 
the islands, they had given important con- 
cessions to a number of German residents 
of the islands for the mining of gold in 
Northern Luzon, embracing territory in 
the provinces of Benguet, Lepanto, Illi- 
cost and Illocos Norte, along the valley of 



the Agno river, covering a territory of 
some two hundred miles. 

Enquiry made at the Bank of Shang- 
hai and Hong-Kong, and located on the 
Escolta in Binondo — the commercial por- 
tion of Manila lying across the Pasig river 
from the walled city, and reached from 
that city by the really magnificent Puenta 
de Espana. or Bridge of Spain — revealed 
the fact that during the past ten years 
something like five and one-half million 
dollars had been paid by that bank to 
German mine owners for the product of 
their mines. 

The laborers in these mines were Igor- 
rotes, and their wives and children — not 
the head-hunter branch of this tribe, but 
the dwellers on the plains west of the 
mountains which the head-hunters in- 
habit. Their method of mining was. and 
still is, very crude. There are several 
very rich veins of white, honeycombed 
quartz, decomposed at the surface and eas- 
ily extracted by the use of short iron crow- 
bars, and ground by the use of the old- 
fashioned Mexican metale, consisting of n 
large flat stone on which the rotten quartz 
is spread, and which is reduced to powder 
by being rolled under a round stone and 
then washed in wooden calabashes, after 
the manner of panning in the old '49 days 
in California. 

While this gold goes about $20 to the 
ounce, the banks only allowed the miners 
$11 per ounce, but as the owners of thes.' 



mines paid their laborers in hard tack, 
salt fish and tobacco, nearly all they re- 
ceived for their gold was profit. 

In the spring of 1900 the writer was de- 
tailed by General Otis — then Governor- 
General of the Islands — to take a squad 
of twenty men, whom he was allowed to 
select from ex-volunteers whose terms of 
enlistment had expired and who had 
taken up their residence 'in Manila, and 
proceed by train to Dagupan, and thence 
penetrate the interior eastward to the Ag- 
no river, thence proceed along the course 
of the river through the provinces of Ben- 
quet, Lepanto, Illicos and Illocos Norte 
to its source, and thence to Vigan on the 
west coast of Luzon. The purpose of this 
trip was to map out for the Government 
the mining claims conceded to the Ger- 
mans by the Spanish Government, which 
concessions had been abrogated by the 
American Government, and because of 
which the German mine owners had 
brought suits against this Government in 
the Supreme Court of Manila. 

Leaving Manila, the little party pro- 
ceeded to Dagupan, where General Young 
furnished them an escort to Bernal, a 
small barrio some twenty miles east of the 
coast city, and a food supply to last them 
until they struck the Agno river some 
sixty miles further in the interior. 

The hike to the Agno proved unevent- 
ful, no insurrectos having troubled that 
part of the island for two months past, 



BANKING 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 



With which are amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia, the Halifax 
Banking Co. and the Merchants' Bank of Prince Edward Island. 
HEAD OFFICE— TORONTO. 

Paid-up Capital $10,000,000 Reserve Fund $5,000,000 

Aggregate Resources, over $113,000,000. 

B. E. WALKER. President ALEX. LAIRD. General Manager. 

LONDON OFFICE — 2 Lombard St., E. C. 

NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 

BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlin, Cranbrook, Fernie, 
Greenwood, Kamloops, Ladysmith, Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster. 
Penticton, Prince Rupert, Princeton, Vancouver (3), and Victoria. 

YUKON TERRITORY — Dawson and White Horse. 

UNITED STATES— Portland, Seattle and Skagway (Alaska). 

OTHER BRANCHES— Alberta, 26; Saskatchewan, 18; Manitoba, 20; 
Ontario and Quebec. 62; Maritime Provinces, 19. 

BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England. The Bank of Scot- 
land, Lloyd's Bank, Ltd., The Union of London, and Smith's Bank, Ltd. 

AGENTS IN CHICAGO — The First National Bank. 

AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS — The Commercial National Bank. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Main Office. 325 California St. Branch— Cor. Van 
Ness and Eddy. 
A. KAINS. Manager. BRUCE HEATHCOTE. . Asst. Manager. 

The German Savings &, Lean Society 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1.453,983.62 

Deposits, June 30, 1908 34,471,554.23 

Total Assets 37.066.263.31 

Remittances may be made by draft, post-office, or Wells, Fargo & 
Co.'s money orders, or coin by express. 

Office Hours — 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock p. m., except Saturdays to 
12 o'clock M. and Saturday evenings from 7 o'clock p. m. to 8 o'clock 
p. m. for receipt of deposits only. 

OFFICERS— President, N. Ohlandt; First Vice-Presidcmt, Daniel 
Meyer; Second Vice-President, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; 
Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary. George Tourny; 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Goodfellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS — N. Ohlandt. Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte. 
Ign. Steinhart, I. N. Walter, I. W. Van Bergen, F. Tillmann, Jr., E. T. 
Kruse and W. S. Goodfellow. 



The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 



Head Office — 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 
Capital Authorized, $6,000,000. Paid-up. $1,600,000 

Subscribed. $3,000,000 Reserve Fund, $700,000 

This bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout 
the world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells ex- 
change and bullion. 
IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LILIENTHAL, Managers. 

J. FRIEDLANDER, Cashier. 



London, Paris and American Bank, Ltd. 



N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Streets. 
Subscribed Capital, $2,500,000. Paid-up Capital, $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $1,200,000. 
Head Office — 40 Threadneedle St., London. E. C. 
AGENTS — New York — Agency of the London, Paris and American 
Bank. Limited. No. 10 Wall street, N. Y. ; Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres 
& Cie. 17 Boulevard Polssonler. Draw direct on the principal cities of 
the world. Commercial and Travelers' credits Issued. 
S. GREENEBAUM, H. FLEISHHACKER, Managers. 

R. ALTSCHUL. Cashier. 



Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 



Building at 706 Market Street. Opposite Third. 
Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000. Paid-up capital and surplus, $620,000 

James D. Phelan. President; John A. Hooper, First Vice-President; 
James K. Moffltt, Second Vice President; George A. Story. Cashier; C. 
B. Hobson. Assistant Cashier; A. E. Curtis. Second Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan, John A. Hooper. J. K. Moffltt, Frank 
J. Sullivan, Rudolph Spreckels, R. D. McElroy, Charles Holbrook, J. C. 
McKinstry. Rolla V. Watt. 

This bank does a savings business exclusively, paying interest on all 
deposits. One dollar will open an account, and remittances can be sent 
by Express, Post-Offlce order or check. Write for particulars. 

Hours — 10 to 3 p. m.; Saturdays. 10 to 12 m.; Saturday evenings, for de- 
posits only, 6:30 to 8 p. m. 



Central Trust Company of California 

42 Montgomery St. Branches: 3039 16th St.; 624 Van Ness Avenue. 

Accounts of Individuals, Firms, Corporations, Unions, Societies 
solicited. Interest paid on Savings Accounts. Drafts sold on all 
parts of the world. 

Capital paid In, $1,600,000 Resources, $6, 025, 939. 09 

B. G. TOGNAZZI, Manager. 



July 18, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



29 



and tlic river was reached al nigh* fall of 
the fourth day after leaving Dagupan. 
Here the scenery was wonderful to the 
unaccustomed dwellers of the Occident. 

Immense tracts of mammoth bamboo, al- 
most impossible to penetrate without the 
constant use of the native bolo — a Short, 
heavy sword, used in times of peace for 
cutting bamboo and sugar cane, and dur- 
ing the insurrection, for decapitating 
American soldiers — were traversed. Giant 
royal palms, fruit-laden mangoes, stately 
mahogany and ora, the latter resembling 
ebony except for being a slightly lighter 
shade, and from which the floors of the 
wealthy residents of Manila, of the cathed- 
rals and public buildings, are made, the 
wood taking a very high degree of polish 
and lasting almost indefinitely; the deli- 
cate pina, from the fibre of which the 
dainty, expensive cloths of the richer na- 
tive is woven ; and a thousand varieties 
of vines, lichens, ferns and flowers were 
interwoven and scattered prodigally 
among the forests which were penetrated 
before reaching the river. 

Camp fires were lighted, coffee boiling 
and supper spread on the river bank for 
the score of hungry travelers, and when 
night fell, four men were detailed as 
guards until midnight, when they were to 
be relieved until morning. 

In the mountain camp the air is some- 
what cooler than in Manila, the moon 
shines as bright as a newly minted double- 
eagle, the lights and shadows are as clear 
cut as a cameo. The slowly waving palms 
weave shadows of a thousand fantastic 
shapes on the white sand, while the glow- 
ing moonlight frosts the crystal waters of 
the river until it dances and whirls and 
splashes its banks like a flood of molten 
silver, sweeping between banks of snow. 

Morning came, and with it came the 
Igorrote women laden with baskets of 
tarro, mangoes, sapodillas, bananas, plan- 
tain and cocoanuts, which they offered in 
exchange for tobacco and rum. The for- 
mer luxury was given them, hut the latter 
had not been made a part of the outfit of 
the surveying party, except a small quan- 
tity of liquor for use in case of medical 
necessity. 

These Igorrote women, in their native 



ZEROLENE 


An Absolutely Non-Carbonizing Oil 

Zerolene, the new non-carbonizing oil, ends all the troubles of carbon and 
friction in gasoline engine lubrication. Gives perfect lubrication in any gaso- 
line engine, regardless of type. This oil is produced in only one place. 

ZEROLENE Lubricating OIL 

leaves practically no carbon deposit. Completely eliminates all trouble from choked 
up spark plugs and "works" with absolute uniformity under all conditions. Put up in 
sealed cans with patent spout that prevents can^being refilled. Remember the label 
shown in cut, and the non-refilling feature which prevents substitution of inferior oils. 
ZiiROLENE is also put up iu barrels for the garage trade. Sold by dealers everywhere. 

STANDARD OIL COMPANY 

(Incorporated) 


po^OMOBItOTftWlOKj 


ZERO COLD TE5T 



costume, which consisted of a piece of 
cloth wound around the hips and extend- 
ing nearly to the knees, were anything but 
inviting specimens of their race, but they, 
as well as the men, were friendly to 
Americans and displayed this friendship 
constantly throughout the hard hike up 
the Agno river, and on more than one oc- 
casion their timely warning of the ap- 
proach of renegadoes saved the little band 
from ambush, if indeed not from annihila- 
tion. 

The third day after starting up the 
river, the first location was encountered, 
and here it was found the river cross-cut 
a ledge about five feet in width, in the 
croppings of which long trenches some ten 
feet deep had been dug, and the decom- 
posed ore extracted and washed for its 
rich values, some of this ore going as high 
as $(5,000 a -ton. Here the party found 
four Igorrote women extracting the gold 
by means of a peculiar sluice, which was 
made by splitting a large bamboo in 
halves and using for riffles, flat stones, 
which caught a small percentage of the 
gold, the larger part going over or around 
the stones and on into the river. They 
showed the writer a pig-skin sack contain- 
ing fully two pounds of the rich yellow 
metal which they had taken from their 
i rude aluices during the three days they 
had worked at this point, and offered it 
for sale for tobacco and rum. A trade 
was finally made for ten plugs of tobaceo. 
ten Backs of Durham smoking and five 



dollars in small Philippine coin, the wo- 
men refusing to accept a five dollar gold 
piece, never having seen one before, and 
not knowing what it was, nor its value. 

The journey through Benguet province 
was, for the most part, uneventful in so 
far as trouble with insurrectos was con- 
cerned, but on entering Lapanto province 
the real trouble began. 

Guards were detailed every night, and 
the blue striped shirts and black faces of 
insurrecto scouts began to flit from tree 
to tree, while the frequent crack of a 
Mauser and sharp buzz of bullets made 
things more interesting for the little party 
of Americans. 

The policy of the American Govern- 
ment had been, and still is, that in the 
event of a defeated body of insurrectos 
throwing down their arms and yelling 
"amigo," they were to be permitted to 
pass through the ranks to the rear of the 
soldiers, and be admitted to parole on 
their promise not to engage further in 
hostilities. But the result of this so- 
called humane mode of treatment ac- 
corded this people was discouraging to the 
officers in charge of hostilities, resulting 
as it invariably did in the breaking of 
paroles, the renewing of hostilities anil 
frequent attacks from the rear by these 
parolled "amigos." who are absolutely 
without the il gratitude or honor 

in even the slightest degree. Hence, when 
our little squad was attacked on the tenth 
day after starting up the river, by a party 



Charles Lyons 

LONDON TAILOR. 

KSTARMSIIKD 80 VKARS 

Importer and Dealer in Foreign «nd Domestic Woolens 

Suits to order from $25.00 up 

Overcoats $25.00 " 

Trousers $ 6-00 " 

14.12 Fillmore St, 131 Van Ness Ave., 771 Market St. San Francisco 
958 Broadway, Oakland 




H. Bette 

1 163 ELLIS STREET, S. F. 

Formerly 424 Sutter Street. 



Importer gf Fine Novelties, rJTVIaker of Ladies' 
Tailored Suits, Riding Habits a Specialty. 



White Diamond Water Go. 



PCRE WATER FOR OAM AND 

ALAMEDA 

(incorporated BBRKELBY 



An Absolutely Sanitary Water. neither Boiled. Distilled nor Chemically Treated. 
batBacttrlotoetullyPi = tallow DELIVERED FRESH 

EACH WEEK. $1. sov 5««Ho«b»«* 

I'Hones PMBDMONT ITM AND HI 



NO. 1 TBLBGRAPH AVE. 



OAKLAND. CAL. 



Jefferson Square Bowling Alleys 
» nJ Billiard and Pool Parlors 

l DEN GATE AVE. CORNER OCTAVIA 

LARGEST AND FINEST IN THE WORLD 



30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 18, 1908. 



nf nearly twice our number, who rushed 
down from the forest while we were eat- 
ing dinner, the order was given as each 
man grabbed his Krag to "shoot to kill, 
and kill them all." This order was car- 
ried out literally as long as there was an 
insurrecto in sight, which was not over 
five minutes, for they were so close when 
the first shot was fired that they dropped 
like grass-hoppers after the first hard 
frost, and being armed only with bolos, 
they had depended on surprising us and 
cutting us down before we could bring our 
guns into action. 

Skirmishes now became quite frequent, 
but the "little brown brothers" became 
more careful in their attacks, attempting 
to make use of ambushes more often than 
an attack in the open, for our methods 
differed from the soldiers in that we shot 
first and talked afterwards. 

Leaving Lepanto province, we entered 
into Ulocos, the most beautifully pictur- 
esque country we had yet seen. The fol- 
iage was luxuriant, giant banyan, srace- 
ful rubber trees, long beard-like masses of 
mosses suspended from their branches, 
flowers of every hue of the rainbow, ferns 
six and eight feet in height, mosses as 
thick and soft as a velvet carpet, fruits of 
a dozen varieties, and long stretches of 
waving blue grass higher than one's head, 
along the river side, reminding one of our 
Kentucky boys of the long, billowy 
meadow lands of his fair native State. 

Here the character of the ore deposits 
also changed, the gold ore disappearing 
and giving place -to granite and spar, 
carrying high values in native copper 
and black oxide of copper mixed 
with sulphides in the spar. The writer 
dug into a part of an immense ledge where 
the capping had been eroded by atmos- 
pheric action, and extracted a piece of 
pure native copper about three feet in 
length and from a quarter to a half inch 
in thickness, besides several pieces of na- 
tive copper from the size of a pea to that 
of a marble. One piece of ore we'ighing 
some fifty pounds was broken in two 
pieces which hung together with wire cop- 
per running through it. 

As the river here is some eight feet 
wide and from two to fifteen feet deep, 



with a fall of about two hundred feet to 
the mile, it is safe to predict that when 
the mining laws of the islands have been 
finally settled, and the Government per- 
mits locations to be taken up, there will 
be some magnificent producers of high- 
grade gold and copper opened up in the 
island of Luzon. 

One day, three months after we left 
Manila, three Igorrotes came swiftly out 
of the forest and rushed up to the writer, 
as the leader of our little band, and in 
broken Spanish said : "Insurrectos, senor, 
many, many, no got guns, got plenty 
bolos, white man chief, you run queek. We 
show you." 

It is needless to say that an outfit was 
never packed in shorter time than we 
cinched our lay-out onto our little pack 
animals and started across the Agno in 
the wake of our guides. Half an hour's 
run brought us to an old, dismantled Jes- 
uit church, the rear wall and sides of 
which were a part of the solid rock of the 
mountain into which it was hewn, the 
front being rock plastered with adobe, 
and inside on the ground lay an immense 
wooden door. We drove our pack animals 
inside and followed them, raising the door 
to its place and barricading it with big 
rocks. 

At the side of the room we found a post 
leading to the upper story, knotehed on 
either side to assist the climber, and up 
this novel staircase we went to the bam- 
boo floored second story, where two wide 
open windows with casing some three feet 
from the floor enabled us to look down 
the valley whence our pursuers must come. 

In about half an hour we caught sight 
of them, and a few moments later we 
counted one hundred and ten of the little 
brown, half starved looking "amigos" 
emerge from the chaparral, led by a fine- 
looking, stalwart, white man, who was 
the only possessor of fire arms, consisting 
of two six-shooters swung on either hip; 
these, with a sword, completed his equip- 
ment, while his followers were armed only 
with bolos of varied lengths and sizes. 

He stood for a moment peering around 
under the burning sunlight , and then 
catching sight of our boys watching him, 
darted back into the shelter of the trees. 



A few moments later we saw a white rag 
attached to a stick waving near the tree 
behind which he had taken refuge. I 
yelled in Spanish for him to come on. The 
officer and one of his men stepped slowly 
from the shelter of the trees, and waved 
the white flag again, and again I called to 
him to advance, that we would not fire 
upon them, and they came slowly toward 
our retreat. 

When within about fifty yards they 
stopped, and the white man called out in 
good English, with a slight German ac- 
cent: 

"Who are you, and what are you doing 
up here?" 

I replied : "We are employees of the 
United States Government engaged in 
mapping out the mines of the island, for 
the purpose of knowing their location and 
comparative value in case the former Ger- 
man owners bring suit to recover their 
former Spanish concessions." 

This statement acted on the officer like 
shaking a red flag at a mad bull, and he 
fairly foamed at the mouth as he de- 
manded our immediate surrender. 

I (though not intending for a moment 
to surrender) asked: "What terms will 
you give us ?" and he said : "All we want 
is your guns and ammunition, and you 
can go to the devil for all I care." 

"You see it is near night-fall," I tem- 
porized. "You must give us until morn- 
ing for our ultimatum ; we would not care 
to be turned loose in this strange coun- 
try, unarmed, in the night time." 

This seemed to strike the leader of the 
insurrectos as fair, and he said : "I will 
give you until morning to decide what 
you'll do." 

He returned to the chapparal, and was 
so sure, evidently, of our being "scared 
up" at their numbers, that he marched 
his men out and made camp at a distance 
of not over one hundred and fifty yards 
in front of our stronghold. 

I placed guards at the windows for the 
night and told them to awaken me at the 
first break of dawn. This they did, and 
I rounded up the boys, and we agreed that 
a fisht was the only thing left for us if we 
wanted to save our heads. I posted half 
of the men at one window' and half at 



FIRE MARINE AUTOMOBILE 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 



CAPITAL, $1,600,000 



ASSETS, $6,000,000 



CALIFORNIA AND SANSOME STREETS 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Cash Capital, $200,000. 



Cash Assets, I(»l,377.»> 



Pacific Coast Gasualty Co. 

OF CALIFORNIA. 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, Elevators, Workmen'! 
Collective, Vessels, Burglary, Plate Glass Insurance. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; John C. Coleman, Vlce-Preal- 
dent; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant Borel & Co., Treasurers; F. P. Deerlng, 
Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, H. E. Bothin, Edward L. Brayion, John C. CoU- 
man, F. P. Deerlng, E. F. Green, James K. Moffltt, Henry Rosenfeld, 
Adolph A. Son, William S. Tevis. 

Head Office — Merchants Exchange Building, San Francisco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company, General Agents for California, Kohl Building, San 
Francisco. 



The Connecticut Fire Insurance Co. 

Of Hartford. Established 18(0. 

Capital 11,000,000.0(1 

Total Assets (.721,418.01 

Surplus to Policyholders 2,2(2,116.00 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL BUILDING 
BENJAMIN J. SMITH, MANAGER. 



British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co., Ltd. 

Of Liverpool. 

Capital M.700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE A CO., Agei**« 
3 ao SANSOME STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year emlins June 30, 1908. a dividend lias been declared at 

the rate of 4 per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, payable 

on and after Wednesday, July 1, 1008. Dividends not called for are added 

to and bear the same rate of interest as the principal from July 1. 1908. 

WM. A. BOSTON. Cashier. 
Office — 101 Montgomery street, corner Sutter street, San Francisco. 



July 18, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



31 



the other, and said to one of my men, 
an old Montana prospector and dead shot : 
"Doc., you and I will put the first shot 
into the carcass of that white officer, then 
pick the rest off as fast as we can until 
they make the trees." 1 instructed the 
boys to single out three men apiece and ■ 
then notified the white man I would not 
surrender. 

One of the characteristics of the Fili- 
pino soldiers and officers is to insist on 
eating and smoking a cigarette before 
they will commence to fight, and relying 
on this, we waited patiently until they 
were all grouped around a dozen or more 
fires eating their scanty meal of rice and 
coffee. Then I gave the word, and the 
first to leap in the air, twist and fall in 
a crumpled mass was the white officer. 
Old Doc, kept on pouring the bullets into 
the now demoralized and retreating 
brownies, while between his clenched teeth 
he muttered: "Bet you a plug I got him 
in the left eye," not looking, however, in 
my direction, but cracking away at the 
disappearing bob men, nearly half of 
whose number lay around the fires or 
crawled, dragging a broken leg or arm, 
toward a place of safety. 

Did you ever know that men go blood- 
crazy during a fight? Well, it's true. All 
the brute in a man, be he the ignorant, 
brutalized product of the gutter, or the 
cultured, educated scion of a race of 
generations of the nobility — the blood of 



the old cave-men throws a red mist across 
the lapse of ages and the thirst for com- 
bat, the blood-call, springs into a devour- 
ing' flame, and gamin and student, side 
by side, rush into the midst of the fray, 
shooting, stabbing, cursing, and for the 
time being, wild beasts, seeking what they 
may devour. Thus the red flame kindled 
in the breasts of half of our squad, and 
down the ladder we went, and throwing 
the door to one side, rushed madly out 
toward the forest where the uninjured 
and wounded had taken refuge. 

I had sent two shots in the direction of 
a couple of fleeing insurrectos, when my 
friend, Doc, yelled: "Look out, Frank!" 
T caught the gleam of a bolo descending 
just in time to throw up an arm and catch 
a nasty cut across the elbow. Doc dropped 
my man and dragged me back from the 
chapparal and toward the old church. The 
wound was soon dressed with our first re- 
lief bandages, and I recalled our men with 
a whistle I used for that purpose, and 
we were soon ready to resume our jour- 
ney to the north. 

Before leaving, however, we stripped 
the clothing from the white leader of the 
insurrectos, and found on the under- 
clothing a coat of arms worked, evidently 
by some woman's hand in far-off Ger- 
many, and I thought with one of our 
Generals that "War is hell!" for doubt- 
less some sweet-faced girl was waiting to 
hear from her handsome lover who had 



cast his lot with these insurrectos, and she 
mhi-i si] perhaps For years waitng for 
Bome word Erom the Ear-off islands of the 
Orient and that word would never come, 
and her life, perhaps, would be lived out 
alone, not knowing ns to the Eate of her 
lover, not knowing whether he were dead 
or unfaithful, never knowing the truth 
until the last trump should call the dead 
to life; but perhaps in the eternity she 
might learn the truth. We dug a grave, 
cut on a piece of pine board taken from 
one of our canned tomato boxes, the date 
of his death and a facsimile of his coat 
of arms, and left him to his last long 
sleep. 

During the remainder of our tramp we 
were not again molested. After finishing 
the examination of the country bordering 
the Agno river, which we found rich in 
minerals, dye woods, valuable timber and 
thousands of acres of the richest kind of 
soil for agriculture, we arrived, a ragged, 
dirty, wiser and sadder, but healthy 
lot, at Vigan. From this point, we 
took a coaster for Manila, reaphing the 
capital just seven months from the date 
of our departure, having located, mapped 
and examined over one hundred former 
concessions on the Agno river, and placed 
in the Hands of the Government sufficient 
data to enable them to defend successfully 
any action which the owners under Span- 
ish rule may bring against the United 
States. 



Fairmont, 
Hotel 






A good place to entertain or to be enter- 
tained in either simple or elaborate fashion. 



PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 



There are two periods in a man's life when he is unable* 

lo understand women — before marriage and after. 



DON'T FORGET IT! 

Cafe Madden 

236-240 Turk Street,, San Francisco 

Madden s will be the most beautiful dining place ever 
seen in the West. It will seat one thousand people, 
and embody all the latest features in decorative and 
culinary art. 

NOW OPEN 

Under the Management of JOHN A. MADDEN 
Pormerlj wlttl the Paface and St. Francis Hotels 



Old Poodle Dog Restaurant 

S24-82e Eddy St., near Van Nets Ave. Formerly at Buah St.. 
cor. Grant Avenue. Phone Franklin 63. 



With all the cTy for retrenchment and the call of hard 

times thai conies Erom the East, there is the asual ml of 

summer travel in California; the tide to the si ter resorts lias 

not slopped, and the season bids fair to be longer and more than 
usually prosperous. Trade is not any worse than il was Last 
year .it this time, and real estate transactions are much more 
numerous. Country real estate and suburban home sites are 
in demand. The real sting of the stringency has nol hit San 
Francisco or California. 



gOL 


New 






wA 


Poodle 






m^*-^£r 


Dog 






iBgf-'-'^ ? 


Restaurant 




W^L 


and 






f&m 


Hotel 


N. W. Corner 

Polk 8 Post 


• 

Sts. 


V S^^^W, 


Phone 


San Franclico 






Franklin 2960 







Thompson's 
Annex 



40c 



SERVE AN 

IDEAL 
LUNCHEON 
Farrell near Fillmore 



32- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEB 



.Iijly 18, 1908. 



FATE. 

If thou doesf bid thy friend farewell. 

But for one night, though, that farewell may be, 

Press thou his hand in thine. 

How ean'st thou tell how far from thee 

Fate or caprice may lead his steps ere that to-morrow comes? 

Men have been known to lightly turn the corner of a street, 

And the days have grown to months, and months have grown ! 

lagging years. 
Ere they have looked in loving eyes again. 
Parting at best is underlaid with tears and pain. 
Therefore, lest sudden death should come between, 
Or time or distance, clasp with pressure firm 
The hand of him who goeth forth. 
Unseen, Fate goeth, too. 

Yes. find thou always time to say some earnest word 
Between the idle talk. 
Lest with thee henceforth, nighl and day. 
Regret should walk. 

— Coventry Paijnorc. 



The new Japanese rooms (Marsh's) with rare, high Jap- 
anese art exhibit, are now open in the Fairmont Hotel. 




JULY 

THE MATCHLESS MONTH AT 

Hotel Del Monte 

Golf, Motoring, Sailing, Fishing, Bathing, 
Riding. Low Hotel rates S3 to S5.50 
per day American plan. Make your res- 
ervations NOW. 

H. R. WARNER, 

Manager Del Monte 

or 789 Market Street, San Francisco. 



Hotel Westminster 



Los Angeles, Cal. 

Fourth and Mam Sis. 



American Plan 

REOPENED 

Rates Per Day, $2.50 Rooms without Bath 
Rooms with Bath $3.00, $3.50 and $4.00 

European Plan 

SI. 00 per day and up 
With bath *1. SO anup 

F. O. JOHNSON, Proprietor 



Hotel St>. James 



OPPOSITE ST. JAMES PARK 

SAN JOSE 

Recognized headquarters for automobile parties. 

ALBERT BETTENS. Prop. R. M. BETTENS. Mur. 



St*. Sauveur Apartments 

1276 JONES, S. E.COR. CLAY STREET.Marine view, 
4 and 5 room flats. Every convenience. 
WOLF & HOLLMAN, Agents, 327 Kearny St. 



GILROY HOT SPRINGS 

OPEN THE YEAR ROUND. 

ACCESSIBILITY.— The keynote to our success. Only 4 hours 
from San Francisco, including delightful stage ride over the best 
kept mountain road in California. Unsurpassed table, superb ser- 
vice, health-healing waters, telephone, post-office, ideal climate. 

The waters contain sulphur, alum, iron, soda, magnesia, iodine 
and traces of arsenic, and are very efficacious in cures of rheuma- 
tism, neuralgia, rheumatic gout, kidney and liver diseases, lead 
and mercurial poisoning, and all bladder and urinary complaints. 
Hunting and trout fishing. Rates $12 to $17.50 a week; baths free. 
Trains leave Third and Townsend streets at 9 a. m. Direct stage 
connection. Send for booklet or see Peck-Judah, 789 Market St. 

W. J. McDONALD, Proprietor. 



SUMMER AT 



Pizmo Beach 



On, the Coast; 



"NOT AN IDLE MINUTE." 
Hold your conventions and club outings at Pizmo! 
You can live at the Inn for $2.50 per day. Special weekly and 
monthly rates. 

Elegantly furnished Tents in Tent-city for $6.00 per week for two. 

Fishing, Boating, Bathing, Autoing, Bowling, Tennis, Horseback 
Riding through the mountains; Clam Digging. 

Two large bathing pavilions, with warm plunge. 

The beach at Pizmo is one-quarter of a mile wide, and seventeen 
miles long. And is noted among the autoists as the Ormond of the 
West. 

Ask any Southern Pacific agent about summer excursion rates, 
or write Pizmo Beach Resort, 789 Market street. 



SANTA CR.UZ 



THE WORLD'S MOST BEAUTIFUL PLAYGROUND 



ELECTRIC ILLUMINATIONS, THE FAMOUS CASINO GRILL, FIREWORKS 
from the Big Ship BALBOA. 

Two Big Famous Brass Bands, Orchestras, Etc. The Famous Big 
Trees, Scenic Mountains. 

Largest and most magnificent Casino and Natatorium. Climate with- 
out an Equal. 



NEVER A DULL MOMENT FROM JUNE 20th 
TO OCTOBER 1st, 



Lake County, 

California 



Anderson Springs 

The greatest resort for health and pleasure; the only natural 
mineral steam baths in Lake County. Natural Hot Sulphur and 
Iron Baths. Buard — $10 to $14 per week. No extra charge for 
baths. How to reach the Springs— Take Oakland ferry at 7:::" 
a. in., or Steamer Monti cello, and Napa Valley Electric H. R. to 
St. Helena, auto stage to springs, tare $6.55, arrive 12.30 for lunch. 
or S. P. train li> Calistoga, arrive 11.80 for lunch; Spiers stage to 

springs; fare $6.80; arrive al Anderson Springs at i p. m., distance 

21 miles. Fare. $7 round trip from San Francisco, Address all 

communications to J. ANDERSON, Anderson Springs, Middletown, 
Lake County, Cal. 



Mt. Tamalpais «* Muir Woods 

TWO TRIPS, entirely different. To the summit of a high mountain; 
to the heart of a great forest. Trees 18 feet in diameter, 200 feet high. 



"TAVERN OF TAMALPAIS" 

At the Summit 



and 



"Muir Tav«rn" 
In the Woods 



Via Sausalito Ferry, foot of Market Street. See San Franciscodaily papers for 
Time Card. 




gAsa ? *^!*®>®e© 




(&%lifttxvtm%b i &txtx %tx. 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 

The News Letter Is a member California Periodical Publishers' Association. 



VOL. LXXVI 



San Francisco, CaL, Saturday, July 25, 1908 



No. 4 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 773 Market St.. San Francisco. Cal. Tel. Temporary 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco. Cal . Post-office as second-class mall matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London office — 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. George Street & Co. 

All social Items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter Intended for publication in 
the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 

The most provincial citv in the United States is New 

York. 

The most cosmopolitan city in the United States is New 

Orleans. 

The most enjoyable, best situated and fastest-growing city 

in the United States is San Francisco. 

With the nomination of Taft, the railroads and factories 

began running full time again. 

The sale of $17,000,000 worth of Central Pacific bonds 

indicates the return of good times. 

It looks as if the gifts of the Greeks would roost as 

curses on the Ruef. 

Governor Hughes will lire the opening gun of the cam- 
paign for Taft in New York on September 6th. 

The Western Federation of Miners is .(insistent, if noth- 
ing more. They have re-elected Mover, of unsavory fame, to the 
Presidency. 

The campaign to eliminate the cur dog has commenced. 

Let the good work go on. Pound-masters are getting busy all 
around the bay. 

The name of Van Kensselaer is being dipped in the mud 

of scandal. II is one of the prerogatives of aristocracy to Hreed 
degenerate sons. 

The week has gone by, and Mrs. Longworth has done 

nothing scandalous or outrageous. People are becoming alarmed 
lest she may be ill. 

The two brokers who stole the names oi the Nal C. Good- 
win Company stole trash. Bice and Goodwin uever owned any- 
thing that was not trash. 

That Asiatic turn of mind possessed by the curly boss has 

finally given him B dime novel twist that seems likely to land 
him in the penitentiary for life. 

(Jumpers and his aides will know a great deal more about 

injunctions than they do now when they gel through with the 
Supreme Court at Washington in the BUCK store cases. 

Bryan has suddenly discovered that the celebrated anti- 
injunction plank is worthless, and is worried. We said last • 
that the past meant nothing: it is the future that is fearful. 

——The (Hidden tour man has organized a company to 
navigate the air. The press despatches say it is to be an "air 
line" niostlv hot air. 

Colonel .lames Hamilton Lewis threatens to take off 

his whiskers. Do not do it. J. Ham. There would not lie enough 
OU left for identification purposes. 

Colonel Harvey, of Harper's Weekly, pays the West the 

tribute of being "broader minded" than the East Really, 

Colonel, the Wr"fl8t, without any undue display of egotism, dis- 

some fifty You're behind the pro- 

iion. 



The indiscriminate burning of trees in Trinity County 

should be put a stop to at once. 

Senator Perkins and Dr. Buckley should be enticed to 

a vacant lot and each given hi's favorite weapon. Dr. Buckley 
might wield a syringe, and the Senator a "Cubeean" bolo. 

The Old Age Pension bill has become a law in England. 

This is as it should be, and some such bill, patterned after the 
New Zealand old age measure should be adopted by this country. 

The unanimous inability of the police to capture any one 

unless the culprit runs into their arms is phenomenal. It is 
suspected that "Felix" and Pete "Claude" have joined Det- 
weiler. 

The Graft Prosecution has finally emerged, and is show- 
ing itself in its true colors as a big business and political aggre- 
gation organized to prosper the schemes of Rudolph Spreckels 
and company. 

Should the police of the bay cities succeed in capturing 

the murderer of Bangs, the Borax Works watchman, they will 
have in a measure retrieved their very evident incapacity in a 
hundred other directions. 

The publication by rival newspapers of every step taken 

by the authorities in their efforts to corner the dynamiters may 
serve to advertise the papers and the District Attorney, but are 
scarcely the proper tactics to catch a thief or cage a bomb artist. 

Dan Ryan, the once "near-Mayor," has blossomed out as 

an anti-railroad Lincoln-Roosevelt Republican and animadverts 
against the railroad. His attempt to defeat Mayor Taylor should 
be remembered, and his utterances accepted at exactly what 
they are worth. 

— ■ — King Alfonso has refused to take dictation from the fe- 
nd of the house, and the mother-in-law has been bounced. 
This is sudden and entirely unexpected. Alfonso looks like a 
long-suffering and patient man. Quite a revelation and enough 
to make Queen Vie to turn in her grave. Imagine llalbert Sea- 
ward talking hack to his wife or mother-in-law. 

The steel trust and the other big manufacturers in the 

limiting their employees among those who are 

n tie- country, or who have resided here for a "number 

of years, aol leas than live." and who are American citizens. This 

will please the honest citizen and act as a detern 
the hordes of tl in unwashed who threaten invasion. 

In New York steps have been taken to abate unnec 

noises. Wagons carrying iron or steel rails must sack th 
of the rails. Street organs or pianos are prohibited, loud singing 
r talking will lie discouraged, and offenders warned, and if 

ted, the offender will be arrested. This would be t 
law to 3 in Francisco, and it would enable angry citizens 

to reach Langdon. Aoh. Heney and Newburg — makers of un- 
- try noise. 

It is an am nain g thing to read of the many big improve- 

_ oing on at the Presidio and Fort Mason, when 

Down thai - st improvement of all. the building of 

men! and transport docks at Fort Mason is d 

through the District Attorney's office withholding papers that 

should have been in Washington long ago. A pretense is made 

mdemnation proceedings will he resorted to to force a low 

sal on the value of lands both sides of the ground rj 

nment. Bv some • 
machinery of the nation is ma • game, 

bus is progress blocked. 



^^^ 3 5 5 n n * i j. '• j * -i> 


| EDITORIAL 


COMMENT | 


Wl ■ "•' 



£ 



i m ' This is the Favorable Time to Build 

I ^ Bomb Throwing Being Traced to the Co 



Material and Labor Never so Cheap 
rly One. Spreckels the "high-minded" 



MjA 



The only development of the week 
Ruef and Claudianes. thai most lends the color of truth to 

the dynamitard's alleged confession 
to Langdon is the gradual enmeshing of Abe Ruef in the dime 
novel pint. There arc many people who scoui the idea as pre- 
posterous. Let us see. The Mews Letter lias no desire to 
credit the prosecution or its detectives with an undue or even a 
normal amount of active gray matter. The story of the confes- 
sion, the babblings of a man whose brains were befuddled with 
drink, did not appeal to sober imaginations, but there are fea- 
tures in the case thai seem to point directly at the curly l>oss as 
the incitci' of this crime At the time the alleged conspiracy 
to blow up Gallagher was hatched, the curly one was in jail, and 
with taint hope of an early release. What could be gained? 
There would be a two-fold result: intimidation or obliteration — 
revenge in either event. Now. the idiots who so mismanage the 
affairs of the Districi Attorney's office by their inordinate love 
of notoriety, have again overplayed their hand, and with the 
aid of the Examiner, gave Padeauvaris and "Pete" Claudianes 
eighteen hours" no; ire. 30 that these two much-wanted Greeks 

might escape. 

Padeauvaris was. until his vanishing act, one of the confiden- 
tial political agents of Ruef. Claudianes was, it is said, one of 
Padeauvaris's underlings in the delivery of the floating Greek 
vote. Padeauvaris and Claudianes were habitues of the gambling 
liell at Sausalito. It looks as if the trail was "hot." but it is dol- 
lars to doughnuts that Langdon and his "special agents" will 
Hush the game again. You cannot hunt criminals with a brass 
hand. The beating of cymbals and blare of horns, the making 
of uncouth noise-, would drive an innocent man to the woods, 
and thus give him a semblance of mult. 

They are talking of giving the two Claudianes and Padeau- 
varis "immunity" if thej will come in and help "put Ruef 
through." Never has any land been cursed with such a bunch 
of incapables as those in the employ of the Districi Attorney'fi 
office or the prosecution ! 



A HlGH-MlNDED 
I ; i:\TI, EMAN. 



The gazelle-eyed individual who 
graces The prosecution as its nominal 
head, together with Francis J. 
Heney, some time ago gave birth to 
the Lincoln-Roosevelt League. Some magazine historian, well 
versed in the language of the muck-raker when in a m 1 eulo- 
gistic, called the gazelle-eyed gentleman aforementioned "high- 
minded." Some of us, who are old-fashioned, have a concep- 
tion of "high-mindedness" that, in the light of after events, docs 
not at all agree with those of the literate muck raker mentioned. 
For instance, we do not believe that to be "high-minded" it 
is necessary to make dirty political bargains, to threaten people 
with blackmail. In reward "virtue" by public office, in control 
: he actions of delegates, to buy votes or to win approval by 
threats of physical violence or public pillory, h is not denied 
licit these ladies have been and arc in vogue when political bosses 
are fighting for supremacy, hut the average political boss does 
not pretend to he "high-minded" or virtuous. San Francisco 
has produced the only political sol ('-branded "high-minded" 

bosses — Abe Ruef and Rudolph Spreckels, bosses who use similar 
methods and who havi similar false opinion? of their own per- 
sonalities. 



gathering." What would a holiday be to'Mr. Heney if such op- 
portunity were denied him? According to the Associated Press, 
he said, while referring to the San Francisco graft prosecution : 
"F liken myself to a man with his hand on a bear's tail. If 
any one will help me let go, I will never take hold of it again." 
Such a confession was uncomfortably candid for simple repro- 
duction in a Spreckels organ, and accordingly the Call "doc- 
tored" the report, making Eeney say that "if any one would help 
him lei go of the tail of that hear honorably, he would take a 
nets hold." There can be little question as to which of these 

tw litions of Eeney's remarks is authentic. Evidently, even 

Heney himself has at - last come to realize the desperation of the 
position in which the Prosecution Trio. Spreckels. Burns and 
himself, now find themselves. And they bave no one hut them- 
selves 10 blame. Heney finds himself at the bear's tail, because 
the Prosecution lacked' the courage ami the honesty of purpose 
in flght the hen fa.-.' to face. If Ruef to-day is laughing at the 
plight of the Prosecution, it is because the Prosecution went out 
of their way to give him every possible opportunity to turn thf 
tables on them. If Heney himself could be believed, he is the 
most fearless of fighters, always armed aid ready for the fray. 
But there is the widest divergence between his boasts and his 
deeds. Otherwise, after two years of bear-hunting, he would not 
he found in the humiliating position, to which he himself con- 
fesses, anil crying for a chance to '"let go." 



It seems that Francis J. Heney had 

HENET at tiik io go several hundred m les fr 

Beak's Tail. home before he ventured to speak 

the truth concerning the present 
sorry plight of the Spreckels Prosecution. Murine a holiday in 
San Diego last week. .Mr. Heney. of course, "addressed a large 



Detective Burns, chief of the 
More "Poison-Pouring." Spreckels secret police, which force 

by tic grace of the Board of Super- 
visors is now io lie maintained at the expense of (he taxpayers, 
has once more leaped into the limelight, emerging from the ob- 
Bcurity which his finnan-haddie disguise afforded him for sev- 
eral nibs. With a personal municipal salary of i r fi"2. t > a month 

and commanding a fund of $4,375 a month. William J. Burns 
once more is a figure of some importance, and is commanding 
due publicity. Evidently jealous of the superior sleuth abilities 
of Examiner reporters. Mr. Burns attributes the deplorable mud- 
dle of the investigation of the Gallagher dynamite outrages to 
I he bungling, tactics of Mr. Heart's newspaper. But Mr. Burns 
is on record three months ago that these explosions were "no 
mystery" to him. It must he presumed that Mr. Burns had 
carefully stored his sensational disclosures, to exploit them in 
Ins own wax at In- own time, preferably on the eve of another 
Ruef trial. Naturally, he cannot conceal his chagrin that the 
Examiner, which has lampooned him to excoriation, should 
have beaten him to the post on his own job. But Mr. William 
J. Burns and his secret police have been busy in other directions, 
'tampering with prospective jurors-, involving the charge of 
contempt of court, and activity in "practical politics" to aid his 
angel, Rudolph Spreckels, and the holy cause of the Lincoln- 
Roosevelt League, appear to have been some of his recent indus- 
tries "on the side." Mr. Burns and his agents are accused of 
having approached prospective jurors with a petition on behalf 
of a fictitious "San Francisco Improvement Club" praying that 
the grafi prosecution cease from troubling. Such tactics are 
eminently characteristic of Mr. Burns's ingenious "poison-pour- 
ing" craft. By such chicanery any prospective juror not suffi- 
ciently friendly to the Spreckeis Prosecution could be eliminated 
from possible service. How do taxpayers view the expenditure 
of something like $200 a day for such Burns trickery? 



REFORM Politics. 



If any credence is to be placed 
on the testimony of five members of 
the Republican County Committee, 
the new brand of reform politics, as practiced by certain eminent 
leaders of the Lincoln-Roosevelt League, is very much like the 



June 25, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



old one, only worse and more raw. Mi. Rudolph Spreckels ap- 
parently regards reform in polities as equivalent to having his 
own way, which must be had at any price. With the hope of 
undermining the Organization's majority on the county commit- 
tee, Mr. Spreckels is accused of having bargained with certain 
members on a basis too unhappily familiar during the rule of 
the corruptionists whom Mr. Spreckels declares he is devoting 
his bright young life and fortune to overthrow. One cannot 
forget that similar tactics to those with which Mr, Spreckels 
is now charged were. alleged to have been employed in securing 
Mr. Spreckels's election last summer to a prominent club, and 
by no less a figure than J. Dalzell Brown. A director who was 
opposed to Mr. Spreckels's election was in the employ of Mr. 
Brown's bank. Mr. Spreckels's opponent was given the alter- 
native of resigning from the directorate or losing his position 
in the bank. According to the statements and affidavits of mem- 
bers of the county committee, who refused to enlist under the 
Lincoln-Roosevelt banner, Mr. Spreckels recently has been em- 
ploying similar methods of coercion and pressure. Mr. Pred G. 
Cartwright has made affidavit that Mr. Spreckels sent for him 
and warned him that he and Mr. James D. Phelan had talked 
over his business affairs, which might be seriously embarrassed 
unless Cartwright consented to resign from the committee. Mr. 
Rudolph Gercke, another member of the committee, charges that 
a representative of Mr. Spreckels threatened to interfere with 
his business unless he supported the Lincoln-Roosevelt League. 
Mr. Charles H. Forbes, the secretary of the committee, declares 
an attempt was made to bribe him with the promise of a comfort- 
able municipal berth if he would desert the organization. Has 
Mr. Spreckels, in his determination to be boss, already descended 
to the most corrupt weapons alleged to have been used by those 
bosses whose power he proposes to destroy? 



Better Unborn. 



In the Lincoln-Roosevelt League's 
campaign, Mr. William J. Burns 
naturally is discovered as an active 
lieutenant for his chief. Another member of the Republican 
County Committee has made affidavit that Mr. Burns offered 
him a steady job at $5 a day if he would forsake the organiza- 
tion. The Spreckels Secret Police evidently is to be used as a 
valuable adjunct to the Spreckels-Lincoln-Boosevell League, but 
why should taxpayers be made to bear the expense of Mr. Spreck- 
els's ambitions for political power? Moreover, if the Lincoln- 
Roosevelt League is to depend on no purer exponents of the new 
politics than William J. Burns, anil if iis leaders and agenta 
are to employ such methods as those already charged against 
Spreckels and Burns, it were better thai the League had neve. 1 
been horn, and that its "high-minded" program had never hem 
enunciated. 



After nearly two months of discus- 
Tim Suttku-St. Knot. sion, (lie Board of Supervisors has 

noi succeeded in. unraveling the 
knot into which it tied the Sutler Street Company's permit on 
lower Market street. The Supervisors have receded from two 
of the three conditions which thej endeavored to impose upon 

the Sutler Street Company before the] would renew the permit 
to use electricity instead of horses. The $l,OQ0 a month tax 
has been withdrawn, and the "anv other company" phras 
been eliminated, but the board still insists that i in company 
must continue to use horses instead of electricity, unless it will 

agree to share its franchise with a railroad owned by the 
municipality. There does not seem the least pro bat the 

Company will consent to make such a stipulation. Undei 
an agreement the Supervisors could promptly lease the Geary 

Street Railroad to the Spreckels-Phelan syndicate, ami with tie 
privilege of operating (Jean stive; cars through to the ferry. 
the rival company would he m command of an invaluable nucleus 
for the opposition system. In the meanwhile — and indefinitely 

public is forced to submit to serious inconvenience, an I 
San I uist continue to bear the reproach of i> 

car town. Nobody is benefited; nobody can t> 
It is obvious that flic Sutti S I ompany will not 
by the Supervisors into die abandonment of its franchise. It 
is equallj obvious thai if its frai inable, the courts 

alone can determine it. The Supervisors have chosen to act 
D ishes and intc - v civic and com- 

mercial bodv in San Francisco. Whose interests, then, are they 
attemp we? 



\ big row i* being made over the action of the 
Disi'ERSiNo police in dispersing the meeting of so-called 
Socialists Socialists after permission to hold the meeting 

had been applied for ami refused. The agitators 
then tried, apparently, to go ahead and hold their i ting any- 
how, which was wrong, and the police got busj and dispersed the 
gang, which was right. One id' the leaders, full of zeal anil an- 
tipathy to the police, had made a bomb to fake to the meeting, 
and took it. And though there wasn't much of a meeting, the 
"radical" insisted that his bomb should speak, if no one else 
could. And speak it did, and killed one hy-stander and mangled 
the "socialist" himself disastrously. And it developed that the 
fellow was an anarchist of record, with the papers that seemed 
to qualify him to work on anarchist jobs without risk of having 
the anarchists prove him to be a "scab," however much they 
might criticise his efforts as unskillful or untimely. 

Following the episode, Mitchell suggested that the city should 
provide a suitable place for "socialist" meetings, a large enclo- 
sure, surrounded by a tight fence, twenty feet high, made of 
armor belt, and roofed over near the rim with stout wire net- 
ting, which would let in light, air and rain, but prevent bombs 
from being thrown out from the inside. In such a fold as this, 
the socialists might meet all they liked, leaving the police safe 
outside, but taking their own chances of damage from the en- 
thusiasm of the meetings, or from anarchists with bombs who 
happened to be present. London' seems to get along without an 
institution of this sort : they let the "wild men" meet in the 
parks. 

There has been too much of the murderous conspiracy trace- 
able to "socialists" tolerated in recent years, and the sooner 
stern measures are adopted to bring these fanatics to time the 
better. 

These fire-eaters have joined hands in rebellion and lighted 
sacrificial fires fed with blood, and have sworn to die until the 
swords of their rulers become blunt. 

Whenever opportunity offers, they should he awarded substan- 
tial vacations in the official summer resort familiarly known as 
San Quentin. 



Tickling 

iiik I'm, ate. 

loeal culinary 



Lieutenant Colonel Davis of the King's army 
has recently incurred tin- gratitude of the world 
by the publication of a nobby booklet descrip- 
tive of what is good to eat. After surviving on 
products for several years, it is refreshing to dis- 
cover something new in the way of a dish. Colonel Davis. 1 
cannot refrain from suggesting, must have had bis share of 
quick lunch horrors, and. in a public spirited fashion, he now 
-lies us the products of bis experieii. 

Davis is a gourmet, a man of taste in the matter of cookery, 
and I may add. not a glutton. Hi- book leads to the breaking 
of several hygienic commandments, ami fatigues your throat 
long before p, rusal is finished. Four lips water frequently. 
The hook is to be commended because it registers the opinion ol 

a man whose palate is cultivated a- a tine art- -like the ear foi 
music, the eye for color or the poetic and literary sense. Hating 
is for pragm i -.-: dining Cor spiritual souls. This old-fashioned 
ail is passing. We are all too much in a hurry nowadays to savor 

i new- sanee, or ■ some creation of a _ 

With the advent of democracy, the first of the line art- to wither 

i- kery : socialism, no doubt, will drive us further into 

culinary barbarism. 

A bad liver is the stepfather of revolutions, and SO, when men 
advocate a return to bran, beans and the simple life, make up 
vour mind that they are dyspeptics. Bernard Shaw is said to 
have erected into hi- social svstem bis inability to . 
and F can see the vegetarian ami frugivorous author of "Mrs. 
Warren'- Profession," read Colonel Davis's hook and exclaim, 
"Horrors — gluttons." 

That Davie is i Britisher he lets a ■ when he touches on 

any other topic but fond and its preparation. He is perpetually 

apologizing for the fact that in certain Paris restaurants we 

may encounter birds of night, as if poor, virtuous London were 

some isolated village where a woman never goes on; 

dark. Many other little prejudices it tbey arc 

lannless. 

The subject of cuis - oly lightly touched, 
i olonel Davis savs. only a _ will do it justice, an 

- not like!, .piled, for no Frenchman would have 

•he patience to write it : no German tl - -hman 

rhe knowledge. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



June 25, 1908. 



Noui 10 tt|? ®tme tn Imlfc 



Labor and material arc plentiful. 
Repeat It to and lumber is lower in price than it 

Yode Friends. has been for four years. Those hav- 

ing a little money, and who own 
property, should take advantage of an extraordinary situation 
and build. BUILD NOW! You will not have lumber so cheap 
again in a number of years; cement is cheaper now than it has 
been for a long time, and lahnr is plentiful. The News Letter is 
convinced that this is the time and the hour, and its advice i- 
biiihl now, and if you do, money will loosen up and prosperity 
will be upon us with a vengeance ! The Presidential year means 
nothing! Confidence and the ability to seize the opportunity is 
all the leverage you want to assure prosperity. Money strin- 
gency is always largely fictitious! The present crisis was the 
result of an engineered scheme to blacken the President in the 
eyes of the public, because he had turned on the light. The light 
is still on, and the big concerns that were in the conspiracy to 
undermine the public confidence are the ones who have suffered 
the most! They started a small sized land-slide, and they 
reaped an overwhelming avalanche! The banks must let out 
more money: the interest rate must come down, and confidence 
must be restored! The way to do it is to build now! Ye who 
have a little saved, put it. out now where it will return to you in 
larger profit than at any other time in the last ten years. 



Silent workshops, idle crews and 
RrT Building dust-covered piles of merchandise 

Material Now. in the warehouses means stagna- 

tion for any country. The degree of 
stagnation is determined by the completeness of the close-down. 
A state of idleness appeals only to those whose vision is blurred 
and whose mind is distorted by false education. 

The science of merchandising applies to the buying of labor 
and building material just as trulv as it does to the purchase of 
goods sold across the counter. Well bought not only is half sold, 
but if unsold means an extremely good investment. To buy well 
is to buy at an opportune time — to have on hand goods that are 
in demand, whether the price paid be high or low. or to buy at 
or for less than cost of production ; in other words, for less than 
the recognized fair market value. 

It may be economical to pay a man $6 a day during a rush 
season in order to complete an unfinished piece of work. If 
this wage be far above the scale, such expenditure, however, is 
not, however, justified at all times. Business men must compare 
the outlav with the returns. 



It is possible now to secure more and better work for 
the same price than at any rime within the las: two years. 
Materials are cheaper, labor is cheaper, anxious for employ- 
ment and earnest in its desire to give full value. These 
certainly are factors which the wise investor should take 
into account. 



Saving Ten to ■ 
Twenty Per Cent. 



Buildings put up for investment 
yield not to exceed an average of 8 
per cent. By building at this time, 
investors should save 10 to 20 per 
cent on the coal ae i mipared with the cost in 1907, and the out- 
lay that probably will be required next vear. This is equivalent 
to the earnings on the investment for two and a half to three 
years. It is admitted, of course, that the demand is g, 
when prices are highest, and in turn, prices -are high because 
the demand is great. Humanity has one characteristic in com- 
mon with sheep, and that is, each requires a leader. Frequently 
the excuse Brown gives for building is: "Well. Jones is a shrewd 
fellow and he started to build : if it is a good thin? for him. it 
must be a good thing for me.'" In poinl of fact, what may be 
good for Jones may prove otherwise for Brown. 

Each individual should consider his own resources and scan 
closely every possible advantage. His determination to do or 
not to do should be formed not because of the activity of some 
ne else, but upon his own initiative. 



A word in regard to lumber prices:- Values necessarily will 
show fluctuations in the future. Sale prices will move up and 
down in response to heavy demand or its temporary restriction. 
The lumber trade of the country and the lumber consumers of 
the country should remember, however, that a steadily increas- 
ing demand is being filled from a constantly decreasing supply 
of timber. The inevitable outcome of these forces working one 
upon the other will be a higher price level. The history of past 
years shows that each decade has its high and its low prices, 
but the low prices of 1900 to 1910 will be about in line with the 
high prices of 1890 to 1900. There are possible exceptions, but 
few people have the opportunity to profit by the exceptions, 
which in substance mean the sacrifice of some one else's property 
to satisfy pressing claims. 



Lumber, brick, stone and other materials necessary to 
the construction of buildings, purchased and put into 
place at this time, will be worth in the new relation they 
bear one to the other a great deal more a year or two from 
now than the present cost. Furthermore, such structures 
will be readv for use. 



By diffusing the efforts of workmen over a broader period a 
two-fold advantage is gained; one is, the work is done without 
undue haste and more attention is given to the perfection of de- 
tails than where speed is essential. The other advantage is, thai 
by keeping a majority of the people of the country constantly 
employed, the dregs of depressed times are not tasted, and it is 
possible to pass through such periods without undermining or 
seriously impairing the credit and real interests of the country. 
Build Now ! 



A Fictitious but 
Effective Panic. 



Many well-known men of conserva- 
tive dispositions have stated that 
building can be done now at a less 
cost than at any time within the last 
five years. Some of those reporting go so far as to say within 
the last eight years. It is but natural to conclude that as soon 
as activity throughout the country becomes general and the de- 
mand for labor and material increases, there will be a return to 
the basic values which prevailed during and prior to 1907. It 
may take some time to recover the ground lost, but the people of 
the country should understand that the -depression which lately 
has shown a disposition to say good-bye was not brought about 
by reason of or supported by poor crops, pestilence or national 
disturbances of any kind. It was purely and simply an engi- 
neered money panic — a sudden evaporation of national confi- 
dence, eutailing severe consequences upon the business interests 
of the country. 



A FIFTY YEAR TEST. 

The many attempts during the past fifty years to Improve upon the 
standard of all Infant foods — Borden's Eagle Brand Condensed Milk — 
have been In vain. Eagle Brand Is prepared under rigid sanitary condi- 
tions. As an Infant food Its equal Is unattainable. 



* 




CHAS.KEJLUS& CO 

£KC£3USI\^E 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 



% 



No Branch Stores. No Agent*. 

Second Month and Continued Success of the 
FIRST SALE WE EVER HELD 

Our battery of real bargains have silenced all sham sales 

J20.00 and S30.00 

buys any suit or overcoat in our house, 

Paragon trousers SS & $b for choice. Even- garment must be sold. 



KING SOLOMON'S HALL 

Fillmore Street, near Sutter, San Francisco 



June 25, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 




<W 0*1 *UIfhr Or *nUr. tot/mt 



THE PHARISEES. 

Let those sententious prudes and fools, 

Who think they're Nature's choicest breed, 

Lay down for you and me the rules 
Of life, and predicate a creed 

Which fits their case, because, Alas ! 
Their ancestor is Balaam's ass. 

Live and let live, who can deny 

The wisdom of this ancient phrase? 
Let each one have his separate try 

At solving Life's bewildering maze, 
For know, blind leaders of the blind, 

Who does not seek can never find. 

And if, perchance, we never find 

We stand erect and fearless gaze, 
Into the dark in front, behind ; 

Nor see the error of our ways, 
Nor own that we are wrong, forsooth, 

Because we've vainly sought the truth. 

J. A. Henshall. 

A new and another abuse of the United States transport 

service develops in the cheap junket of a lot of Hawaiian school- 
marms who have been shipped to this coast on the "subsistence" 
schedule, and expect to return by the same route on the same 
terms when they shall tire of their "vacation." At the Govern- 
ment rate of one dollar a day for "subsistence," the trip should 
not cost these interlopers upon the good nature of some suscept- 
ible quartermaster more than $10 for the round voyage — women, 
and especially schoolmarms, being proverbially "skin tight" 
when it comes to tipping the deck boys and the bunk builders of 
steamships. Whatever surplus coin the ladies brought with them 
will be needed to defray the expense of fripperies and furbe- 
lows at the shops of the "mainland." One good turn, however, 
deserves another; and our own schoolmarms eun now ask for 
similar privilege on any of the transports and a month's wages 
will pay for a trip to Japan or Manila. Ho, for the Orient on 
a dollar a day, with deck chairs and steamer rugs on applica- 
tion ! But only schoolmarms need apply. 

The Examiner hangs tenaciously to its Claudianes 

"scoop." I am not finding fault with the Examiner. It has 
been so long since the Examiner "scooped" anything that it is 
entitled to scream its loudest whenever something "exclusive" 
comes its way. There was a time when the Examiner was the 
Abou Ben Adhem of San Francisco newspapers, but that was 
long ago. Nowadays, if you don'l want the news, read the Ex- 
aminer. Not only is it distanced by its competitors in the mat- 
ter of exclusive publication, but it is badly written, badly edited 
and badly managed. It is no longer a newspaper; it is a mass 
of diurnal garble — it should be denied "second class" privileges 
in the mails. The Claudianes "80000" is a sample of Examiner 
news enterprise. The persons who devised that "plant" should 
organize themselves into B private detective agency, and adi 
tise for divorce business •'without publicity." 

Women who are screwing their courage to the "directoire" 

point will do well to learn bow to pronounce the word before 
they expose their legs. It is a French word with a peculiar ac- 
centual twist, and it is not every tongue that can properly utter 
the "oire" of the vocable. Only those to the manner born are 

rfect in the utterance. However, there is a way out of it for 
those who fail in describing themselves after the French fashion: 
They can Bay that they wear a "sheath gown." or that they cre- 
ated a sensation in front of the Fillmore stiv ; -tores in a 
"slit skirt." Moreover, onlv those who are "fat to the heels, like 
a Mullingar heifer." should wear the gown or attempt the pro- 
nunciation ; the skirt is not for the spindleuse : for comparisons 
will be odious on Fillmore street. 



Charity wears strange frocks in these modern days when 

universities quibble over tainted money, and hospitals' accept 
the wage of the race track. One of the mosl incomprehensible 

charity propositions that I have heard of is being considered by 
the board of managers of an institution that cares for young 
children. They arc very much in nerd of funds, it must be ad- 
mitted, and are loth to refuse what they consider would be a 
good drawing card. A young woman has offered to do the 
Salome dance a la Maud Allen, or Maud Durrant, as we know 
her out here. Those who have seen this dance say that the 
scenery represents King Herod's palace and the costume repre- 
sents Miss Allen herself — in fact, the word "costume" is super- 
fluous. To be sure, she does wear a good deal of jewelry. The 
board are equally divided about accepting the Salome offer, and 
I undertand they meet every day and wrangle over it. Those in 
favor protest that the local Salome could wear more clothes than 
the originator of the dance, and so propitiate the prudes. I 
have seen a faro game running full blast at a church bazar, so 
the Salome dance may not be out of joint for an affair whose 
concern is the upbuilding of the juvenile character. 

Bill Langdon is having a walloping time cavorting around 

in the Claudianes case. Bill has sure come to life again, ami 
he is snorting like a bucking broncho. His name is in the paper* 
every day. His picture'll get there as soon as the reporters run 
short of stuff with which to pad their "stories." Of course, Bill 
doesn't expect to convict anybody — Bill's triumphs in this phase 
of law practice will come when he appears as "the attorney for 
the defense, and it is more than likely that all this fuss on 
Bill's behalf is merely a preliminary boost for his "private prac- 
tice," into which he will absorb himself as soon as Spreckels 
shakes himself leg free. Bill is the elusive pea in the graft 
prosecution's shell game; now you see him and now you don't; 
you think he's under the shell where he was put, but he isn't 1 
you bet on him, and as sure as Heney, you lose your money. 
Bill is a bird, and no mistake — a cuckoo bird. 

The assertion that the Derby hat is responsible for the 

appalling baldness of our men of mark is still making the rounds 
of the press. I wonder if Elijah, when he wreaked such a fearful 
and unchristian revenge on the little children who joked at his 
billiard-like cranium, was the victim of a Knox or a Dunlop? 
In like manner, it is interesting to remember that if Aeschylus 
had had the good sense to wear s Stetson, thai miserable eagle 
would never have mistaken his mirrored caput for a gleaming 
rock, and the tortoise might possibly have also escaped with its 
life. Incidentally it may be admitted that 1 am bald, and am 
thoroughly convinced that baldness is the concomitant of abnor- 
mal intellectual development. 





Ideal Store for Undergarments 

We are prepared to supply you with Ladh 
Misses Underwear. We are Makers of this weal 
and are in a position to state that it is impossible 
to procure elsewhere such good values as we 
offer for garments that we recommend to contain 
most substantial qualities of trimmings, best tex- 
tile and finish. 

We cordially invite your inspection. 

VAN NESS AVE. ofc BUSH ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LBTTEE 



June 35, 1908. 




»i*.'-Wll"i" J -!--..l '•- 



LOOKER. ON 







Most of the iron frames going up in San Francisco an' being 
put up by iron workers brought from the East. What ''xrtisr 
has our city for not furnishing the material ami skilled Labor? 
To a San Franciscan this is very humiliating. Our •'natural 
advantages" is a hackneyed subject; everybody who knows San 
Francisco knows that. BO we will let it pass. But it is about time 
for the employers of this city to assert their individuality as a 
body. What the employer has not suffered, the employee has 
not'thought of. A little self-sacrifice, a little positive resistance, 
would have settled this union business years ago. As it is. the 
whole experience is to be repeated. At this moment a new rail- 
road strike is no uncommon subject for conversation. Few peo- 
ple Learn by observation — more by experience — but with us. ex- 
perience has little more value than observation. The free soup 
of to-day nourishes the strike of to-morrow. There seems to be 
a glamour about an agitator conducive to forgetfulness. No 
matter what the working man has suffered, no matter what has 
afflicted his family, a few words from a filthy demagogue, fat- 
tening on strife, serves to fulminate a disturbance. An old resi- 
dent told me that as it was characteristic of San Francisco, he 
saw no remedy, and has long been reconciled to such. As to the 
depression, that exist- in its entirety, but there are some sly 
foxes picking up real estate all over town. The habit of pooh- 
poohing property on the outskirts can never be eradicated from 
people looking for investments, and that is the reason so many 
miss good investments. San Francisco is growing, arid will g 
faster; our investors are too impatient: they are thirsting after 
a "boom." The men who have realized fortunes from real estate 
are the waiters — men who buy property, and never think of sell- 
ing until time brings a big price. A watched pot never boils! 
But since '92 there has been no such depression and utter finan- 
cial apathy in San Francisco. The long and short of the matter 
is, people are tired and disgusted, going through that negative 
state which may be called passive desperation. Woe unto a 
city when the demon of Don't Care, the monster of Indifference, 
usurps the place of interest and enthusiasm. A business man 
told me that no money can be borrowed, for no security is con- 
sidered by the banks. Think of it! A city like this whose banks 
repudiate its real estate as collateral. However, this panic ends 
San Francisco's catalogue of woe.-, she has stood everything 
else that nature or man can inflict. This is the last arrow in the 
quiver of adversitv. 

* * * 

At last they are scattering oil more generously about the 
What dust there was is a memory. To appreciate Golden Gate 
Park, one must have visited Central Park. New York, Prospect 
Park, Brooklyn, and Hyde Park, London. Not one of them 
can compare with this enchanting spot. The Orientals called 
such a place a "paradise," which in fact means a piece of ground 
devoted to trees and flowers. The famous "Hanging Gardens" 
of Babylon was a sample. Golden Gate Park has none of the 
stiffness of most Eastern parks. In no case has art conflicted 
with nature, in no feature has man failed to enhance the charm 
begun before he was. But speaking of such things, it is sur- 
prising to know that the manure from our livery stables is a 
drug on the market. Owners pay people to haul it away. In 
other parts of the country, this fertilizer realizes four-bits a 
load. But I suppose we are too unsophisticated in finance thus 
far to realize what economy in details means. Whatever San 
Francisco lacks, she knows how to enjoy herself. I question 
whether, for our size and wealth, there be a city on earth where 
relaxation is so well understood. In due time our sewer system 
will be improved aud our noble bay cease to be polluted with re- 
fuse. Then we are going to have stone docks; we are already 
opposing unnecessary noise and undoubtedly we shall have a 
fleet here permanently. I have often wondered why San Francisco 
is not the capital of California. By right, that honor belongs 
to us, and. I can see no cause for Sacramento being what our 
city should be. There is a deal of talk about Los Angeles being 
our rival. Los Angeles may possess features we lack through 
our own fault, but that the Southern city should ever compete 



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with us, save in some details, is absurd. Yet why should that 
city monopolize so many Eastern people? There must be some 
cause for their preference. I don't think any one need grope 
long for an explanation. This is pre-eminently an age of adver- 
tising; few do anything unless asked. Los Angeles has been ad- 
vertised to an extent that we can't understand. Every town and 
city in the East has been and is flooded with hifalutin descrip- 
tions of location, climate, soil and Good Government. People 
naturally notice what invites their attention. There are an in- 
finite number of rich people who are in search of a residence, 
people who, having realized a competence, want to escape the 
heat and cold unknown here. Such a man snaps at a specious 
advertisement like a trout at a fly. Tens of thousands come to 
Los Angeles who_ never consider it worth their while to run up 
to San Francisco". The most effective kind of advertisement is 
running excursions to the place you want to advertise. There 
should be an excursion from the East here once a month. 

* * * 

Queen Victoria's letters are published, and I believe will have 
a large sale. Perhaps there has been no royal family more noted 
for lack of intellect and surplus of praise than the House of 
Hanover. Her late majesty was a woman of sturdy virtue and 
possessed every attribute essential to a wife and mother, but to 
exploit her as an intellectual woman is piling on the agony. The 
last king of any strength of character who sat on the English 
throne was William of Orange, a man possessing in a marked 
degree the traits and virtues of his house. He was a Dutchman. 
Victoria was the grand-daughter of George III of revolutionary 
memory. She has been compared to Elizabeth intellectually, but 
if history speaks true, unjustly. Elizabeth was royal only on 
her father's side, and was a woman of transcending genius. Of 



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course she cursed, swore and boxed her courtiers' earSj hut thai 
fitted the etiquette of the age She Bhone with great lustre. 
and adorned the Augustan age of English statesmanship and 
poetry. I doubt if ever so many greai men ever lived before or 
since under one sovereign. Victoria's reign was one of peace. 
She came to the throne as a girl of seventeen shortly after Eng- 
land had begun to recover from the Napoleonic wars. She has 
been blessed with good advisors, and her reign has been plain 
sailing. I never could discover anything but goodness in the 
old lady. I have read one book she wrote and it was beyond 
question mediocre, to put it mildly. The nobility of England 
has furnished many great men. The breed is not so mixed as 
royalty, and the infusion of new blood tells. I doubt whether 
the English nobility and English country gentlemen have the 
equal on earth. But their list of kings and queens makes monot- 
onous reading. I know of no English king above mediocrity who 
was not a usurper. The present king is a jolly fellow, fond of 
sport, rich in hon homie and said to excel in the tact belonging 
to a well-bred man. As to what consanguinity consists in is a 
mooted question. Cousins marry in England with impunity, but 
I know of cases in our own country where scrofula, insanity, etc., 
have been traced to such unions. Very often it is not the mar- 
riage itself as the combining of the two slight disorders that be- 
long to the contracting parties as members of the same family. 
In other words, the marriage doubles what widoiibled would 
pass unnoticed. The Persian and Egyptian sovereigns married 
their sisters. The royal families of Europe must suffer from in- 
herited disorders. The same blood stagnates if permitted no out- 
let. Darwin says that marrying an adopted sister with whom you 
have been reared is worse than marrying cousins. The subject 
is an intricate one, and has been tested only thoroughly in what 
is known as domestic select inn in the breeding of animals. 

* * * 

Among the leading florists on Van Ness avenue and Kearny 
street, the peony is furnishing one of the most remarkable little 
social phenomena. Among much that is altogether lovely — 
irises, orchids, roses and long-spurred columbines, there is no 
doubt about the predominance of the peonies. To tell the truth, 
the amazing advance which the peony has made during the last 
few years alike in popularity and in beauty and variety of form, 
can hardly be believed, save by those who have watched its 
progress. Assuredly the time has long gone bj when the peony 
was looked upon as a sort of clumsy, scentless rose. Some of the 
new varieties of single peonies, magnificenl blooms, with petals 
of exquisite tint and texture, with sdorious golden hearts, aid 
in many Cases a perfume of indescribable sweetness, arc hardly 
to be recognized as even relatives of the half-despised flower of 
years ago. it seems, indeed, that the peonies have stolen at once 
the scent id' the rose, the splendor of the rhododendron, ami the 
delicacy of the anemone. 

At Madame Young's spiritualistic circle the other evening, 
a woman was pleading with ilc wily old medium to summon her 
husband from the realm of Immortals. "Here pirit of 

your late husband." said Madame Young, im "It 

can't lie peer Waller." the woman promptly replied. "Walter 
had no spirit." 

* * * 

With Rear-Admiral Evans's health ruined for life and Bear- 
Admiral Thomas, who succeeded him in command, dead and 
in bis grave. 11 is im wonder that people are beginning to realize 
that the strain of controlling modern 

battleships and all their auxiliaries, is a tremendous one. which 
i'vw elderly nun can endure. A man must lie in his pi 
survive the physii lea and mental strain of such a posi- 

tion. Evans and Thomas were 68 yes when they made 

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8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



June 25, 1908. 



it has, from all accounts, already produced good results. The 
officers below the rank of colonel, the rank aDd file, and indeed 
all who entered the Guard actuated by the true spirit of the sol- 
dier, unite in expressing their satisfaction with the new order 
of things. The recent militia law has done more than anything 
else to make the National Guard a true first reserve for the 
regular army, and its days of holiday parades and flower festi- 
vals are numbered. From now on, its members are genuine sol- 
diers, with responsibilities to nation as well as to State. The 
annual encampments are now strict schools of practical warfare 
instead of the holiday picnics they have too often been in the 
past. "With the new spirit which has been infused into the ranks 
of the National Guard, its real soldiers are more zealous than 
ever; an excellent class of new material is being attracted to it, 
and we now have a first reserve ready to proceed anywhere, fully 
organized, equipped and trained, to re-inforce our garrisons of 
the regular army at the first sound of war, and pending the for- 
mation of the volunteer army. 

* * * 
One of the best laws ever passed in this country, and one of 
the most efficient, is the Pure Food Law. Its fruits are seen 
in the -general health of our people. Until recently, dietetics 
was one of those vague subjects that cranks advocated and or- 
dinary folks disregarded or laughed at. The American stomach 
was advertised in its owner's complexion. The ruddy hue of 
the Englishman or German was relatively unknown. Every- 
thing was food that came to our mouths. Perhaps the first and 
greatest step was the crusade against lard. Dyspepsia, our 
national favorite, has been relegated to the ignorant. Tea is 
recognized as bad for the kidneys, coffee equally so for the liver. 
If ever the hog has had his revenge on his murderers, it has 
been on the American people. How strange that, while even 
the most ignorant man carefully selects the material for house 
building, even the intelligent man is so careless in chosing the 
material for body building. The majority of people have no 
more taste in selecting food than they have in selecting tobacco. 
I know men whose idea of tobacco is of something that makes a 
smoke ; as to how the smoke smells, and as to its flavor, that is 
for the epicure. But we all have improved, most of us, inde- 
pendently of our wishes. The secret lies in prohibiting a poor 
quality of food from being put on the market. The liquor ques- 
tion should be settled in the same way, and it will be. We have 
got to recognize the fact that right or wrong, the vast majority 
of the people claim liquor as an essential. To combat millions 
who are desirous of satisfying their craving with sentiment is 
manifestly absurd. What can't be conquered, must be treated 
conditionally. It is not a matter of right or wrong, but a ques- 
tion of expediency. Shall we dilly-dally with this tremendous 
subject or shall we take definite and effectual measures to com- 
bat it. I mentioned the W. C. T. U. army canteen fiasco before, 
which is an eternal refutation of prohibition as a prohibitive 
measure. The "compromising with vice" argument is mawkish 
absurdity, slobbering idiocy. If we can assist virtue by compro- 
mising with vice, by all means let us compromise. We vote for 
prohibition, carry it, shut up the grog shops, and — and open 
them next election. We can't legislate against this evil alto- 
gether; we may help it with high license, and rigid inspection 
and severe penalties. But to expunge an evil suddenly that is 
rooted, in self-interest, self-indulgence and years — preposterous ! 
Wha t. would prohibition do with our grapes ? Would the churches 
consent to defray their part of the increased taxes? Prohibition 
would simply kill our wine industry. The question is, which is 
worse, ruining families through destruction of their vineyards, 
or individuals who are fools enough to drink too much. 

The vacation time is come, and before going to the coun- 
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and is packing them away for use when the family returns. The 
carpet and the rugs should be cleaned anyway, before the warm 
weather comes and the house given a thorough overhauling. If 
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ANT) CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



PLEASURES 
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I!y Hakxktt Franklin. 
'"/'Ac Servant in the House," at the Van Ness. 

That much-discussed play of Charles Kami Kennedy's, "The 
Servanl in the Rouse," which has just come to as, is unquestion- 
ably a mystical masterpiece. Morality plays have not been looked 
upon with favor of late by producing managers, who gauge 
dramatic offerings Erom the box-office angle, and the extraor- 
dinary success of this play in New York has created more than 
mild amazement along the Great White Lane. In the face of 
competition with the host, of musical comedies with which the 

S mei' season is saturated, it has kept on making good. In 

the sweltering months when the roof gardens are the regulation 
retreats of the amusement-seeker, this remarkable piece of 
dramaturgy has ool waned in public favor. A New York dra- 
matic triumph, in the season of the pineapple-sundae, speaks for 
the unusual. 

After seeing "The Servant in the House." it is self-evident 
why it. lias been acclaimed the "one big originality of the pres- 
ent day." The exposition of its theories is brought about by 
methods at once unusual, but ever compelling. That is the point: 
the play is ever compelling. You cannot escape its power. 

All this in spite of the fact that there are many that resent 
seeing an actor made up for the Sun of God on the stage. The 
play revolves around the suggested Presence. True, lie is pro- 
grammed the Bishop ill' Benares, but there is never the faintest 
suggestion of a doubt as to the intention of the author. The 
Bishop of Benares is the'spirit of Christ personified. Hanging 
mi the wall throughout Hie action of the play is a picture of 
Christ, which the actor imitates in costume ami posture. To 
siime, the idea of a man so garbed, acting as a huller anil 
springing a mild jest now ami again, may ho adjudged as not be- 
ing in particularly good taste. 

It seems In me. however, thai the art of the actor of this role, 
Waller Hampden, is so line, ami II, e total absence of irreverence 
in his characterization is so pronounced, that the argument has 
mil a great amount of weight in this instance. The playwright 
and his interpreter have caught the sympathetic spirit of the 
thing. 

"The Servant in the House," allegory or drama as you may 
choose lo call il, stands pre-eminently for a big idea. It is a 
cry against the Christianity of the modern church, an arraign- 
ment «if the hypocritical clergy. Il is lirst and always a sermon; 
i In' subject mailer is never lost sight of in I he varied convolutions 
of the plot II is ever present, boldly and vividly, and through 
il all is projected the dignified dominance of the Spirit. Dra- 
malieally the play has to do wiih three brothers, who arc brought 
together after years of separation: a vicar who is seeking to 

Save himself from his worldly nature: a besotted outcast, ami 

the Bishop of Benares, who comes unknown to the vicar's house 
as Maiison. a butler. Then there is a remarkable character in 
the brother of the vicar's wife, the Lord B Lancashire 

who symbolizes the mercenary hypocritical clei 

These characters c luce to an action dramatically that con- 
stantly holds Mm in its thrall. As a play purely and simply, the 
dramatisl ha- contrived wiih a sure hand. His startling 
naliiv of Bituation-handling, and his frequent disregard I 
cepted dramatic canons, make for a _ ation of the 

spell of the thing. Of course, hero and there are minor struc- 
tural faults that obtrude, 'nit they are obtrusions in minor key. 
There are a couple of dialogues in the last two acts, and one in 

it the outcast brother, the drain-man, and Mary, 

LUghter, thai are long drawn out. somewhat tedious, and 
ived by the arts of the exceptional a. tors of the 
company. The character of the hypocritical bishop is - 
dciiiK over-accentuated. 1 don er met with 

i tie a wearer of the cloth as this one thai Mr. Ken- 
nedy presents. A little of the soft-pedal would, it appears to 
me, accomplish the author's purpose of symbolism quite as ade- 
quately and certainly more reasonably. » points are 
bough, in the engrossing power of the whole. The won- 




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derful atmosphere that, is built up, the mystic spell of it all, the 
big idea, these are the things that have made this stage-wonder 
hold the play-goer of this prosaic day in such incredible fashion. 
And this, too, at a time when a musical comedy exploiting the 
Directoire skirt and what it exposed would be considered the 
correct thing dramatically from a managerial viewpoint! 

Too much cannot he said in praise of the members of the 
Henry Miller Associate Players, who enact. "The Servant in the 
House." Tyrone Power, as the drain-man, a' gentleman of 
necessary occupation, presents as admirable a characterization of 
a difficult role as we have soon in many a day. The teachings 
of the part may he somewhat fallacious, hut that is a quarrel 
with the author and not with Mr. Power. His is character-act- 
ing at iis finest. 

Miss Edith Wynne Matthison is an actress of wonderful charm 
ami great repressive power. Her part is that of the vicar's wife, 
ami io say she adequately fills her role would he a mild form of 
praise. She is a line type of tin- intellectual actress, a breath of 

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10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



June 35, 1908. 



dominated by artificiality and stageyness, and where gray-matter 
is an unknown quantity. 

Another excellent actor is Walter Hampden, who simulates the 
Presence majestically and yet with a fine mildness and beauty. 
The grafting bishop is a most interesting portrait in the hands 
of a very capable actor, Mr. Arthur Lewis. Gwladys Wynne as 
the drain-man's girl, Edward Rami Kennedy as the vicar, and 
Galwey Herbert as the page-boy, are all in the picture. It is a 
uniformly splendid cast, as unusual, in fact, as the unusual 
drama itself. 



"The Song Birds" and "The Bridal Trap" at the Princess. 

"The Song Birds," that clever travesty of the Hammerstein- 
Conreid musical war, which you will remember as being given 
at the Princess during last April, is being revived for the week, 
and repeating its former success. The responsibility for "The 
Song Birds" is laid at the doors of Victor Herbert, the resource- 
ful, who wrote the music, and George V. Hobart, of Sunday sup- 
plement newspaperiety, who builded the lines. The burlesque 
is riotous with tunefulness, and "The Battle of B Plat," which 
climaxes the performance, is as masterful a piece of orchestra- 
tion as can be found in the range of light opera. We have the 
two rival impressarios wildly exhorting their song birds to their 
utmost capacities, each faction seeking to drown the other in 
sound volume. The power of the concerted Princess larynx is 
certainly prodigious. 

Miss Evelyn Frances Kellogg is excellent as Madame Tat- 
tletallezini, and she shows her control of several first-class top- 
notes. The trio, "Mazuma," by Madame Tattletallezini, Al- 
lesandro Bounce and Eddie de Rest-Cure, is as funny as ever. 
Equally so is the trio done by Robinson Caruso, Peter Pantson, 
and Emma Screams. 

As Con, the Conreid, Oscar C. Apfel does an admirable piece 
of caricature, and William Burress invests the role of Hammer- 
shine with the same unction as before. In fact, all the parts are 
handled in the real spirit of burlesque, and Arthur Cunningham, 
Sarah Edwards, M. la Vigne, Oliver La Noir, and Charles Cou- 
ture help the thing along with good comedy and Class "A" 
warbling. 

In the face of the uproarious merriment of the "Song Birds," 
ii is sad to have to chronicle the fact that "The Bridal Trap," 
the fore-piece, is as funereal an apology for light opera as they 
make 'em. It is one of those tra. la, la — tra la lu effusions of 
yesteryear, in which the chorus exclaims. "Behold! here she 
comes !" every fourth minute. The libretto is not in the same 
class with a patent medicine almanac. Why the Princess un- 
earthed such a dismal affair passeth understanding. The single 
oasis in the desert of gloom is the topical song in the second act, 
which is cleverly done by Frank Farrington. That's all worth 
mentioning. Otherwise, "The Bridal Trap" is cordially recom- 
mended as an admirable substitute for a sleeping potion. 

* * ,* 
Real Thrills at the Orpheum-. 

The Tom Davies Trio at the Orpheum exemplifies the fact 
Hint variety is the spice of vaudeville. The art. "Motoring in 
Mid-Air," possesses both novelty and spier, no! in mention more 
than a few thrills. The three cyclists whirl around a bottomless 
funnel-shaped enclosure raised ten feet above the stage, ami defj 
the laws of gravity. I guarantee you fifteen minutes of solid 
thrills and a few extra-quick heart-beats. 

The four Fords we have had here before in their dancing 
specialty. They have, if anything, improved in their work, and 
their shoe-shuffling, as it is exhibited, is no doubt the best on 
the vaudeville stage. 

An act in which buffoonery of a very clever sort enters is the 
one of Martinettie and Sylvester. The clowning is not subtle, 
perhaps, hut it is never offensive, and it can be equally enjoved 
by the tall-brows and the gallcryites. The constant mix-ups' of 
Hie comedian of the firm with the profusion of chairs on the 
stage are genuinely funny. 

These three new acts are uniformly excellent, and then there 
is that admirable actor, William Thompson and the Clay Greene 
playlet, "For Love's Sweet Sake," which is a thousand 'per cent 
better than it sounds. The value to vaudeville of actors like 
Thompson and sketches like Greene's cannot be overestimated. 
Katie Barry keeps up the good work of last week, and the 
Lavigne-Cimaron Trio, Fred Singer, and the awful, woeful 



"Story of the Street," done by Barry and Hughes, fill out the 
programme. The closing picture contributed by the moving 
picture machine is particularly worth while. 

* • • 

"If I Were King" at the Alcazar. 

Justin Huntly McCarthy's "If I Were King" proves the 
finest sort of an antidote for last week's inane product of the 
Fitch play-factory. The play is well known here, Sothern him- 
self, for whom it was written, having appeared in the part. 

There is a great deal of atmosphere to the play, and a fine 
romantic spirit pervades the whole action. The play requires 
lavish settings and costuming, which the Alcazar management 
has adequately provided. White Whittlesey does the Sothern 
role, and Miss Barriscale has the graceful part of Katberine. 
Particularly good is A. Burt Wesner as Louis XI. It is a most 
elaborate production in its entirety. 

* * '» 

ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

"Tin' Servant in the House" has made a deep impression 
locally, and Mr. Kennedy's wonderfully successful dramatized 
sermon will be given for one more week at I lie Van N'ess Thea- 
tre. "The Servant in the House" is reviewed in another column. 

* * * 

The New York musical comedy hit, "The Chaperons," will 
be given its first production locally at the Princess Ibis Monday 
nigbt. The first act takes place in the Quartier Latin, Paris, at 
the present day. Adam Hogg, a Cincinnati pork packer and 
President of the International Society for the Investigation and 
Suppression of Vice, arrives in search of his ward, Violet Smi- 
lax. who is masquerading in Paris as Caraola in the Conserva- 
. tory of Chaperons, and who has the seal of her father's will, with 
out which it cannot be probated in America. Violet meets and 
marries Tom Schuyler, an American musical student, whom she 
has known in her own country in former years. Algernon 
O'Shaughnessy, a New York Subway contractor, appears on the 
scene, and becomes an easy victim to the wiles of Aramanthe and 
her associates. Signor Ricardo Bassiui, proprietor of the an- 
cient and honorable Parisian's Opera Company, engages all of 
them to recruit his chorus for a tour of Egypt, for which Hogg 
has consented to be the angel. The second act takes place in the 
court yard of the Imperial Hotel, Alexandria, Egypt. Owing to 
bad business, and the withdrawal of Hogg's financial support, 
the Opera Company is stranded. Eventually their distress is re- 
lieved after many humorous experiences, and everything ter- 
minates satisfactorily. The cast will be an exceptionally strong 
and attractive one. William Burress will appear as Algernon 
O'Shaughnessy, studying rapid transit in Paris, aDd May Boley 
will have a congenial role as Amaranthe Dedineourt, Evelyn 
Frances Kellogg will be Violet Smilax. and that clever character 
actor, Oscar C. Apfel, will personate Adam Hogg. Arthur Cun- 
ningham, Zoe Barnetr, Christina Nielsen, Sarah Edwards and 
Charles E. Couture will also be in the cast. 

» * * 

For the first time since White Whittlesey's return to the Al- 
cazar, the players in that theatre will strut in modern garb next 
week, when "1 tallies" will be the bill, with Mr. Whittlesey in 
the title role. No play treating of crime has been more exten- 
sively advertised than this, for E. W. Hornung's stories of the 
amateur cracksman were famous on three continents when 
Eugene W. Presbrey put them into dramatic form, and the num- 
bei of enlightened English-speaking people who have neither 
read the tales or witnessed the drama is very few. Mr. Whittlesey 
will be cast in the role of the philosopher who steals for love of 
the sport as much as for love of the spoils. Bessie Barriscale, 
Will I?. Walling, Louise Brownell, Howard Hickman, John B. 
Maher, in fact, all the Alcazar favorites, will be suitably cast. 
Belasco & Mayer announce that the play will be given a most 

complete production. 

* * * 

lite programme at (he Orpheum Eor the week beginning Ibis 



If 

Vsr 

* * Gel 



EyggaawgssjB 



HARTSHORN 
SHADE ROLLERS 



Bear the script name 

Stewart Hartshorn on label. 



* 



Get "Improved," no tacks required 

Wood Rollers Tla Rollers 



June 25, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



Sunday matinee is headed by Ben Welch, the popular comedian. 
Mr. Weloh has won his splendid reputation by the artistic and 
realistic manner in which lie portrays different types of charac- 
ter. He presents to his audiences the rough, low caste, but ex- 
tremely witty and interesting Hebrew. The Basque Quartette, 
said to be one of the best musical acts on the vaudeville stage, 
will also appear. Their repertoire is composed of songs from the 
most popular French and Italian operas. Wilbur Mack and Nella 
Walker will appear in a musical skit entitled "The Girl and the 
Pearl."' Mr. Mack is a comedian who sings several songs of 
his own composition, and Miss Walker is a lively and engaging 
actress. Fentelle and Can- will introduce an original act, in 
which comedy and eccentric dancing play an important part. 
Sadie Sherman will return for one week with her act, "Pun at 
the Photographers." It will be the last week of the Tom Davies 
Trio in their sensational act, "Motoring in Mid-Air," Martinettie 
and Sylvester in their funny chair performance, and of those 
wonderful dancers, the Pour Fords. New and interesting Motion 
Pictures will conclude the performance. 

* * * 

For the fifth week of the season, Henry Miller will make his 
appearance in the new comedy entitled "Mater." It is from 
the pen of Percy Mackaye, and will receive its premiere here. 
Isabel Irving has been especially engaged to play the leading 
feminine role. 

"The Only Way" will be played by Henry Miller and a big- 
cast at the Van Ness Theatre early next month. 



&% 8>L OlriBjJttt of ©to anb i^ia 3TnHnmpra 

Between the years 275 and 300, a Roman shoemaker by the 
name of Crispin was converted to Christianity, and deeming it to 
be his duty to devote his life to' the conversion of pagans to his 
way of thinking, and knowing that a prophet is always discred- 
ited in his own country, he turned himself into an evangelist and 
set out on a tour through wicked Gaul. And desiring to imitate 
Paul and earn his own bread and butter, he made shoes, when 
not preaching, and sold them to the poor at worse than "cut 
rates." His reason for reducing prices was that the raw mater- 
ial cost him nothing at all, it being supplied by the ministry of 
angels. But the report got abroad that in fact Crispin got his 
leather by theft, and upon investigation by a magistrate of Gaul, 
the court ordered the bailiff to take the evangelist out to the 
back yard and chop off his head. He being the first shoe-maker 
martyr, the church promptly canonized him, and ever since, St. 
Crispin has been the patron saint of the cordoniers' or shoe- 
makers' craft, and when organized as unions or leagues or guilds 
each member is dubbed and created a Knight of St. Crispin. 

But what has all this to do with (he peremptory demand of 
the Boot and Shoemakers' White Labor League of San Fran- 
cisco upon the News Letter to explain "why it persists in 'creat- 
ing a market' for the products of the millionaire manufacturers 
of shoddy-made shoes and the contractors of penitentiary-made 
goods?" The News Letter frankly admits that it cannot see 
what it has to do with it. We have not before BO much as hinted 
that Shoemaker Crispin was charged with stealing his leather, 
and was thereby able to undersell shoemakers who bought and 
paid for their raw materials, nor have we told anybody that 
there are millionaire shoe manufacturers abroad in the land or 
penitentiary-made footwear on the market. 

It may he true — very likely it is true, as the San Francisco 
Bool and Shoemakers White Labor League says, that the million- 
aire shoe manufacturers and contractors of prison-made goods 
arc the dominating influence in the American Federation of 
Labor, for that organization docs occasionally show symptoms of 
having brains in it. as witnessed the other dav when Gorapers 
admitted that lie could not throw the vote of the Federation to 
I in. Now. if these Knights of Si. Crispin are desirous of 
living long and living happy, let each one stick to his own last 
and keep his nose out of other people's business, and above all, 
eliminate the word "white" from the League's official name. 
This is asively a white man's country. 



The Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company is to 

build a three-story building at Capp street, near Twenty-fifth. 
This will cost $31,950, and is to be used as the Mission Ex- 
chanj 



£tJu> MuBtn, HJtke mtxw 



Ella. Wheeler Wilcox shows an adaptability to her environ- 
ment which is marvelous indeed. The poetess of passion was 
lately in Los Angeles. While there, she assured the one-lungers 
that in all the world there was no land like that; in fact, she 
fairly dazed the real estate men of that section, who heretofore 
have held an undisputed championship as dispensers of what is 
popularly known as "hot air." 

Previous to this, the lady was in Honolulu, and never neg- 
lected an opportunity to assure the Hawaiians that there was 
the original site of Eden, and that there alone would she be 
willing to spend her declining years. The simple islanders were 
delighted. They attended her readings en masse, and suffered 
applaudingly, for in this life the bitter always accompanies the 
sweet. 

But, alas ! the only Ella is now sojourning in the bleak and 
wintry East, and pays her compliments to that frigid paradise in 
the following terms : 

"Oh, never is felt in that tropic clime, 
Where the singing of birds is a ceaseless chime, 
That leap of the blood and the rapture thrill 
That comes to us here with the birds' 'first trill; 
And only the eye that has looked on snows 
Can see all the beauty that lies in a rose, 
The lure of the tropics I understand, 
But ho! for the springs of my native land." 

Such shameful treachery as this I feel compelled to unmask, 
but perhaps Mrs. Wilcox is only taking pattern from her em- 
ployer. 



New Alcazar Theatre 



COR. SUTTER AND 
STE1NER STS 

BELASCO A HATER. Ownirl inH M»n.i#r. ib.cduUlr "CUll A" BniMIni 

Seventy-second week of the Alcazar Stock Company, commencing Monday, 
July 27th. Mr. White Whittlesey supported by the Alcazar players fn Eugene 
W.Presbrey's dramatization of E. W. Hornung's stories 

RAFFLES THE AMATEUR CRACKSMAN 

Prices — Evening, 25c. to $1. Matinees Saturday and Sunday, 25c. 
to 50c. 
Monday, August 3— Mr. Whittlesey in The Prisoner of Zenda. 



Orpheum 



ILLIS ST.. HEAR FILLMORE. 
ibaolaUly C1m« A 
Th«*tr» Balldlnf 



Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 

ARTISTIC VAUDEVILLE. 
Ben Welch; Basque Grand Opera Quartette; Wilbur Mack, assisted by Nella 
Walker; Fentelle and Carr; Sadie Sherman; Tom Davies Trio; Martinette and 
Sylvester; New Orpheum Motion Pictures. Last week of the Four Fords. 
Evening prices — 10. 25. 50, 75c. Box seats, $1. Matinee prices 
(except Sundays and holidays), 10, 25, 50c. Phone WEST 6000. 



Van Ness Theatre 



CORNER VAN NESS AVE. 

AND GROVE SfREET 



OOTTIOB, MARX * CO.. Prop! «nd Mgn. Phon* H>rk*t MM 

Monday July 2?. last six nights. Matinees Wednesday and Saturdav. 
THE HENRY MILLER ASSOCIATE PLAYERS 
in the greatest play of the age 

THE SERVANT IN THE HOUSE. 
Last time next Saturday night. 
August 3 — Henry Miller in the new comedy, "Mater." 




THEATRC 

PHONE 
WEST 663 



Ellis Street near Flllmort. 

Class "A" Thcatr* 
Prices — Evenings 25c, 50c, 75c 
Matinees, except Sundays and hol- 
idays. 25c and 50c. 
Matinee Saturday and Sunday. Last two nights 

THE BRIDAL TRAP & THE SONG BIRDS. 

Beginning next Monday night the New York musical comeiv hit 

THE CHAPERONS 
William Burress. May Boley. Arthur Cunningham. Alt the Princess favorites 
in the cast. 



Samuel M. Shortridge 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 
CHRONICLE BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO 

Tel. DougUs 2176 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Junk 25, 1908. 



ANITE 




Mean men were being discussed by a party of ladies in Mel- 
rose. Our cited the case of nnc in her vicinity who had a wife 
that delighted in chickens, anil the husband detested them. She 
attended the Poultry Show at Idora Park recently, and became 
so enthused that she' begged the privilege of keeping a half dozen 
— just enough to eat the table scraps. The stubborn husband 
was obdurate for a long time, but finally relented, and offered 
to loan the wife $5, with the agreement that the money was to 
be returned on the installment plan from the sale of eggs. 

Immediately be struck off the egg supply from their grocery 
list, so up to date be eats all the eggs for breakfast that he wauls. 
and the surplus are sold, and the money goes into his purse, to 
pay for the chickens, without the least qualm of conscience on. 
the husband's part. She hopes to get them paid Eor BOme day, 
but is worrying lest he charge her rent for the chicken house 
and yard soon. 

Another story that sounded a little far-fetched, but still may 
have been true, was of a Fruitvale landlord, noted for bis miserly 
ways. He bad a good paying tenant who had occupied a collage 
owned by the old fellow, for five years, at a rental of $15 
monthly. The time came, as the family circle increased, when 
another room was needed, but the owner absolutely refused to 
enlarge the house; the tenant disliked so much to move that, 
rather than do so, he offered to build on the room at his own 
expense. This seemed satisfactory, and the room was built. 

When the rent day rolled around, instead of $15, the bill was 
for $17. The tenant was furious, but the landlord insisted that 
the cottage now contained five rooms, and be would take no less 
for the house, so he could take his choice, pay it. or move. 

* * * 

Barnum is accredited by historians with saying that the peo- 
ple love to be humbugged, and from the prosperity which the 
palmists, clairvoyants and spiritualists consistently enjoy, it is 
manifest that we take an ineffable delight in being buncoed. 
There is really no harm in being humbugged for amusement at 
1 1].- circus as Barnum did it, for an hour after the lights are ex- 
tinguished one forgets what transpired in the rings; but with 
the fortune-telling sharps, veiled prophets, soul-necromancers 
and their ilk, parading their "mysterious and amazing powers" 
before the eyes of a credulous populace, day after day, with a 
grand flourish of trumpets, costly special advertising in un- 
scrupulous publications, grotesque illuminated signs, fantastic 
Oriental tapestries, and similar "impressive" devices, it seems 
rational to ask if we are retrograding instead of moving upward. 

T have seen some persons whom I thought were mentally bal- 
anced growing enthusiastic over the alleged achievements of a 
certain Piedmont medium, and from what they told me, my 
curiosity was aroused to ascertain for my own satisfaction by 
what means the notorious old hag succeeded in misleading ordi- 
narily sensible folk. Accordingly, I attended one of the regu- 
lar mid-week seances, and when 1 left the hall at the close of 
the absurd cere] ies, I could not refrain from laughing out- 
right at the ludicrous spectacle the enthusiasts presented as they 
solemnly sat in a circle, held hands, and communed with souls 
from spiritland. 

The mental calibre of those who are asses enough to contribute 
to the support of the army of mediumistic and prophetic fakers 
is plainly below the standard, for when von hear a person taking 
ilns spirit tom-foolery seriously, it is wise to be on your guard. 
lie or she lacks menial equilibrium. 

* * * 

The new municipal wharf at the foot of University avenue, 
Berkeley, which has been wider construction by the Atlantic, 
ttulf and Pacific Company, is new nearly complete, and is said 
by experts to be one of the best in the State. It is I !'.' Peel long, 
with a width of 75 feet, and is reached by concrete approaches 
2204 feet in length. The piling for the approaches is of con- 
crete, reinforced by an inside pile of fir and is regarded as in- 
destructible. Shippers will be accommodated in a large freight 
Shed, which is also nearly ready for use. It is estimated that 
at least four of the largest schooners on the Bay of San Fran- 
cisco can be accommodated at the pier at one time. 



Its 

Quality 

Unequalled 

Excellence 

Unsurpassed 




Its 

Quality 

Unequalled 

Excellence 

Unsurpassed 



LIQUEUR 

Peres Chartreux 

-GREEN AND YELLOW- 

This famous cordial, now made at Tarragona, Spain, was for centuries 
distilled by the Carthusian Monks (Peres Chartreux) at the Monastery 
of La Grande Chartreuse, France, and known throughout the world as 
Chartreuse. The above cut represents the bottle and label employed in 
the putting up of the article since the Monks' expulsion from France, and 
it is now known as Liqueur Peres Chartreux (the Monks, however, 
still retain the right to use the old bottle and label as well) distilled by 
the same order of Monks, who have securely guarded the secret of its 
manufacture for hundreds of years, taking it with them at the time they 
left the Monastery of La Grande Chartreuse, and who, therefore, alone 
possess a knowledge of the elements of this delicious nectar. No Liqueur 
associated with the name of the Carthusian Monks (Peres Chartreux) 
and made since their expulsion from France is genuine except that made 
by them at Tarragona, Spain. 

At flrst-class Wine Merchants, Grocers. Hotels. Cafes. 

Batjer & Co.. 45 Broadway, New York. N. Y. 

Sole Agents for LTnited States. 




Palo Alto Planing Mills 

Our Specialties: 
HARDWOOD INTERIORS 

cAND 

VENEERED DOORS 

Estimates cheerfully furnished 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE : 
1105 CHRONICLE BLDG. 



Jefferson 


Square Bowling 


Alleys 


and 


Billiard 


and Pi 


aol Parlors 


92s GOLDEN GATE AVE. 




CORNER OCTAVIA 




LARGEST ANC 


FINEST IN 


THE WORLD 



ANNUAL MEETING 
The Risdoit Iron and Locomotive Works 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works for 
the election of trustees for the ensuing year and the transaction of such other business 
as may be brought before the meeting, will be held at the office of the company, ay8 
Steuart St., San Francisco, on MONDAY, the 3d dav of August, 1008. at n o'clock a. nv 

' HARRY D. ROGERS. Secretary 



.h m 25, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISKK. 



13 




NIGHT BY THE SEA. 
Night's far, high altars glisten with star-fires dim and pale, 
Low at their feet I listen to the sea's confessing wail; 
It sighs and must sigh ever, with myriad weary lips, 
To tell its lore of harbors reached, or ne'er returning ships. 
The moon, a pale nun wooing pure rest 'mid night's vast aisles, 
Glides through her fires subduing their light with chastening 
smiles. 

The winds play ceaseless anthems, soft, sad or gladly free, 
Till all the soul's vague yearnings are uttered by the sea; 
The surging, urging billows, or sighing, dying foam 
Speak fiercely wild of waging wars, or sweetly sad of home; 
The sea-wraiths seek night's cover, and in its silence more 
Of mystic meanings hover than suns can e'er explore. 

The wind pleads with the wandering waves and all my erring 

hears, 
Then lulling low, my spirit laves with penitential tears; 

It seems night's high priest calls me — he bends and touches 

me, 
Until my soul sobs all it is — tells all that it would be — 
Till in the hush of sea-song, 'neath smile of moon I glow 
Willi more of God's warm presence than priest can fell or know. 

— Sadie Iloiriiiini Metcalfe. 



A BROKEN FRIENDSHIP. 

If this he friendship — thai one broken hour 
(0 fragile link in all the loving years!) 
('an cast our hearts asunder. Time appears 

Frightful indeed, since all our vaunted power, 

Wherewith we build high hope like some strong lower. 

Crumbles to dust, where earthly passion leers. 

What of our laughter? Aye. what of our tears 
Thai should have only watered Friendship's Mower ! 

If this he friendship, I can never know 

Again the magic faith I boasted of; 

One deed of mine has rnished Hie EOUSG of I.ove, 
And every stone to its old place must go. 
Shame be to our endurance if we killed 
The sinews thai can help us to rebuild. 

— Charles Hanson Towne in Harper's Bazar. 



The consulting engineers of the San Francisco Labor 

Council have approved a municipal waler system, lull have set 
their brazen faces hard as a section of galvanized aewer pipe 
against the purchase of the Spring Valley plant. On th< 
era! principle thai il is better to pay $35,000,000 tor something 
that is impractical than to gel something for your money, this 
aggregation of tinkers, tailors, bod-carriers, -.avengers, 
cleaners, sailors, roustabouts and riff-raff of the unions, pp 
to express an opinion upon a matter thai has created d 
comment among nun of intelligence and standing in the com- 
munity! Unfortunately this country is too free. There should 
he laws to suppress the effrontery of the ignorant. These horny- 
longned peasants should be taught to know their place and to 

reaped the opinions of their betters. If I had my way. I would 

compel them to doll' their hits to me whenever thev met me in 
- reet, as was their habit in the presence of their superiors in 
"ill., old country." And ii is coming to that as rapidly as the 
"labor councils" and Hie labor unions can force elass distinctions 
upon us. 



FOR SALE. 
\ bargain: Automatic addressing machine, cost $350; Rem- 
ington No. 6, (116 J 5,000 stencils. $7.50; Sundries, - 

iO. Will he sold cheap. If interested, see manager, room 
i Market street. 




FISH 

more than any other dish needs 
careful seasoning. It is rendered 
more appetizing by the use of 

Lea & Perrins 

SAUCE 

THE ORIGINAL WORCESTERSHIRE 

It is a delicate seasoning for 
Scalloped Oysters, Eroiled Lob- 
ster, Cod Fish Balls and Steaks, 
Deviled Clams, Fish, Salads, etc. 

Beware of Imitations. 

John Duncan's Sons, Agenrs, New Yolk 



J 




PLAN TO VISIT 



YOSEMITE 
VALLEY 



THIS SEASON 

NOW REACHED BY RAIL 

A quick, comfortable trip. An ideal outing amid the grandeurs of Yosemlte 



For through tickets and connections 
See Southern Pacific or Santa Fe Agent 

or Addre.i O. W. LBHMER, Traffic M.n.ficr. Merced. C.I. 



Miss Harker's School 

PALO ALTO. CALIFORNIA 

Home and day school. Certificate admits to college. Intermediate and pri- 
mary departments. New buildings; large grounds. Seventh year begins 

August, is, l 

Boone's University School for Boys 

BERKELEY 

Commences its twenty-seventh year, Monday, August 10th. Accredited to 
the University of California. Stanford. University of Michigan, Cornell and 
Pennsylvania. Apply for Catalogue to P. R. BOONE, Principal. 2029 Durant 
Ave. 



A. W. BEST 



ALICE BEST 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 



1628 BUSH STREET 



LIFE I ! 
PiY iNP SIGHT 



ILU'vTRiTIKO 

nncmra 

PAINTI50 



The now Japanese rooms (Marsh's) with rare, high Jap- 
anese art exhibit, aro now open in the Fairmont II 



DIRT IN THE HOUSb 13UILDSTHE HIGH- 
WAY TO BEGGARY." BE WISE IN TIME AND USE 

SAPOLIO 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



June 85, 1908. 




INANCIAL 




time of writing, had not manifested itself to any general de 
gree. 



Those industries of California that 
Structural Materials are devoted to the production and 
)F California. utilization of mineral structural 

materials in California, made a fine 
record for themselves last year. State Mineralogist Aubury re- 
ports that the total value represented by the output of such in- 
dustries in 1907 is $9,225,000 in round figures. The total is 
somewhat in excess of that, and the final returns may make a 
handsome addition. Practically all reports have been received, 
but in a few instances the figures have not been secured. The 
total of $9,225,000 shows a handsome increase of $1,366,000, as 
compared to the aggregate for the preceding year. The quarry- 
men and producers and workers of clay in 1907 practically added 
as much wealth to the State as did the petroleum wells of Cali- 
fornia in 1906, when petroleum was the second mineral product 
in commercial importance. 

The figures that have been received to date from the pro- 
lucers of California structural materials for the year 1907 
leave the showing without final revision, with annual records as 
follows : 

Paving blocks, $200,440; lime, $743,740: limestone, $388,014; 
cement, $2,291,077; granite, $451,085; rubble, $682,996; slate, 
$60,000; serpentine, $3,000; glass sand, $8,178.80; sandstone. 
$100,184; marble, $97,863;' clay (pottery), $219,179; brick, 
$2,965,770; macadam, $951,198.'l5. The largest increase, as 
compared to 1906 is to be credited to the brick makers, who led 
their record of the preceding year, who increased their output 
from $2,538,848 to $2,965,770, or practically $425,000. The 
lead is then taken by the cement men. whose output in 1906 
was $1,941,250, and 'in 1907 was $2,291,077, a gain of about 
$325,000. Notwithstanding that the old paving blocks in San 
Francisco were utilized in repaving the streets in that city, and 
few new ones were quarried for local use, the quarrying of pav- 
ing blocks for the entire State increased. There were increases 
in lime and limestone ; an increase of more than $100,000 in 
granite; a substantial gain in the production of macadam for the 
State; more than $100,000 increase in the rubble product; and 
clay and pottery was more in demand. 

"These returns, as received from the Statistician of the Stall' 
Mining Bureau," so says Aubury, "strongly tend to confirm 
the earlier forecast that the total mineral production of the 
State for 1907 will be found to have exceeded $50,000,000, which 
is a record of good size. The collection of statistics for 1907 is 
nearly completed. I shall follow out the plan previously men- 
tioned, to give information as early as possible to each line of 
California mineral industries concerning their accomplishments 
in 1907, which helped to accentuate the growing dignity of min- 
eral production in this State. Earnest co-operation on the part 
of all producers of mineral substances is invited in getting to- 
gether the statistics that will give due credit to our highly 
mineralized counties. Any producer who has delayed his figures 
is invited to send them in without waiting." 



The feature of the week has been the general tone of optimism 
that prevails on all the exchanges, the lead being given by Wall 
street. The strength of the market is generally good, indicative 
of improved conditions all over the country. There has been a 
broadening tendency in the bond market. There has been a 
general relief of congestion. A resumption of activity in the 
iron and steel trades in the East is having its effect, and it is 
a strong factor in re-invigorating all stocks. Money is becoming 
much more plentiful in the East, and locally there is ample 
money to be had, especially for legitimate building operations, 
many owners of realty desiring to take advantage of the momen- 
tary drop in the price of lumber and all other building materials. 

On the Bush Street Exchange, there has been a more buoyant 
and stronger tone than for many months. The sales of Satur- 
day of last week amounted to $300,000, and the transactions for 
Tuesday exceeded $500,000. Locally this support of the market 
is phenomenally strong. A reaction is expected, but up to the 



McNamara reports a big strike. Combination Fraction was 
active all the week. McNamara was a lively trader, but there 
were others in the Tonopah list. 



Attorney E. G. Withers has filed with the clerk of the "District 
Court the defendant's reply on the motion to discharge the at- 
tachment in the proceedings instituted by the Goldfield Mohawk 
Mining Company against, the Frances-Mohawk Mining and Leas- 
ing Company, and D. Mackenzie & Co. The suit was brought 
by the Mohawk Company, which demanded damages on account 
of the alleged violation of the terms of the Frances-Mohawk lease 
and the charge that the leasing company ruined ore outside of its 
boundary lines and permitted the workings to cave in a manner 
which caused great damage to the property. 



The statement of the conditions and atfairs of the Connecti- 
cut Fire Insurance Company of Hartford has been published, 
and shows a very gratifying state of atfairs. It shows total 
assets of $5,817,433.86 and total liahilities of $3,699,039.61. 

Under the head of "Income" is listed the "net cash received 
for fire premiums," "received fur interest on bond and mort- 
gages," "received from interest and dividends on bonds, stocks. 
loans and from all other sources," "received for rent." "profit 
on sale or maturity of ledger assets," to a total of $3,981,476.64. 
There was written during the year a net amount of fire risks of 
$370,696,358. B. J. Smith is the manager of the Pacific De- 
partment, with offices in the Alaska Commercial Building. 



The order for a re-trial of the Standard Oil eases is what the 
so-called "reversal" practically amounts to — with the difference 
that in any event the mulcting of the Standard, if they are made 
to pay a fine, will be based, not on ihe wealth of the corporation, 
but because of the nature of thi law's infraction, hi other 
words, the Standard will now gel a square deal. The effect on 
Wall street was magical, and a reflex "boost" has been given all 
stocks and bonds. There is no doubt whatever thai Charles M. 
Schwab is right in prophecying that we are right on the edge of 
a great prosperity wave, and that tin- Presidential conflict will 
not affect conditions one way or the oilier. Of course, we have 
pessimists, such as Stuyvesant Fish, who prediel din- disaster, 
and who swing hammers in the anvil chorus of impending harm. 
Fish, it should be remembered, was handed a large-sized lemon 
by llarriman. 



The State Mining Bureau has just issued a map of the Min- 
aret Mining District, .Madera County, California, showing all 
creeks, elevations, trails and important points. The map shows 





HIGH GRADE 


INVESTMENT S E C U RITIES 




LIST ON REQUEST 




SUTRO & CO., Brokers 


TEL. K. 332 


412 MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



J. C. Wilson, Broker 



Member Stock and Bond Exchange. Stocks 
and Bonds, Investment Securities. 482 Cali- 
fornia St., San Francisco, Kohl Building. 
Telephone Kearny 815. 



Zadig & Co., Stock Brokers 

Tonopah, Goldfield, Bullfrog, Manhattan, 
Comstock, Fairview and Rawhide Stocks. 
Have option on shares best Rawhide proper- 
ties for a few days only. 324 Bush Street. 



.Tune 25, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



15 



the local on of large deposits of iron. This map may be obtained 
from the State Mining Bureau for '.' || cents, and an additional 
2 eenl stamp Eor postage. This is the very [east in £he way of 

a map for that amount of money, ll is poorlj drawn, badly 
engraved, and miserably printed. It shows no townships, and 
altogether is :1 disgrace to (he Bureau. 



The London-Paris National Rank report up to the close of 
business July 15, 1908, shews a very healthy slate of affairs, an 
improvement over the conditions obtaining at the same lime last 
year. This bank is the successor of the London, Paris and 
American Bank, Ltd., and has a capital stock of $3,500,000 and 
a surplus of $620,000. Its deposits amount to $7,693,266.40 for 
the year. It has resources amounting to $ll;247,266.40. The 
London Paris National Bank enjoys a most careful and con- 
servative management. 



^The graduates of the University of California are prepar- 
ing to carry on an active campaign in every county of the State 
in the interests of that institution, particularly in the matter 
of increased financial support. One of the chief questions that 
they have taken up is that of an adequate building for the Col- 
lege of Agriculture on the campus at Berkeley. The university 
authorities have been working for such a building for years with- 
out success, so that the alumni, now about 7,500 strong, have 
decided to take the matter up. It will be remembered that it 
was through the efforts of the alumni that the two cent tax, 
from which the chief source of revenue to the university from the 
State is derived, was adopted unanimously by the State Legisla- 
ture in 1897. It is now proposed to awaken popular interest 
and sentiment to the needs of the University's agricultural in- 
terests in the same way that favorable opinion was created for 
the taxation bill. With this end in view, the Council, which con- 
stitutes the governing body of the Alumni Association and directs 
its policies, have been working for the past, year, and through 
their efforts and the eo-operation of local alumni, the Republi- 
can County Committee of Modoe County incorporated in their 
platform a plank favoring increased State aid for educational 
purposes, and particularly favoring the erection of an Agricul- 
tural Building at Berkeley. An effort will be made in other 
counties to secure similar recognition of the university's agri- 
cultural needs by both parties. The council intend to carry on 
their plans on absolutely non-partisan lines. 

The President of the Association is Edmond O'Neill, of the 
famous class of '79, while the general business management and 
uni'k of directing the organization is in the hands of Gurden 
Edwards, '07, the Alumni Secretary, who baa established the 
genera] offices of the association at Berkeley. 



A COMMUNICATION. 



Editor — Will you kindly request your readers I speci- 

mens to the Entomologist of the University of California, Ber- 
keley, tor identification in any ease where ants are unusuallj 
troublesome? The reason Eoi this request is the facl thai the 
Argentine Anl has recently gained B foothold in at least four 
localities in the State. 

The Argentine Anl is much more persistenl and annoying 

than an\ of our oative species, besides being i nace to 

Horticulturists. Wherever they occur, lines of these ants can b< 
seen going up and down the trunks at nearlj every tree in the 
neighborhood. 

The Experiment Station has in preparation a circulai 
will give a full accounl oi Ihe insect and will be sent free to any 
residents of She State who desire a copy. 
Yours respectfully, 
C. W. WOODWORTH, Entomoloa 



The summer season at the Rafael is a brilliant one. There 

are am number ol amusements, and the country affords numer- 
ous opportunities for exploration by foot or on horseback. The 

With city people, and the casino is pa- 
ly by the auto enthusiasts who have mad.' the Rafael the 
vous in Marin County. The Rafael grounds an beauti- 
ful this year, and there is no pleasanter pis 



E. B. Courvoisier, frame maker. 1374 Sutter street, bet. 

Van Ness and Franklin. Allow me to estimate on your regilding 



TO DEFEND AN INDUSTRY. 

The California Grape Growers' Association is the direct out- 
come of the various articles published in Ihe News Letter to 
show the imminent danger to our grape industries through I lie 
efforts of the prohibit ionists. It is absolutely necessary lo lighi 
lire with fire, and organization is the right and proper thing. 
Mr. Andrea Sharhoro, Mr. Theodore Grier, Mr. J. B. Overton 
and \V. B. Sink, made speeches at the initial meeting on Wed- 
nesday, at which the following officers were elected: 

President, John B. Overton; first vice-president, Clarence 
Wetmore; second vice-president, E. CI. Prieber; treasurer, John 
B. Overton; directors, Andrea Sbarboro, A. E. Burnham, W. C. 
Chisholm, C. P. Wendte, M. P. Tarpey, Theodore Gier, C. L. 
La Rue, T. T. Swett, John B. Kerwin, Clarence Wetmore, E. C. 
Prieber and J. B. Overton. 



SECURITY SAVINGS BANK 



31S MONTGOMERY STREET, 



San Francisco, Cal. 

Authorized Capital - - - 

PAID UP CAPITAL 

SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS . 



$1,000,000.00 



.$500,000.00 
..332,000.00 



Interest at 
the rate of 



4 



per cent 
per annum 



WAS PAID ON DEPOSITS FOR G MONTHS ENDING 
JUNE 30, 1908. 

DIRECTORS: WM. BAKCOCK, S. L. ABBOT, O. D. BALDWIN, 
JOSEPH D. GRANT, E. J. McCUTCHEN, L. F. MONTBAGLE, 
R. H. PEASE. WARREN D. CLARK, JAMES L. FLOOD, FRED 
W KAY. J. A. DONOHOE. JACOB STERN. 
I J 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Savage Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location nf principal pi; »f business. San FranciSCO, California. 

Location of works, Virginia City, Storey County, Nevada 

Notice is hereby given thai at a meeting of the Board of Directors, 
held "ii the 22d day of July. 1808, an assessment (No. 1:!) of ten (10) 
cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable Immediately Id I oited States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 

office Of the company, room 116, No. 339 Bush street, San Francisco, 
California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 

27TH DAY OF AUGUST, 1908, 
will be delinquent iblic auction, and unless 

before, will be sold on FRIDAY, the l itii da] of Sep- 
i. r,,i.. , I'm--., to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost of 
i islng and expenses of sal-. 
Bj order of th- Board ol Directors. 

JOHN \V. TWIGGS, So n I 
dee— Room 116, 339 Bush street. San Francisco, California. 



HOME SWEET H0HT 




The home that has a modern talking machine might say they never 
neeJ go anywhere for amusement. It will furnish dance music, tell 
funny stories, render the old ballads, give selections from grand opera, 
etc.. etc., in a marvelous manner. The Reginaphone will do all this and 
in addition furnish the sweet music of the best Music Box made. 

Do you know that we carry ALL the standard makes of talking Machines 
and ALL the records ALL the time, and sell at the lowest prices? 

If you do not own one of these wonderful home entertainers you surely- 
must not be familiar with our easy payment plan, which enables anybody 
—no matter how small their income — to possess one. 

Better come in today and have the Edison. Victor, Columbia. Regina. 
phone etc. . demonstrated side I y side so that you can choose for yourself 
which you prefer. We don't try to sell you any one particular make 
here . We have them all and you can take your choice. 

E1LERS MUSIC COMPANY 

975 Market Street, 



San Francisco 



ie 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



.Tune 35. 1908. 




A friend who has been with the Sierra Club in King's River 
Canyon, but who left before the res! of the party came out of 
the canyon, tells me that Orville Pratt joined the party a day or 
two before she left. The young man is generally supposed to be 
on the way to Europe with his bride (Miss Emily Wilson), but 
my friend assures me that such is not the case. 

"Why, how can I be mistaken." she says, "when for four years 
T was a student at the University of California with Orville? To 
be sure, he went to Oxford for a year or two after that, and ac- 
quired a more-than-English accent so that his old classmates fre- 
quently feel the need of an interpreter. Bui we managed to rec- 
ognize him in spite of his English disguise. Of course, we did 
not know of his secret marriage to Miss Wilson at Martinez, as 
newspapers do not reach us. and he himself. I am sure, had on 
idea when I left that the cat was out of the bag. 11 is plan then 
was lo slay several weeks longer in the canyon, but when he 
finds that the newspapers have pried out his secret, and that his 
wife's mother and family have decided that the only thing for 
him to do is to join his wife in Europe, I suppose that lie will 
leave the Sierra Club and slip away to the Continent. He has 
always seemed distinctly conventional, but the manner of his 
marriage shows an unconventional crink in his make-up which is 
out of drawing with the picture T have had in my mind ever 
since our first college days." 

There can be no question, then, that the newspaper supposi- 
tion that young Pratt joined his bride and her mother when the 
train reached Sacramento is incorrect. Instead, he was one of 
the merry party of young people who went across the bay to say 
au revoir to Mrs. Wilson and her daughter, and without a hint 
to any one of their real relationship, they parted. A relative of 
Mrs. Wilson's tells me that Emily told her mother of her mar- 
riage when the train reached Chicago, and that Mrs. Wilson 
frantically wired her family here for advice. They told her that 
the news was already public property here, and were surprised 
at her query about Mr. Pratt's whereabouts, as the family here 
had believed the newspaper reports that he had joined them up 
the line. When advised that he was with the Sierra Club, I am 
told that Mrs. Wilson at once wrote to him to come and claim 
his bride and extended her blessing. Word travels slowly along 
the King's River, but when it reaches him, Mr. Pratt will no 
doubt hasten across the pond. Of all the latter-day romances in 
San Francisco society, this is certainly the most like a eontinued- 
in-our-next story that has come under my notice. 

I hear that Miss Helen de Young has written to several girl 
friends denying the insistent rumor that she will be married to 
Mr. Cameron in September in Paris. His trip to Europe natu- 
rally lent color to this supposition, and as there is a difference 
in religious faith, it was reasoned that perhaps a small wedding 
would seem imperative anyway, and it might as well be cele- 
brated on the other side. But this reasoning. [ am assured. 
starts on shaky premises, as Mr. Cameron is more than willing 
to comply with all the necessary demands made in a ease of this 
sort by the church to which bis fiancee belongs. Miss de Young 
did at one time, I believe, contemplate a marriage in Paris, as 
they could then continue their honeymoon travel abroad, but she 
has now given up the idea, as her brother and her mother's peo- 
ple could not be present at the wedding. But in spite of these 
very natural reasons presented by the young lady herself, society 
would not be in the least surprised if she should change her 
mind, and the marriage occur after all on the other side. In 
so many ways it would be preferable, that the young people 
may after all forego the presence of relatives. 

Miss Lily Lawlor has taken up her residence at the Burliu- 
game Club, to the surprise of society in general, who though! 
that she would be the house guest of the William Crockers. Miss 
Lawlor came out here primarily to continue Miss Ethel Crocker's 
singing lessons, as her mother did not wish her music inter- 
rupted. The Sharons have opened their new country home, and 
Miss Lawlor is their frequent guest. 

The Peter D. Martins will not attempt Newport this summer, 



but will sail immediately for Europe, after a visit of a week 01 
1 wo with Mrs. Martin's mother, Mrs. Charles Oelrichs, at New- 
port. Both Peter and Waiter .Martin have spent lie- greater part 
of their time the last few months in southern Oregon, where 
they have large land interests. 

The return of Miss Cecilia O'Connor from abroad has been 
the signal for the gathering of the elan in which the O'Connor 
sisters played such important parts before they were infected 
with the travel microbe, and learned to call "home" here, there, 
or anywhere. Miss Celia is at present the house-guest of Mrs. 
R. P. Schwerin, but will go over to San Rafael next week. Like 
her other sisters, she is an old-time chum of Mrs. Herman Oel- 
richs, and always visits her coming or going abroad. 

Templeton Crocker, I hear, is very sensitive about being teased 
on his cross-the-continent motor trip. He gave it up when half- 
way across, and came on in a private car. The adventures of 
Mr. Crocker and the voting men who accompanied him are de- 
liriously funny, every mishap known to horseless locomotion 
having overtaken them. The young chaps who accompanied him 
are stunning young fellows, class-mates at college, and are at 
present at Uplands, where Miss Jennie Crocker is dispensing 
hospitality. Her cousins, the Alexander girls. Templeton and 
bis friends, and one or two of Miss Jennie's inl imates, make up 
a merry party to keep dull care away. On Monday night of this 
week, Mr. Crocker was host tit a dinner party at the St. Francis. 

An interesting engagement which was announced in Fresno is 
of equal interest in all the hay cities, as it concerns itself with 
the heart affairs of Miss Dolly Tarpey ami Mr. .1. Paulding Ed- 
wards. 'J'he Tarpey faintly have long been identified with the 
political affairs of California, and Mr. Edwards is the son of 
Mrs. Henry A. Butters by her first marriage. His sisters look 
the name of their step-father, hut be preferred to retain his own 

name. I am told that Mi'. Butters ha- been equally generous to 
him. Now that the Butters have come to the parting of their 
ways, the young man probably congratulates himself on bis 

choice of name. He has a handsome home in Piedi it wailing 

for his bride. 



Among the arrivals at the St. James Hotel, San .Jose, from 
San Francisco for the week ending July lsth. were: C. A. War- 
ner, E. B. Patterson, s. Meyer, D. Van Gilder, A. .1. Bledsoe, 
B. .1. Kalin, L. M. McKinlcv. S. G. Cook. .1. E. Hardy, F. F. 

Fitch. W. R. Sampson. B. I. Bill, I'. II. I: h. B. A. Steininger, 

F. II. Elster, A. II. Lyons, E. I,. Etitson, Harry Howard. A. I.. 
Brooks, Win. A. Sexton, F. ('. Mimm, c. K. Westlake, Walter K. 
Wilson. R. <;. Downs, D. ('. Longwill, R. A. Davenport, K. J. 
Albert, F. R. Morgan. ('. E. Meringer. Frank Zerrazzi, George 
Price, Mr. and Mrs. P. .1. v.,>r. John 1.'. Conway, Dr. Clarence 
Ward, Dr. E. N. Short, Arthur Thornton, Mr. and Mrs. Haig 
Patigian, Mr. and Mis. Bush Finite II. A. Eawrie Xoung, J. Allen 
Johnson. 

An important political conference was held recently at the 

Fairmont by a number of the st prominent Republican lead- 
ers. Among litem were Governor James M. Gil let t, United 
Slates Senator Perkins, Congressmen McKinley and Kahn. 

General George S. Stone, P. S. Teller. Oscar Lawlor of Eos 

Angeles, ami United States Districi Attorney Devlin of San 
Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Mclsaacs are spending a lew days at the 
Hotel Colonial, prior lo leaving for a shorl visit lo Chicago. 

A very pleasant patty, composed of Mr. ami Mrs. John I). 
Foster and Mr. and Mrs. 11. D. Lombard, of Los Angeles, have' 
been spending the past \'vw days al the Fairmont. Among Ih-t 

other guests registered fr the city of the Angels were: John 

-[the peninsula]- 

SAN MATEO, CALIFORNIA 

A Twentieth Century Hotel of the Highest Degree of excellence. Amer- 
ican and European plan. Open February 22, '08. Thirty minutes by 
rail from San Francisco. Located In a Beautiful Park of thirty years' 
cultivation. All the charm and delight of the country combined with the 
attractions and conveniences of the metropolis. For reservations or 
Information address 

J AS. H. DOOLITTLE, Manager 

San Mateo, California 



June 35, 1908.' 



AM) CALIFORNIA ADVERTISE!*. 



1: 



II. Hoffman, Mr. Mini Mrs. P. I'.. Neefus, Mr. and Mrs. .1. M. 
Neefus, B. R. Baldwin, Mrs. .1. K. Ferrall, Mrs. Fred Door and 

Miss |i ■. P.. .1. Stanton and Mrs. Stanton, with their two 

daughters and son. Mr. and Mi-. J. E. Stearns. 

Mr. ami Mrs. \Y. II. Stewart ami family of Los Angeles are 
located at the Hotel Colonial fur the Bummer months. 

Among the prominent society people recently at the Fairmont 
were ('. B. Alexander ami Mrs. Alexander and (heir three daugh- 
ters, Ha' Misses Harriet, Janatta am] Mary Crocker Alexander, 
with their valets ami maids. They made the trip In the coasi 

in the private car of Miss Jennie ( Irocker, who went in diately 

to her San Mateo home, "The Uplands." 



.1 Delineation of Del Monte Doings. 

There have been a great many foreigners and a large number 
of tourists as well as the regular summer contingent at Del 
Monte during the past week. The Cortelyou (Hub of Brooklyn, 
N. Y.. which is comprised of residents of New York State, ar- 
rived at Del Monte during the week from Southern California. 
There were a hundred and thirty-five in the party, and the morn- 
ing following their arrival they made the trip around the seven- 
teen mile drive and left on the noon train for San Francisco 
from whence they will go East over the Great Northern, taking 
in the Yellowstone Park en route. 

A party of interesting foreigners who are making a trip 
around the world arrived a I Del Monte on Saturday, and spciil 
several days. The parly included General-Lieutenant von Sal- 
ilei n-Ablimb. W. Gelka Botzen, F. Metzner, Mrs. E. Knippen- 
berg, Dr. Boadecker of Germany; Miss E. Larrain, Miss A. Lar- 
ra.in. If. Larrain, of Paris, and Mrs. .1. (I. Kneische of Berlin. 

Mrs. Prank Pixley, whose husband wrote the comic opera. 
"The Prince of Pilsen," was al Del Monte for a few days las! 
week with her friend. Mrs. N. II. Truett, of New York. Mr. 
ami Mrs. Edward Lande, of San Prancisco, were at the Hotel 
Del Monte for a short visil recently. Edward (). Schmiedell 
went down to Del Monte lasi Saturday, and spent the week-end 
willi bis mother, Mrs. Henry Schmiedell. 

Among those who motored to Del Monte from Los Augeles 
lasi week were .Mr. and Mrs. If. ( '. McCormick, Mr. and Mrs. 
John ('. ('line, .1. Banning ('line. II. W. ('line. Charles F. Hoey, 
Mr. and Mrs. John l>. Foster ami Mr. and Mrs. H. 1>. Lombard. 

Mr. and Mrs. Titer Martin have engaged accommodations at 

Did Monle for the balance of I lie summer season. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Bachman are settled at Del Monte for 

Ibc summer. 



THE STAR HAIR REMEDY, the best tonic; restores color to gray 
hair; stops falling; cures dandruff; grows new hair. All druggists. 



Hotel St. Francis 



Anticipating every demand 

of the most exacting 

nature. 



Coder tha m.nanement •( JAMES WOODS 



The select. Hotel of San Francisco 

HOTEL COLONIAL 

STOCKTON STREET ABOVE SUTTER 

American and European Plan 
Special rates to permanents 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Manager 

Telephone Kearny 4754 



WHY 


NOT MAKE YOUR HOME AT THE 


H o 


Lei Jefferson 




TURK AND COUGH STREETS 

Facing Jefferson Square 


A superior class holel with every moJern convenience and comfort. Operated on 
the American and European plans. Special rates to permanent guests, special 
attention paid to the table— We invite comparisons. Management Noah H, Grav. 
formerly manager Alexander Young Hotel. Honululu and H'Uel Poller. Santa Bar- 
bara. 




You Can Live At. The Hotel Jefferson 
Better And For Less Than AL Home 




VACATION QUESTIONS QUICKLY SETTLED 



Call or write to Dept. 
Ad. 948 Flood Build- 
ing for literature and 
beautifully illustrated 
booklets nil California 
Resorts and Outing 
Places. 

Rowing, Bathing, Fish- 
ing, Camping, Excellent. 
Hotels 

SOUTHERN 
PACIFIC 

Ticket offices 

"4 .Market St.. U Powell 

St., Ferry Depot. 



IS 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTBE 



June 25, 1908. 



Thomas J. O'Brien, United States Ambassador to Japan, 
who has been staying at the St. Francis since his arrival on the 
Korea, left the other day for a visit at his home in Grand Rapids. 
Michigan. 

Mr. H. 1). Bradley, a prominent San Francisco attorney, spent 
the week-end at the Peninsula. 

Rear-Admiral Clover, U. S. N. (retired), and Mrs. Clover, 
were at the St. Francis with their family for a few days last 
week, visiting local friends. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Gregory and Mr. F. II. Goodby, Miss Cul- 
len and Miss 10. ](. Sehmitt, prominent New Yorkers, 'are at the 
Peninsula. 

The St. George Careys, of Auburn, Cal., are at the Fairmont 
for an indefinite period, preparatory to an extended trip to Eng- 
land'and the famous Isle of Guernsey, where Mi-. Carey's family 
have had extensive holdings for many years. Mrs. Carey, who 
was Miss Florence Trent, is very talented and popular, and has 
a host of friends in this city. 

.Mr. J. C. Phillips, auditor of the Anaconda interests at Butte, 
Montana, is a guest at the Peninsula. 

Morris Bien, supervising engineer of the Government Recla- 
mation Service, who met Secretary Garfield upon his return from 
the islands, is back at the St. Francis alter a visit to the interior. 

Mr. Oscar Grant, of Paris, France, is a guest at the Penin- 
sula. Mr. Grant will marry Miss Eteyneman of San Mateo next 
month. 

Matthew r Bender, Jr., Albany, N. Y., publisher, has been visit- 
ing at the Hotel St. Francis with his wife and children. 

Among the guests registered at Hotel Rafael for the week 
ending July 19th were: Charles \V. Haas, AVm. L. McGuire, 
Mr. and Mrs. Hacker, L. Byone, A. A. Brown, Wm. Adams, Miss 
E. Johnson, Miss J. Volkman, Mr. II. A. Schmidt, Mr. W. G. 
Volkman, 1>. G. Volkman, Mr. and Mrs. V. E. Bogue, Malcolm 
Bogue, llr. Hirschfelder and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Mandel, Mr. 
and Mrs. Phillip. 

Mrs. Louis Scliwabacher and daughter, Mrs. Carl Raiss, have 
returned to the Peninsula, San Mateo, after spending a week 
at Lake Tahoe. 

Miss Nance O'Neill, the well-known tragedienne, and her man- 
ager, MeKee Rankin, are guests at the St. Francis, during Miss 
O'Neill's engagement in San Francisco. 

Mrs. G. C. Phmney and two sons, A. A. and W. C. Phinney, 
Stanford University students, are summer guests at the Pe- 
ninsula. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alexis Ehrman are at the Peninsula for several 
weeks. 

Charles-Rann Kennedy, the popular playwright, accompanied 
by the Henry Miller associate players appearing in the mosl 
notable play of the year, "The Servant in the House," is regis- 
tered ai the St. Francis. 

Miss E. Marion Warren, the heiress, will make Iter home at the 
Peninsula, San Mateo, after August 1st. 

John J. Byrne, Assistant Traffic Passenger Manager of the 
Santa Fe R. R., is registered at the St. Francis with Mrs. Byrne. 

The Peter D. Martins, with a train of servants, went to San 
Mateo last week. They have taken several suites of the choicest 
rooms at the Peninsula Hotel, including a private dining room 
and nursery. 

R. V. Taylor, General Manager of the Mobile and Ohio R. R., 
is at the St. Francis with Mrs. Taylor and his family. 

Mrs. James Sydney Peck, who has been at the St. Francis 
since her arrival in San Francisco, will visit her son-in-law and 
(laughter, Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Hubbard, at Bremerton, before 
returning in her home in the East. 

Mrs. A. 1'. Redding is at home again al the Peninsula. San 
Mateo, after having spenl several days in a local hospital, where 
she underwent an operation lor appendicitis. 



Musirdle "I Del Monte. 

Yesterday, Friday evening, July 24th, a musical was given 
at Hotel Del Monte in which some of the best talent in this part 
of the State made an appearance. Among those mi tin- pro- 
gramme were: Mr. Charles Trowbridge, tenor, who sings in the 
Trinity Church choir of this city: Miss Agatha Grev Cuininings, 
contralto; Mrs. Emeretta Sybrant, lyric soprano; Mr. Harry 
Lawrence, bass; Mrs. Mary Weaver McCauley. soprano; Miss 
Adele Davis, accompanist. The regular weekly dance this Sat- 
urday night is sure to prove enjoyable to the city folks who go 
down for the week-end vacations. 



ENNEN'S SSHSi 
N&WDER 




PRICKLY HEAT 

CHAFING, and 
SUNBURN, SrWft 

"A Knit hi 






t*. ii '• Bmumm ill odoroFptiiel- 
1lwl 



GERHARD HEjWgj CO., Ntwirk, N. )■ 





10$ 


10% 


10% 


* 1 


10fo 


Taft & Pennoyer's 

Semi-Annual 
Discount Sale 

Commencing Wednesday, July 8 

A general discount of ten per cent will be given on all 

goods purchased during July. 
This discount does not apply on the many lines of 

goods already specially reduced more than 10 

per cent. 
The few exceptions are goods sold "net" under con- 
tract with the manufacturer, muslins, sheetings, etc. 

14th at BROADWAY 

After October 1 in our new store at Clay, 14th to 15th 


10% 


10f 


lOfo 


10% 




10% 


10% 


10% 






The wonderful new talking 
machine without a horn 

The top closes over the record, shutting out all the 
noise of operation — the pure music of the record comes 
from a mahogany sound reflector. Elegantly made of 
solid mahogany, combined with record cabinet forijso 
records. 1 he finest talking machine made. Sendi for 
booklet. 

Price $200 



Sherman Ray & Go. 

Suinwav Pianos—Victor Talking Machine! 
KEARNY AND SUTTER. S. F. 
Broadway al 13th 1635 Von Ness Av« 

Oakland San Francisco 



Millbrae Kennels millbrae, calif 




Twenty minutes from 'Frisco opposite S. P. Station and San Mateo Electric at 
Millbrae: backed by ten square miles of heathei fields where the dogs are 
exercised twice daily. 

Supervised by G. S. Haliwel! who continues to breed and sell high class 
Boston Terriers and Bull Dogs. 

jf you wish to BOARD, BUY or BREED a good dog call or write 



The Millbrae Kennel Go. 



Office— Roor 
251 Kearnv, c 



210, Cochrane and Bull Bldg. 
r. Bush. Phone Douglas 1037. 



Jone 25, 1908. 



AND CALIPOENIA ADVERTISER. 



19 



A (Boob iExample 



The authorities in New York, not content with tabooing bet- 
ting at (lie race tracks, and leading a stirring crusade against 
(he poolroom clique, have inaugurated, through the postal de- 
partment, a worthy campaign against the professional "touts," 
familiarly .characterized as tipsters, and il is expected that with- 
in a very short time a hard blow will be dealt to the learned and 
resourceful gentlemen who for years have been reaping a golden 
harvest from the credulous thousands. The victims of this well- 
organized and established graft have been paying money for 
what has been, and is still advertised, as sure winner tips. Sev- 
eral of the fakers have been put out of business, but a few are 
still hanging on, staggering against the greatest handicap which 
could have been given them, a denial of the use of the mails. 



While the police officials have been close on the heels of 
the poolroom men, chasing them from pillar to post, raid- 
ing their dens now and then, and nearly always ready to 
pounce upon them should they start business on a large 
scale, the postoffice inspectors have been running the tip- 
sters to earth, and their job is almost completed. 



Over fifty fraud orders have been issued, and an equal num- 
ber of names of more or less known tipsters have been posted on 
the blacklist of the postal department. Hundreds of thousands 
of letters addressed to these tipsters have been seized, and the 
besl known of all the professional tipsters have been notified 
thai I hey can never again use the mails. One tipster has gone 
to jail, and most of the others are casting about for other lines 
of work. 

There is no set of men identified with horse racing which have 
reaped a richer harvest than these professional tipsters. For 
many years they operated undisturbed. Their system was sim- 
ple enough. It consisted in advertising in some of the sporting 
newspapers that they could give a tip on a sure winner in one of 
the races for the day. 'The price charged for the information 
ranged all the Way from one dollar to five. The patrons of these 
men numbered fens of thousands. Thej bad lew steady patrons, 
for the so-called information they sold was oo( of a nature to 
inspire continued confidence. Bui their advertisements were 
alluring — very. High-priced writers were employed to write 
advertisements to attract the army of pikers. The lipping busi- 
ness was in full swing four years ago, when an inspector was sent 
to New York from Chicago in charge oi the New York office, lie 
noticed the pretentious advertisements of the tipping bureaus 
and agencies, ami came across some names with which he was 

familiar. lie recognized then BS men he had conic across in 

Chicago. Some of (he names he discovered had been identified 
with the infamous green-goods came. The advertisemen 

scanned closely for main wi b B I allegations of the tip- 

sters as (o pa si performances were I"" 1 ., d into. 1 1 was found thai 

B great many of these boast* "i having picked winner- on pre- 
ceding ,\:l\ 9 were fa Is.-. I I WAS found UlS 

would advertise one day under one name, and the next day under 
another, sometimes changing the number of the offices to which 
money could be sent. [I was found thai a syndicate i 
and thai a do en or more of the professional tipsters were work- 
ing in harmony lo fieece the public. Such is the - 
crusade in Wen Fori fl K about San Francisco"! 
have the "immaculate" daily press, the Examiner, el al., 

be business of the tipping lakers, and T. Fisher. Jerry's 

I. the Mini Handicap. Fred Nonas. Ex-Owner Johnstone, 

and a do/en others are reaping a substantial income from their 

ed game. In a recent ii-sue of the Examiner appear- lb' 
following alluring invitation to nibble ai the tipster's bait: 
FISH BR. 

those who are sending me their 'phone 
number and address in order to have m\ in 
tree, please address our mail in future to T. Fisher, I'. 0. Bos 

V' '.'. San Francisco, t'al." 

And ii is highly probable thai an army of easily-stuck "s 
will pi Fisher's invitation, and see if thej can make 



ning on a long shot. Verily, ii is lo laugh! 

Once Fisher gets the name and address of an ''interested" 
better, you can rest assured he will see lo it that bis "free tip" is 
not to be the culminating negotiation between himself and the 
player. He will be very punctual in peddling his next "good 
thing." 

The Examiner also contained the following lilerary gem: 

A MORAL CINCH. 

"Morse owner in Seattle will put one over Saturday, al odds 
about 15-1. We don't sell you a tip, you don't pay a cent, except 
25 per cent of your winnings after the race is over. If you want 
to be in on a killing, where everything is arranged, so that the 
result is beyond question, call or phone to city representative 
Buxton, 1264 O'Farrell street. Phone West 8301. Hours 10-'.', 
4-9. 



A Moral Cinch. 



One of those inevitable, safe-beyond- 
the-peradventure-of-a-douht species 
of "good things," for which the as- 
tute and miracle-making Buxton charges nothing, absolutely 
nothing, remember, except twenty-five per cent of your winnings 
after the race is over ! 

Here is, indeed, a brilliant object, lesson in the methods of 
up-to-date gambling finance. 

Then come Marion & Co., of 942 Van "Ness avenue, with the 
following announcement, published likewise in the Examiner: 

ANNOUNCEMENT. 

Marion wants every one that plays the races to have a bet down 
on his special for to-day. It is guaranteed, and should it fail 
to win, you are entitled to his next specials free. Stable con- 
nections expect a big price on this one. Marion & Co., Room 215 
Delbert Block, 943 Van Ness avenue. 

From which it will be seen that Marion is Johnny-on-the-spot 
with a real, live, can't-lose caballo. 

What about the use of the San Francisco wails, Mr. Inspector 
O'Connell? 

Don't you think a little entertainment for the tipsters would 
be in order? 

What about barring the daily paper that advertises these 
frauds from the mails. Mr. Inspector O'Connell, What about 
your inspectors doing their duty in San Francisco, Mr. Postmas- 
ter-General? What about your Postmaster-General, Mr. Theo- 
dore Strenuous Roosevelt? What is sauce for the New York 
goose should lie same for the San Francisco gander, and they 
should both fry in the same pan. 



DR. HOLLAND'S PRAYER. 

(iod give us men. A lime like this demands 

Slr.mgniinds.great hi Fa ill and ready hands. 

Men whom the lust of office does not kill: 

Men whom the spoils of office cannot buy: 

Men who possess opinions and a will: 

Men who have honor and who will not lie: 

Men who can stand b 

And seom his treacherous flatteries without win 

Tall men, sun-crowned, who live above lb 

In public duty and in private thinking. 



Qt icK Work. 



A despatch in the papers 

the jurors in the trial of I'riiii 

Eulenberg in Germany were selected 

in less than ten minutes, and that they were composed, of 
inics, manufacturers and directors in business concerns. 
This is really mot ling. In this country, with its hordes 

of professional jurymen and it- injection obsessed law- 

yers, if is no uncommon accomplishmi single jury- 

man in ten hours. 

Evidently, in the selection of this German jury to try 
in which one of the proudest noblemen of the Empire was ac- 
cused of a repulsive crime, the members of the panel were not 
as to their view- ion of an heredi- 

tary aristocracy ; the] isked whether their first cousin's 

brother was evtr in the employ of the noble defendant, or any 
of the thousand and one questions which an- commonplaces with 
a-. Verily, it is more i isy for a camel t'' ugh the eye 

needle than for a jut 
court in America. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



June 85, 1908. 




tolOME 



y-\ 



Horses, with their good horse sense, have come, generally 
speaking, to take kindly to the motor car. This was the main ob- 
jection to the modern vehicle, in the beginning, but now that that 

difficulty is to a great extent overc tin- cry line been raised, 

with re or less reason, that the automobile is destructive to 

roads and highways. Ii would be foolish to attempt to assert 
thai the automobile does no damage to the roads, and equally as 
foolish I" ignore the damage done to the roadways, by the pound- 
ing of steel 1 oofs, or the cutting of the road-bed with narrow, 
steel-rimmed wheels. The tire- of wagons, and in fact all horse- 
drawn vehicles, are absurdly narrow for the amount of weight 
that i- carried, winch must cause wear and tear, but this is said 
in be legitimate, and the wear and (ear of the big rubber tires of 
the motor car is claimed to be nothing less than destruction. Ii 
is granted that the automobile dues more or less damage to the 
roads, especially at the curves, but to admit to half of what is 
claimed by the detractors of the motor car would mean to damn 
it forever, and if many of the accusations were founded on fact, 
il would be necessary to rebuild every much-traveled automobile 
mad ai least, once in every two years. When a careful study is 
m ide of the nature of the damage caused by the horse and its 
load, it is quite evident that, in proportion to its speed, the 
horse is more destructive than the auto. In one ease there 
is the pounding of steel-shod hoofs with a force amounting to 
many hundreds of foot-pounds a minute, as the average horse 
weighs in the neighborhood of three-quarters of a ton. and lifts 
i - foot several indies from the ground, while in the ease of the 
automobile, there is the smooth rolling of the soft rubber tire. It 
stands to reason that a rubber tool would not be selected to work 
stone with, yet ii is claimed that a rubber tire breaks the stone 
of the roadway. Then again, the claim is made that the steel 
studs or projections of non-skid propositions cut into the road. 
No thought, however, is taken of the soft rubber back of the 
steel -iinls. and in consistency, think of the shoes of the horse, 
as they dig into the road surface. The steel studs may lie harder 
than the stone of the road, but they do not strike it a blow, merely 
rolling over it, with, of course, a pressure, but the soft sub- 
stance, the tire, gives, thus taking the bulk of the pressure unto 
itself. Observe any "single-track roadway" and note the distinct 
trough the horse has dug tor itself in the center of the road, am] 

which lie is loathe to abandon, unless kept t le side by Ids 

driver. The damage done by the wagon tire is infinitely greater 
than that done by the hoofs id' the liorse, for it cuts a deeper and 



Oldsmobile 



The car of staid value. No radical 
changes from year to year. 

Refining and strengthening— the 
Oldsmobile policy. 



IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 

Model X2--35 H. P. $2150.00 
M--40 H. P. £2900.00 
Z--60 H. P. $4380.00 



Pioneer Automobile Co. 



524 20lb St.. 
Oakland 



901 Golden Gate Ave. 
San Francisco 



wider rut on belli sides id' the road alike. Long before am one 
thought of the automobile, men who knew what they were talk- 
ing about preached wide tires, and attempts were made in pass 
a law to this effect, but most of these attempts were wasted. The 
most rabid can scarcely urge any argument against the automo- 
bile while i; is standing against the curb, yet the horse, with his 

1 Fa, pounds and paws, in his impatience or to rid himself of the 

dies. It is conceded that the automobile docs some damage; 
with its speed, it causes the liner particles of the road to he 
lilted bodily, and these will be Seen to lie following the wl Is 

as it rolls along. In a lesser degree, thai happens on a mac- 
adamized road, hut it is necessary to drive the car at the rate 



It Pays to Know the AUTOCAR 




A 

Business 
Proposition 



Walter C. cTVIorris 

WESTERN DISTRIBUTOR 

640 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco 



TYPE XV— $1350 



J ONE 85, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



21 



of from forty I" sixty miles an hour, which is seldom done, e 

on a track. It is unfortunate thai there have no! been i <■ 

in reus opportunities to actually compare the damage dona 

by both. However, a single illustration is strong enough in its 
results to convince. The Champs-Elysees, Paris, is divided into 
three driveways, the central one used exclusively by automobiles, 
while the outer cues are for horse traffic. The experience of ;i 
year has shown that a very much higher rale of speed is main- 
tained on the automohile roadway, yet accidents have been much 
rarer than on the carriage sections. Where the slate of wood 
pavement is concerned, the only result of the year's use of the 
automobile section is a change in color from the original brown 
to black, caused by the oil and gases, while the horse drives have 
.sunk irregularly and have become pitted in thousands of places 
over the entire surface, as the result of the pounding of steel 

I Is. To-day the central drive is in far better condition than it 

was at the outset, as it has been compacted and compressed all 
over, while the horse-drives are ready for expensive repairs. 

Leaving this morning at eight o'clock the Automobile Dealers' 
Association of California will hold a reliability run to Del 
Monte. The route will be the most popular one, going from this 
city to San Jose on this side of the bay, and from San Jose to 
Salinas by way of the San Juan grade. There will be two con- 
trols for gasoline and oil at Gilroy and San Juan, but if a car 
stops at Gilroy for oil or gasoline, it must not stop at the control 
in San Juan. Luncheon will be had in Salinas, where gasoline 
may he taken on, if necessary. The run from this city to Salinas 
must be made in live hours and fifteen minutes, with three min- 
utes leeway, before or after, and the second lap from Salinas to 
Del Monte must be made in one hour and twenty-five minutes, 
with the same leeway, finishing at the Del Monte track, where 
each ear will be required to make five miles at a rate of speed 
fifteen miles per hour less than their advertised speed. It is also 
planned to hood a small track meet and short gymkhana pro- 
gramme on Sunday, the cars returning to this city Sunday after- 
noon. An invitation has been extended the owners of motor 
vehicles in the city, and also to the Santa Clara County Auto- 
mobile Club, and from the entries already received, a large num- 
ber will participate. In making the entry, the owner or dealer 
had I" stale the horsepower and seating capacity of the car, and 
must bring an observer, which will be taken from his car and 

an observer supplied him. 

* * * 

The excellent work ihai has been started bv 1,. I'. Lowe, presi- 
dent of thaexecutive committee of the Automohile Club of Cali- 
fornia, in behalf of (he club, has now taken the form of posting 

road signs. The work has I n commenced, and sigD.9 are being 

posted on the roads between Ibis cilv ami Santa Cruz, and San 

Francisco and Del Monte. The posts are being substantially set 
up, and the signs, which are white enamel, with black lettering, 
are plain and effective. A movement has been made to have 
these signs and posts protected bj law. Several counties have 
already signified their willingness to see thai they are pro- 
tected from vandalism and desl ruction. 

* * * 

The recent decision of i he international association of 
nizod automobile clubs, nol to recognijse the American Automo- 
hile Association a- the governing body of the game in America 
was a great victory foi the Automobile Club of America. Al- 
though William K. Vanderbill and A. C. Batchelder endeavored 

io appear before the committee in behalf of the A. A. \ 
were denied admittance, while D. II. Morris, oi the A. C. A.. 
was given a hearing. Although Count Adalbert Siers 



SONOGRAM OILS 

ARE BEING USED BY THE 

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 
AUTOMOBILES and MOTOR LAUNCHES 



Pacific Coast Distributors 



Geo. P. Moore Co. 



721 Golden Gate Ave. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



FRANKLIN 

Automobiles 



The Franklin family touring-car weighs 
1600 pounds. Any other of its power 
weighs 2000. 

The S-passenger Franklin weighs 2200 
pounds; — the average 5-passenger automo- 
bile, a third more. 

The 6-cylinder, 7-passenger Franklin 
weighs 2600 pounds;— the average 6-cylinder 
7-passenger automobile, 4000 pounds. 

An ounce of ability is worth a 
pound of bulk. 

Come and let us prove it. 



Consolidated Motor Car Co. 

S. C. CHAPMAN, Manager 

406 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

Telephone Franklin 3910. 



Los Angeles Branch 
1018 S. Main St. 




H. W. BOGEN 




Automobile Accessories of all kinds. 
AJAX Tires 




460 Golden Gate Ave. 

Phone Franklin 249 

SAN FRANCISCO 



SAN FRANCISCO 



LOS ANGBLBS 



Chanslor S Lyon Motor Supply Co. 



IV URroRATKU! 



Automobile Accessories 
LARGEST AND MOST COM- 
PLETE STOCK ON THE COAST 

Agents (or HARTFORD TIRES 



H. D. McCOT 

Secretary tod Mauser 



542-4-6 GOLDEN GATB AVENIB 

Sas Francuco, CaJ. 



LOCOMOBILES FOR HIRE 

SPECIAL RATES FOR THEATRE AND SHOPPING PARTIES. 

GENERAL MOTOR CAR CO. 



Phon. M.rk.l 1398 



14th and V.l.aci. Sis. 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



June 25, 1908. 



president of the Automobile Club of Germany, set forth that the 
A. A. A. was the more powerful and larger organization, and 
that its control of American racing was legitimate, and that it 
had never been properly notified of the adoption of the Ostend 
rules, which were not observed in making the plans for the Van- 
derbilt Cup contest, the pique felt by the committee at the 
disregard of the rules, caused them, for the present, to decide 
to recognize only the A. C. A. The outcome of this decision will 
be that the races held by the Automobile Club of America in 
Savannah will be entered entirely by foreign cars, American 
manufacturers not wishing to disqualify themselves, and the race 
for the Vanderbilt cup will be participated in by American cars, 
foreign cars not wishing to disqualify themselves with the for- 
eign clubs. This will mean something to the foreign cars who 
will have no way of competing with the speedsters of America, 
who are so rapidly coming forward, and in this way will have no 
way of comparing their speed with the American cars before the 
American public. Should the American-made cars capture a 
few of the world's records, the foreign cars would be placed in 
rather a bad light. That the affiliation of the A. A. A. with the 
Amateur Athletic Union, and through it with the governing bod- 
ies of sports across the water, will embarrass the association of 
recognized automobile clubs in its ill-advised action, however, 
is a certainty, and as a result, a subsequent recession from the de- 
cision may be looked for. 

* * * 

In discussing automobile lubrication with a representative of 
the News Letter several days ago, the manager of the oil de- 
partment for Bass Huetef made a statement that may be of in- 
terest to the automobile owners and drivers. He stated that his 
experience, extending over a long period, had taught him that 
it was not safe to recommend oils for continuous use on auto- 
mobiles unless made from a Paraffine Base Pennsylvania Crude, 
as they are free from sulphur and acid. This oil will produce 
better results, be found freer from carbon, and will not pit the 
cylinders as oil refined from an asphaltum base, crude, or, in 
other words, an oil that must be treated with acid in order to 
produce the proper gravity and color. 

Whenever you see smoke coming out of the exhaust pipe you 



Bosch Magnetos and Parks 

Our Repairing Guaranteed 



PACIFIC AUTOMOBILE EXCHANGE 
465 Golden Gate Ave. 



San Francisco 



We Want Your Automobile Repair and Machine Work 

The Irvin Machine Works 



335-337 Golden Gate Avenue Phone Market 2366 

San Francisco 



IRVIN SILVERBER.G, 

President, and Manager 



know that it is going over the top of the cylinders, and is bound 
to produce carbon. After the engine has been tested and re- 
assembled, three pints of oil put in the base of the engine will, 
if the bearings are perfectly tight, run the car for several thou- 
sand miles, and if you want to take the oil out to strain or renew 
it, this can be easily done by way of the two pet-cocks at the 
base. You can draw out the amount and measure it, which will 
show just what has been used out of the three pints, and then 
you can put back three pints in the base. 

The great trouble is, that most operators feed oil into the base 
from the oiler indiscriminately. They think the more oil they 
can run in the better it will be. 

* * * 

A peculiar incident of the second day of the Glidden tour was 
the congregation of Great Arrow cars nearing Sewiekley, as six 
cars entered by the George N. Pierce Co. came in one after an- 
other. Pew of the inhabitants had seen any other car on the 
road. The chairman of the touring board, Prank B. Hower and 
Charles J. Glidden, original donor of the trophy, were in a 
Great Arrow as pace makers, and an immediate halt called while 
the leaders waited for the others to catch up. The schedule of 
six hours and thirty minutes had already been beaten by all 



Made for the Man Who Wants the Best 



THE 

SPLITDORF 

High Tension 
Magneto 

With this Magneto on your car you can forget all about 
ignition apparatus— so perfectly and so efficiently does it 
spark your engine. Generates its own current — requires 
no battery, and literally makes the motor run like velvet. 

If you want the best magneto, equip your car with a 
SPLITDORF. 

Write or call for our 1908 catalogue which fully describes this type of magneto. 




520 Van Ness Ave 



Pacific Coast* Branch 

C F. SPLITDORF 



San Francisco 



Junk 2. r ., 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



23 



of tlir Great Arrow team, and all could have reached the 
destination in five hours. The hall brought up ahoul eighteen 
other cars, and the procession through Pittsburg, headed bj Mr. 
Poster and Milton Lusk, in his Gabriel Horn car, with livelj 
music, was made in good order, and at legal speed. The streets 
were open to the tourists who, as last year, passed through at a 
great speed, cheered on by the police and citizens. 

Is John D. Rockefeller to become a tourist? For several years 

lie has owned an automobile, and, whether he is staying ai Cleve- 
land, at Tarrytown or at Augusta, lie takes a daily outing in his 
White limousine. A lew days ago he bought another White, the 
third ear el' that make which he has acquired. His two former 
purchases, however, were limousines, while the new machine is 
a touring ear, the first that Mr. Rockefeller has owned. 

* * * 

Mr. Sam L. Naphtaly, the well known engineer, lias purchased 
from R. J. Marx, manager of Renault Preres selling branch, a 
35-45 h. ]i. touring runabout. This ear is conceded lo lie the 
fastest roadster in the State. The San Francisco branch lias now 
en route the following Renault ears: Two roadsters, two touring 
cars, and one limousine. 

Walter C. Morris, Western Distributor for the Autocar <''>., is 
now located in new quarters al CIO Van Ness avenue. The fol- 
lowing sales are reported during the week: Mr. A. (!. It. Cooper, 
typo XV runabout; Mr. Roy Thorpe, Pescadero, type XIV road- 
ster; Mr. It. Van Tiger, of Chico, type XV runabout; ami 
Roger Cutler, Tonopah, type XIV louring ear. 

* * * 

Dr. J. U. Snout, local agent of the Stearns, has jusl returned 
from a tour of the Yoseniite with a parly of friends. 

* * * 

P. L. Du Broy, Pacific ('nasi representative of the olds Motor 
Works, arrived in the city this morning from Oregon ami Wash- 
ington, where he has been for several months. Mr. tin Broy re- 
ports that business is \m good in the Northwest, and he lias 
placed something like a hundred cars there. 




The "Show Me" Car 



Has Shown You 



Perfect Scores 

For both our entries in the 
twenty-four-hour endurance run 



RUNABOUT 
AND TOURING CAR 



OSEN & HUNTER 

407 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 



SIX CARLOADS JUST ARRIVED 

FORD 

4-Cylinder, 15 Horsepower Model S Roadsters 
$750.00 




A Touring Car for three. High-price quality in low-price c«\ 
The car that, lasts longest, and coses least, while it. lasts. 
MODEL S ROADSTER. $ 750 

MODEL S RUNABOUT TOO 

MODEL N RUNABOUT 600 

MODEL K RUNABOUT 2.8O0 

MODEL K TOURING CAR 3.O0O 

The above prices ire f.o. b. Detroit 



AN 




ACM 


£ 


DEMONSTRATING 




CAR 




AT A 




BARGAIN 





Standard Motor Car Co. 



503 Golden Gate 
Avenue 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



June 2.5, 1 mis. 



STRANG TELLS OF RAGE. 

His Trouble on Course — Praises the Thomas Oar. 

(Special by French Cable to the Tribune. Copyright, 1908 by 

the Tribune . Issot iation. ) 

Dieppe, July 7. — Louis Strang, who intends to return to 
New York .m the Deutchland, which sails on Friday from 
Cherbourg, lias jusl come into Dieppe on his Thomas car. 
His eyes are inflamed, owing to the coal-tar dust. He relates to 
the Tribune the following description of his experience in to- 
day's rati' : 

By Louis Steamg. 

"I found all the arrangements for the stands here very much 
better than on the American circuits. All the spectators here 
could sit the race, and also llir work dono mi all tin- cars at the 
repair and supply stations in front of the grand-stand. The mili- 
tary patroling of the circuit was perfect. The only bad Eeature 
was the dressing put on the road to lay the dust, which hard- 
ened on the surface like a crust of tar. This was badly broken 
up yesterday by the Voiturette racers, and to-day if pulverized, 
making it very dangerous, and sometimes it completely Minded 
the drivers. 1 had to stop three times tn have my eyes treated 
by surgeons on my Bret lap. 

"While taking a corner in a cloud of 'Inst, after another ear, I 
hit a stone curbing, which blew up my left-hand rear lire, and in 
skidding, the car hit a piece el' heard from a fence, which so in- 
jured the gasoline tank that it subsequently leaked so badly as 

to put (is nut of the race. We changed tires on every la]) in 
front of (he grandstand, where we also tried to repair the gaso- 
line tank. 

"Finally ai Londinieres we withdrew from the race. When 
coming in to Oriel, one of the cars had hit a tree, and Ihrcc or 
four cars had been stopped by the guards because the tree had 
fallen across the road. They were jusl starting again when t 

came through the dust and found three cars blocking (lie road. 

In order in escape hitting the ttala car, driven by Henri Four- 
aier, I was obliged to drive on the grass and hit a small tree 

which injured by left rear wheel and exploded thi' (ire. 

"The car which I drove is strictly a stock car, all parts of 

which are interchangeable with any 60 horse-power Thomas car. 

II ar was not specially built for racing, and it behaved won- 
derfully well for a machine of the touring type. 

* * * 

With seventy-two cars in the Glidden tour last year, the value 

of extra tires used is figured in have I a $6,175. The record 

was kept by the Diamond Rubber Company, whose figures -lowed 
that :;:; ears having Diamond tires used 14 extra (ires all told, 
and 39 cars having ether makes el' tires used SI extra tires all 
told. As there is no direct penalty for lire trouble in the (Hidden 
lour, the Diamond Company is again, this rear, keeping tab en 
the Dumber of extra tires required by till (he cars as a means of 

showing tire results en a hasis of mileage cost. The figures 
■■■■ ing the record of lasl year are made up with $65 as the 
average \ die of the (ires of different sizes in use. The total of 

$6,175 for last year, it should he undersl 1. indicates the value 

of new (ire- put on during Ihi' tain, nol actual (ire expense, for 

tin' reason thai a great many of the tires discarded were capable 

of being repaired. 

* * * 

Word has been received Er Harry E. Peltz, of Klamath 

Kails. Oregon, thai he has arrived there safely in his Thomas 
. having driven if from this city. It is hi- intention to 
make immediate arrangements for a regular stage line hetwecn 
Klamath Falls and Crater Lake. Mr. Peltz i- interested in tim- 
ber lands in Oregon, and is a firm believer in going at things 
right. His Flyer will cut down the horse stage lime hy three- 
quarter-, besides providing a mode of locomotion far more com- 
fortable than the old four-in-hand. This is the lirsl automobile 
he has ever owned, yet he discharged his chauffeur at Redding, 
and piloted the big red car without mishap to Klamath Falls. 
Mr. Peltz reports (he toad from Lamoine to the Falls in good 
shape. ,j;4| 



IGNITION ar >d at less expense and inconven- 
TRdllRI F^ ie nce to you than at present. Rent 
iriUUDLCd your batteries from AUT0 ignition CO. 

AVOIDED 709-711 Octavia St., Phone Market 5678. 







. 




S§b' 




Stevens-Duryea Limousines 

can 'be used throughout the entire season. Windows let 
in air and keep out rain and dust when necessary. 

*I A ride in a Stevens-Duryea Limousine is a tonic 
for the invalid — gives him the reviving and refreshing air 
of out-doors, yet thoroughly protects the physically weak 
from wind and weather. '■. 

ffl Stevens-Duryea Limousines and Touring Cars 

are most heartily endorsed by those who have purchased 

them. 

ffl Arrange for a demonstration. 

PACIFIC MOTOR. CAR COMPANY 

376-380 Golden Gate Ave. 
Oakland Branch: 1308-10 Franklin Street. 

Manufactured b} Stevena-Duryea Company. Cticopee Falls, Mass.. 1. S. A. 




WRAPPED TREAD 

TIRES 



What stronger proof could there be of Ajax Material 
and Workmanship? 

Write for copy of guarantee stating what size tire you are using. 
Address Dept. W 

AJAX-GRIEB ROBBER COMPANY 

GBNERAL OFFICES: 

Y E. Gor. 57th St. and Broadway, New York City. 
Factories. Trenton, N. J. 

BRANCHES: 

New York, 1776 Broadway, Denver, 1529 Cleveland Place 

Boston. 8iq-A Boylston St. Seattle, iroa Broadway 

Chicago, 1418 Michigan Ave. San Francisco, 460 Golden Gate Ave 

Detroit, 743 Woodward Ave. Los Angeles, 1040 S. Main St' 

AGENTS !N ALL LARGE CITIES 



Junk 25, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISKi:. 



25 



America's Champion Still in Lead, but Delayed Five Days. 

Report from Viatka, Russia, July 15th, shows that the Thomas 
Fiver in the Now York to Paris race, has now been held over 
live days waiting for the new gear which is to replace the one 
broken in the swamps of Siberia, The geaT has been lost by 
the Trans-Siberian Railroad, and Schuster is vainly traveling 
back over the road to find it. The old gear had been tempor- 
arily repaired thirty miles from Obansk, and could stand the ter- 
rible strain of the rough, rain-soaked roads no longer. The 
ear reached Ekaterinburg on Monday of last week, and left 
Tuesday. At eight o'clock it passed a monument on the road 
which marked the dividing line between Siberia and Russia, 
and the crew realized they were at last in Europe. 

The car reached Perm on Wednesday in a steady, dismal rain. 
The roads were soaked and flooded, worse than ever. Miller 
advised waiting until the rain ceased, arguing that the crudely 
repaired gear could not stand the ruts and holes that racked the 
ear so fearfully. Schuster would "stop for nothing," but this 
time his progressive spirit proved fatal, for it was here, in all the 
rain, mud and clay, that the ' old gear gave way. Even after 
this serious mishap, the car continued fifteen miles to Viatka, 
but this last stretch put the gear completely out of business, and 
the ear is still held up, awaiting the new part. No report has 
been received from the Protos. It has not yet reached Viatka 
or passed the Thomas, and some fear is expressed that it may be 
lost or broken down in the wilds of Siberia. 

* * * 

A Packard three-ton truck recently carried a 4,500 pound 
load from South Orange, N. J., to Islip, L. I., a distance of 
G4.S miles. The running time was 6 hours and 15 minutes. The 
truck was used because it would have been impossible to have 
shipped the furniture and a pony from South Orange to Islip 
by any other means in less than two days. The demonstration 
was watched closely by New Yorkers, and was such a success- 
ful illustration of the possibilities of interurban hauling by 
motor vehicles that it likely will be followed by many other long 
hauls of a similar nature. 

* * * 

R. YV. and 0. C. Saakes of Los Angeles, arrived here on Wed- 
nesday of last week, having driven their Franklin machine from 
the Southern city, coming up the coast route. After remaining 
here for a few days, they will return via Fresno and Bakersfield. 

* * * 

J. M. Woodruff, accompanied by Mrs. Woodruff) arrived in 
San Francisco Saturday, having driven their Franklin machine 
from Portland, Ore. They came down in easy stages, spending 
Bometime in the mountains. Thej will remain in San Francisco 
for several weeks. 

* * * 

Bert Dingley, who is well known to almost every one for his 
Easi driving and winning of tnanj races, purchased a Pope-Hart- 
ford louring ear Lasl week from the Consolidated Motor Oar Co. 
Dingley new makes his home in Modesto, where he conducts an 
automobile garage. 



* * » 
lake the ! Trip. 



Watson and Pi ase to 

Arthur 1!. Watson, chairman of the tours and runs committee 
id' the Automobile Club of California, and R. II. Pease, .'r.. his 

brother-in-law, and himself e well-known m ist, left M 

Jul] 30th, in their Franklin touring car on an interesting hunt- 
ing and fishing trip that will net end until Portland is reached. 
Their route will be through Mendocino and Humboldt counties, 
which contain seme of the most magnificent scenery on the 
I'll, i Si i loasl i iem e i ■■■ ill go on throug at Citv 

and Grants' Pass to Portland. The trip me of pleas- 

ure, and Watson and Pease will step to tish or hunt wherever 

the prospect appears enticing. 

' * * * 

Ik ■ policy issued by the Insurance Company of North A 
i< attracting a great deal of attention from the owners of auto- 
mobiles in this city. It covers all S i the Union and 
Canada, and may be extended to cover foreign countries. I 
protects the insured against all loss or actual damage and expense 
incurred in preserving the automobile, and pn urther 
daman covering the loss or damage by tire i 
It places no restriction on the use or storage of . and 
Includes the risk of fire originating in the machine. The policy 

id and liberal, and because of this, has attra. 
deal of attention. 



Phone Frank i i 

Up-To-Datc Autos 
for hire at all hours 




MAX MAMLOGK 



370 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



VULCANIZING 

Davis Bros. 

INCORPORATED 

TIRES RETREADED AND MADE NEW 
Phone Park 710 979 Golden Gate Ave 



V ULC ANIZIN G 

Stevens & Elkington. Rubber Co. 

Phone Franklin 612 

524 Polk St. near Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco, Cal. 



Reliance Automobile Co. 

GARAGE, LIVERY AND MACHINE SHOP 



PHONES: 



Park 324 
Park 325 



Fulton and Octavia 




Tfiomas B. Jertery 8 Company, 117-125 Valencia St., San Francisco 



Garage Phone, Market 3337 
(Day) 



Stand Phone, West 7145 
Thompson's Cafe (Night.) 



Thomas Flyers 

FOR HIRE AT ALL HOURS. 
THE ONLY 6-CYLINDER THOMAS. 



Rapid Garage, 1841 Market St. 



J. E. Neumann, Manager. 



TIPS TO AUTOMOBILISTS 



PALO ALTO — Stanford Auto and Manufacturing Co., renting repairing 
and sundries. Fire-proof garag 148-9 Emerson 

street. Tel. Main 7- department, nil Alma street. 

SAN JOSE — Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North First street The best French 
Jinner In California, 75c. or a la carte. Automobile parties given par- 
ticular attention. 

SAN JOSE— WALLACE BROS". GARAGE. Market and St. James 
streets. 20,000 square feet of floor space. Special accommodations for 
ladies. Repairing, sundries, renting. Fire proof garage. Day and night 

service. 

SAN JOSE — Stop at LETCHER'S New Garage for flrst-class service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlor for ladies In connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garage next to corner of First and St James Sts. 

GILROT, CAL. — George E. Tice. general machinist, expert repairing of 
automobiles and engines a specialty. Day or night service, 260 N Mon- 
terey street. 

PETALCMA. — McNear Garage and Machine Works. Any kind of auto 
repairing. Full line of auto supplies; complete machine shop. Corner 
Third and C streets. 



KEEN.AN BROS. 

Automobile Engineers, Machinists and Blacksmiths. 
;:j Valenda Street, San Francisco. Telephone Market 1985 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



June 85, 1908. 



What promises to be the greatest and most pleasurable auto- 
mobile run ever held under the auspices of any single manufac- 
turer will be that described by Mr. Hazlitt L. Pelton, manager 
of the Auto Vehicle Company, to be participated in by the 
owners of Tourist earSj who will make the run from Los An- 
geles to San Francisco and return. 

The start will be made from Los Angeles, August 12th, and 
all owners of Tourist cars are most cordially invited to join the 
party, for whose pleasure and convenience the Auto Vehicle 
Company is sparing neither effort nor expense. 

The route will include Rakersfield as the first stopping place, 
where, on the night of the twelfth, a banquet will be tendered 
the members of the party. At Tulare, on the following day. 
they will be the guests of the city at a luncheon to be spread 
under the trees of the park. 

Fresno, Modesto, Stockton and Oakland will be visited, and 
two days will be passed in San Francisco before the return run 
is negotiated. 

Leaving San Francisco, the party will reach San Jose in time 
for lunch. The local agency of the Auto Vehicle Company at 
San .lose will endeavor to arrange a hill-climbing contest, 
either mi the Alum Uncle grade or Mt. Hamilton. If a sufficient 
number of entries are made, a prize cup will be offered for the 
winner of this contest. Those who take part in this event will 
leave San Francisco one day in advance of the main party, with 
whom they will continue the run, either by way of Gilroy or 
Santa Cruz, according as the will of the majority decides in 
favor of crossing the mountains or otherwise. 

At Del Monte, the party will be most agreeably entertained. 
Mr. Warner, manager of the Hotel Del Monte, has offered 
several fine cups as trophies for different events. Chief among 
them will be a cup for an endurance run from San Francisco 
to the hotel, the conditions of which will be published later. 
There will be other cups for track events. 

The party will then proceed to Paso Hobles, via Pizmo, and 
thence by way of Santa Barbara to Los Angeles. It is expected 
that the entire run will occupy about ten days, and that not 
less than seventy-five cars will participate. 

For the convenience of its guests, the Auto Vehicle Company 
will provide a car supplied with all necessary parts in ample 
quantity, and accompanied by a corps of skilled machinists. A 
tire supply car will also be in attendance. 

The Auto Vehicle Company will issue a booklet which will 
contain the stops to be made, together with a list of the best 
hotels and the Bpecial rates which have been secured for the 
party, the location of supply stations and a general itinerary of 
the trip. There will also be inserted a number of blank pages 
for a personal log of the individual participants. The fact that 
this run has received the endorsement of so well-known a man 
as Mr. J. S. Conwell, the general manager of the Auto Vehicle 
Company, who is most enthusiastic in forwarding arrangements, 
is sufficient guarantee that the occasion will be an unqualified 
.success, and it is to be hoped that no Tourist owner who can 
possibly join the party will fail to do so. 

* * * 
Walter K. Heyneman, accompanied by Alfred L. Weil, motored 
to Del Monte last Saturday in his Pope-Hartford machine. 



miles is what, a prominent, business man traveled with his car 
equipped with the 

Sffl{^3(gm(gimftsiiry Spiral Springs 




He further states that they have 
given him no trouble and have 
saved the Tires, the car in general 
and improved the riding 100 per 
cent.. 

We will place a set. on your ma- 
chine and if they do not do all 
that, we claim for them, we will 
refund you the money. 



Frank O. Renstrom Company 



424-446 Stanyan St., San Francisco. 



Phone Park 476 




[Made in York] 

"Not only the best, for the price but. the best. at. any price 

Ask the man who owns one." 

Model H Touring Ccr $2050.00 

6-30 Roadster 2900.00 

4-40 Roadster 3150.00 

Model I Touring Car 3400.00 

Immediate delivery San Francisco at. the above prices. 

Repairing in all Branches, Painting and Supplies. Agents 

Supplementary Spiral Springs 

FRANK O. RENSTROM CO. 

424-446 Stanyan St.. Phone Park 476 



\\ illiam H. Hansen, of Redwood City, and Charles A. Barker, 
of San Francisco, motored to Del Monte last week for a couple of 
days' stay. 



AUTOMOBILE AND CARRIAGE 
PAINTING, .VARNISHING AND 
TRIMMING. Tops and Seat 
Covers made to order. 

LOCOMOBILE REPAIRING. 
Complete line of Locomobile 
parts. Estimates Given on 
all work. 



The Greenland Co., Inc. 

J. MURRAY PAGE, Mgr. 
Phone Market. 1398 28? Valencia St.. 



Installation of Magnetos a specialty. 

GEO. H. WOODWARD 

Automobile Machinist. 



PACIFIC 

GOAST 

AGENTS FOR 

THE 

LITTLE 

STEERSMAN 




Fine Repairing 
Machine Work 

44448 FULTON 

St., San Francisco 



TLLKHIONL MARKET 1683 



■Washington and East Sts. 



Pbone Kearny 678 



Ferry Garage Co. 

cAll Workmanship Guaranteed 

Storage. Renting Supplies. Machinist 



June 85. 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



27 



Max L. Rosenfcld. president of the Automobile Dealers' Asso- 
ciation, was ni Del Monte for a few days last week, arranging 
lor the endurance run of automobiles to that place on July 25th. 
Accompanying Mr. Rosenfeld were A. L. Holt and Pierre 0. 
Moore, both of San Francisco. 

* * * 

L. 8. White and his brother, it. White, who are among the 
largest orange producers in Central California, having a large 
orchard at. Lindsay, are at Del Monte for a stay of a couple of 
months. They have their automobile with them, and divide 
their time between driving about the country and playing golf. 

The Splitdorf Laboratory has issued a very comprehensive 
booklet of the Splitdorf Ignition Automobile and Gas Engine 
Apparatus. It is illustrated with fine half-tones and diagrams 
showing the Splitdorf specialties. The one, two, three and four 
cylinder dash coils are described, the distributing Synchronized 
Multi-Cylinder Coil has a chapter. The vibrators are given 
space, and the magnetos of the "high tension" type is described 
at length, as is also the motor-cvele magneto and the Splitdorf 
low tension magneto, a compact and neat instrument. Plugs, 
cut-out switches and aii of the accessories of ignition are found 
in this booklet. The local agency under the management of Mr. 
('. F. Splitdorf operates a splendidly equipped maintenance de- 
partment, where they are prepared to remedy all coil and mag- 
neto defects. The address is 520 Van Ness avenue. 

* * * 

Mrs. Joan Cuneo, the only woman driving a car in the Glid- 
ili'ii contest, had hei amateur standing well emphasized by the 
fact that she had great trouble in getting an observer. Mrs. 
Cuneo drives a 50 h. p. Rainier car, but the manufacturer does 
not participate in her effort in any way, not even to the extent 
of furnishing an observer, and even declined to do so. She fin- 
ally named a New York newspaper reporter, who will, of course, 
ride in other cars. Mrs. Cuneo has a woman companion and a 
mechanic with her, but no one touches the wheel but herself, 
and the little woman steers the big ear as easily and gracefully 
as a girl handles the tiller ropes of a row boat on a lake. 



THE PEER OF ALL! 

PLANET OIL COMPANY'S 

TRANSIT AUTOMOBILE OILS 

BASS-HUETER CO. 
816 Mission Street Distributors 

ADAPTED 'TO EVERY MACHINE 

Friction Costs more than Lubrication 



A striking example of the way America overtakes European 
industries and then outspeeds them, is found in a recent an- 
nouncement concerning the biggest corporation in the automobile 
industry, the American Locomotive Company. After having for 
three years, in its factory here, duplicated a French ear, it will 
now drop the French name and let its product have the full 
prestige of the great Locomotive Company's name and resources. 
Henceforth, it is understood, the Locomotive car will be prac- 
tically a French car, Americanized in special details, conform- 
ably to American conditions. On the whole, the automobile in- 
dustry is- repeating bicycle history. At first, the English bicycles 
were the best to be had, here and everywhere, but the American? 
copied, then improved, and now American bicycles are sold 
all over the world. 

* * * 

Mr. "W. W. Charles of Tonopah and E. G. Wheeler of San 
Francisco were among those who motored to Del Monte last 
week. 



Auto Eye? You Know How Eyes Suffer after Exposure 

in Sun, Wind and Dust. Neglect results in Eye-Strain, Red- 
ness and Granulation. Be Wise in time. .Murine Soothes and. 
Quickly Relieves. 



GLIDDEN TOUR 



TIRE COST 



1907 

The Figures Showed When the Tour Was Over, and Our Announcement Read 

THE COST PER CAR 

FOR TIRES IN 

The Glidden Tour 

STRIKINCLY ILLUSTRATES 

Diamond 

Wrapped Tread Supremacy 

Talcs S5S .is an average price for used tires of different sizes— 

S3 cars with Diamond tires used 14 extras, value, at *<.J— J910. 

Average Per C»r, $27.57 

38 cars with other makes used si extra tires, value, at 

Average Per Car, $135 



1908 



THE COST PER CAR 



WATCH 



IS of the H actual entries use Diamond tires.. Five other makes 
divide the remaining 1«. Of the nun^ontesting cars more than one- 
third have Diamond equipment. 



THE DIAMOND RUBBER CO. 

Mission and 2nd Sts., San Francisco. Factories, Akron, Ohio. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEE 



Jdnb 25, 1908. 



Arrofia tljp Sable 

l:v WALTBB ADOLPH ROBERTS IV (JULY) OVERLAND MONTHLY. 




HAD BEEN prospect- 
ing for man}' years 
and was accustomed 
to strange surround- 
ings, but it seemed 
that I had never be- 
fore struck any spot 
so desolate as that 
adobe hut in the mountains of Sonora. 

. We had ridden out from Xogales early 
that morning. Bennett, my partner, was 
an old-timer in Mexico, and I had 
allowed him to lead the way. I knew very 
little of the man, for we had met by 
chance in the Montezuma Hotel the night 
of my arrival in Nogales. But, he was 
a miner, every inch of him. It did not 
take me long to find that out, and as I 
needed a partner I had grub-staked him. 
He was an unusually silent man, and 
had given me no explanation of the route 
beyond the statement that he knew what 
he was about. Half a mile from town, 
we had struck out from the road, and 
plunged into the rough country between 
Nogales and Cananea. The morning's 
tramp had been a weary one, the rest at 
mid-day only too short, and now, after 
a straggle with the burros all the after- 
noon, Bennett had called a halt at the 
door of the wretched little hut that 
seemed to depend upon the bare brown hill 
behind it to save it from tumbling to the 
ground. 

"This will give us shelter for a week or 
two anyway," said Bennett, shortly. 

"The country does not look promising," 
I grumbled. 

"I know it to be plumb full of gold." 
asserted my partner, and as 1 was depend- 
ing on his judgment this trip, I acqui- 

We tethered the burros and prepared 
the evening meal in silence. Then we en- 
tered the hut, unpacked our blankets and 
made our beds side by side upon the 



ground. In one corner was a patch of 
earth baked hard, and above it a hole in 
the roof. Observing this provision for a 
fire, I gathered some dry mesquite and 
soon had a small blaze going. As the light 
flickered up, I had my first clear view of 
the interior of the hut. It was bare ex- 
cept for a deal table that stood near the 
center and two blocks of- wood, one on 
either side of the table, which had evi- 
dently been intended to serve as seats. 

Surprised at finding even this furniture, 
I crossed over, sat on one of the blocks 
and leaned with my elbows on the table. 

"It is going to be cold to-night," I said, 
yawning, and even before I had finished 
speaking, I raised my eyes to find that 
Bennett was seated opposite to me. 

"It was just like this that Billy Hall, 
the Kentuckian, and Shorty Cummins sat 
three years ago," said by silent partner, 
and I noticed that his eyes gleamed un- 
naturally. "And now, do you wonder why 
] brought you here? I quit after it all 
happened; you or any other man .would 
have quit : but they knew where the gold 
was, thev did !" 

"Who were they?" I asked testily. The 
man's nervous stare affected me in some 
unaccountable way, and I did not sec 
what connection his remarks had with our 
adventure. A moment later I was star- 
;ng bark hard into his eyes, and my flesh 
tingled as he told me what follows: 

"It was back in 190— that I first 
came here. T built the hut, for I felt 
suit of the country, and a tent is unsub- 
stantial if one expects to be settled for a 
year or more. I hoped to strike a placer 
claim. There's no reason why there should 
not be one, for you know that's what 
made Magdalena. sixty miles from here. 
I worked day and night, you may say. Eor 
I was determined to make a stake that 
would last me for the rest of my life. 
I was sick of prospecting. It had only 



brought me hardship in the past, but 1 
knew 1 was good for nothing else, and if 
1 was ever to settle down and have a home 
of my own, the dirt would have to do it. 

"I worked for three months withmit 
striking anything. But I would not give 
up, for the country looked good to me, 
and besides that I had a queer feeling that 
I could not shake off that there was gold 
here. 

"At last, one November morning, as I 
put the pick over my shoulder and stepped 
outside. [ saw two men with burros going 
down the canyon. They were prospectors, 
and I went white with rage at seeing them. 
I knew I was too near to Nogales to hope 
that other prospectors would not come 
along, but in spite of that I was mad. mad 
clear through. 

"They may have seen the hut before I 
came outside, but they did not look back, 
and after a while they disappeared down 
the trail. 

"They might be going to Magdalena. I 
thought, and it looked that way, for I did 
not see them again that day, nor the next, 
nor the next. 

"The fourth day I was out pretty late. 
I had forgotten, the men, and as I swung 
up the trail I was thinking of something 
rery different, dreaming perhaps of the 
future. They did not occur to my mind 
even when I saw that there was a light 
in my hut. The Yaqui Indians had been 
troublesome for weeks past, and it was 
the fear of them that made me steal as 
softly as a mountain lion towards the 
door. If Yaquis had taken possession I 
would have to quit, that was all, but I 
wanted to be sure about it. 

"If you will look at the door you will 
see that it is round the corner like, and 
unless a man inside is staring straight 
at it he would not see a fellow who was 
squinting in with half an eye. 

"So I felt pretty safe in crawling up on 



FIRE MARINE AUTOMOBILE 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 



CAPITAL, $1,600,000 



ASSETS, $6,000,000 



CALIFORNIA AND SANSOME STREETS 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Cash Capital, $£00,000. 



Cash A»e<!t«, J6S1.377.19 



Pacific Coast Gasualty Co. 

OF CALIFORNIA. 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, Elevators, Workmen's 
Collective. "Vessels, Burglary. Plate Glass Insurance. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; John C. Coleman. Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; F. P. Deerlng, 
Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel. H. E. Bothln, Edward L. Brayion, John C. Cole- 
man, F. P. Deering, E. F. Green, James K. Moffltt, Henry Rosenfeld, 
Adolph A. Son, William S. Tevls. 

Head Office — Merchants Exchange Building, San Francisco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company, General Agents for California, Kohl Building, San 
Francisco. 



The Connecticut Fire Insurance Co. 

Of Hartford. Established 1810. 

Capital $1,000,000.0(1 

Total Assets 6,721,413.01 

Surplus to Policyholders 2,282.18«.00 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL BUILDING 
BENJAMIN J. SMITH, MANAGER. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co., Ltd. 

Of Liverpool. 
Capital $3,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agar*! 

jao SANSOME STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



The Home Insurance Co., 



New York 



Organized 1853. Cash Capital, $3,000,000 

Insurance on Personal effects of tourists and temporary sojourners 

anywhere in United States, Canada and Mexico. Insurance against loss 

by fire, lightning, wind storm or tornado. Indemnity for Iobs of rental 

Income by fire or lightning. 

H. L. ROFF, General Agent. J. J. SHEAHAN, AsB't General Agent. 
S8 Sutter St., San Francisco. Cal. 



Junk 25, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



29 



m v belly and taking a look al whal was 

going on inside. 

"At the first glance I almost jumped 
to my feet and went in to ask my visitors 
their business. 

"It was not Yaqnis in there, but the 
two prospectors T had seen four days be- 
fore. 

"But, as you know, I am a man who 
acts slowly. As I looked again, some- 
thing seemed to hold me back. The men 
were silent. There was nothing strange 
about that, but they were sitting just as 
you and I are sitting now, and staring at 
each other across the table. 

"It seemed years before either of them 
spoke, and when at last the words came, 
they hit me hard. 

" 'It was a rich strike, partner. We are 
in luck at last,' said the taller of the two 
men deliberately. 

"His accent was tell-tale. I knew him 
for a Southerner at once, but it was not 
that fact which interested me. It was just 
two words of what he had said: 'Rich 
strike ! Rich strike !' Good God ! Hadn't I 
been toiling my heart out for that for 
weary months, and they had found it in 
four days. 

"I waited breathlessly for the other 
man's answer. 

" 'Yes, it's rich,' he said jerkily, 'and 
placer, too. But it may not turn out any 
too good for us. We are near Nogales. 
They will get wise and stake out claims all 
round us as soon as we go to work.' 

" 'What else do you expect, Shorty ? 
Doesn't that happen every time? We can 
each get a claim that ought to make us 
rich.' 

" 'Oh, you're a tenderfoot ! What do 
you know about it?'" sneered the other, 
whom in a flash I remembered as Shorty 
Cummins, of old Nevada days. 'We are 
in a prospector's camp right now. He'll 
know soon enough and spoil the game for 
us. I seen him five miles away this after- 
noon. But he'll be back to-morrow sure, 
and the gold is so near, he'll know when 
we go to work and queer us. Maybe he'll 
call it bis claim. I seen where he's been 
at work all round it.' 

" ^Ve can fix him.' said the Southerner 
slowly, and the menace in his tone was 
so unmistakable that my band went to 
my gun. 

"'Fix him — yes.' Shorty Cummins 
jumped to his feet and lashed out blindly 
with both arms. 'Bui what do I know 
about you, Billy Hall? What do I know 
about you? It's only two weeks -m e we 
met. an, I you're so damned strange that 
ri know any more about you now 
than 1 did then. It will be hard for two 
of us to work this mine on the quiet and 
Bet away with enough to make it worth 



our while. But I've heerd tell of men, I 
have, who'd give away a secret like this, 
sell it for cash down and let a partner go 
to hell. I ain't stood bad luck for nearly 
naif a life-time to run the chance of being 
fooled now.' 

"The man was incoherent and he knew 
it, for he stopped suddenly. 

" 'Shorty,' said the Southerner quietly, 
'it's hard to heaj- that from a man I've 
packed blankets with, even though it's 
only been for two weeks. You're dead 
wrong if you think I'd go back on a 
partner, but now you've spoken, we might 
as well have this out.' 

"He motioned Shorty to resume his seat 
— and as the latter did so, the smooth, 
low-pitched voice went on. If I live to be 
a hundred I'll never forget what he said. 
It's burned in to my brain like the first 
brand on the skin of a yearling calf. 

"'AVe were drunk with good luck this 
morning, but that's worn off, and we are 
selfish once more. I am no better than 
you. The trouble with both of us is, that 
we want it all. Why shouldn't we? 
Chance threw us together, but that could 
not make us friends. It's not outsiders 
you're afraid of. It's me. Good God ! 
what devils gold makes of us ! Luck never 
came to us before, and we can't stand it. 

"His shoulders humped convulsively, 
and he half fell across the table. 

" 'It's home I'm thinking of, the home 
in Kentucky I left ten years ago. I want 
to take back enough to pay me for this 
living death in Mexico. But we'll play 
fair, Shorty. Don't let the one who lives 
feel that he struck the other man from 
behind.' 

"As he spoke, his hand went to his 
belt, and the next moment his gun, a 
Colt's, lay on the table. 

"Cummins was staring hard. His lips 
set in a fixed grin, hut his hands 
I witched. 

" 'Acrost the table !' he muttered. 'We'd 
both die that way !' 

" 'Not if we leave one gun unloaded." 

" 'Mine's got no shells in it,' said 
Shorty, thickly, and he laid a Smith & 
Wesson beside the niher revolver. 

"Billy Hall picked it up and revolved it 
r three times. I afterwards remem- 
bered that he Beemed to handle it clumsily. 
Perhaps, like most miners, he was accus- 
' to a Coir's, for he did not break it. 
Presently he nod, led and put it down. 

" 'Mine's a full house,' he said, 'and 
now we'll spin a coin three times for the 
choii 

"The face of Shorty Cummins was 
ashen white. TT ; s hand went to his throat. 
The mechanical calm of the other seemed 
terrible in comparison. 



" 'lb 1 ids are mine, tails yours,' said 
Hall, as he spuu a dime he had taken from 
his pocket. It tinkled for a few seconds 
and then lay still. 

" 'Tails,' said Hall. 'Now you try.' 

"Cummins took the dime and spun it 
with trembling hand. 

"'Heads!' he almost shrieked. 

"For the third time (he coin flew up- 
ward. It fell on the table and tinkled 
away into silence. The two men were 
crouched low over the table and at first 
they did not seem to realize what had 
happened. 

"Then Bill Hall leaned back. 'Choose 
your gun,' he said, and I knew who would 
he the murderer. 

"I felt like letting out a scream of hor- 
ror and rushing in between those two mad- 
men. But what would have been the use ? 
They would have killed me like a dog and 
gone on with their game. For when a man 
is drunk with gold he is more savage than 
a million redskins. 

"Cummins was calmer now. The fear 
of death that had passed over him had left 
him limp, almost nerveless. Reaching 
over he picked up Bill Hall's gun and 
leveled it. 

"The other stared down into the barrel 
and did not flinch. I seemed to be living 
through centuries as I waited for the re- 
port, but still it did not come. 

"Cummins was shaking again, and 
presently he swung the revolver away 
from the bee-line he had drawn on Billy 
Hall's forehead.' 

" T can't do it. It's murder,' he said 
brokenly. 

"'Shall I shoot myself?' sneered Hall. 
He was game through and through. But. 
suddenly a wave of understanding passed 
over his face. 

" 'It's hard to kill me just so?' he said. 
'Will this help you any?' 

"He picked up the empty Smith & Wes- 
son, leveled it and snapped it off. 

'■ 'My shot first.' he joked grimly. 'Now 
both together.' 

"There was a roar that shook the 'dobe 
walls ami my eyes closed at the flash. 

"When I opened them again I rose 
quietly to my feet and walked over. For 
across the table they both lay with shat- 
tered foreheads, while the blood oozed oul 
and soaked into the soft deal. 

"From the dead hand of Billy Hall I 
took the gun and broke it. Four cham- 
bers were empty, but in the fifth lay an 
old cartridge with the back so covered with 
jris that he could not have seen it in 
the poor light. But, partner, that cham- 
ber had been brought under the hammer 
the. first time he snapped it off at Shorty 
Cummins." 



Carnegie Brick and Pottery Co. 

M. A. MURPHY. General Manager. 

Vitrified Brick, Paving Brick, Fire Brick, Fire Tile, Fire Clay, 

Oust, Drain Tile, Acid Jars. Acid Pipes, Acid Bricks. 

Architectural Terra Cotta, Hollow Tile Fire-Proofflng. Semi-Dry 
Pressed Brick, Terra Cotta Chimney Pipe. Brick and Tile Mantels. 
Flue Linlnss. Urns and Vases. Flower Pots. All kinds of Vitrified 
Salt-Glaxed Sewer Pipe. 

Factory: Tesla. Alameda County. Cal. Yards: San Francisco, 
Oakland, Berkeley. San Jose. 

Office — 10th and Division Sts.. San Francisco. 



USE MAYERLE'S EYEWATER 
for one day and notice the wonderful effects 

Bright. Strong and Healthy Eves will be the 
n. Price 50 cents: by mail. 65 cents; Per 
dozen. $5. Prepaid. Mayerle's Antiseptic Eye- 
Glass Wipers, to be used »hen glasses blur, 
tire or strain the eye. * for 35 cents. 

Etc KbW ,1 (imnlwl andar that" S. 
Pare rood Oraf Act. Jane S», l*M. Serial TtTt 
George Maverle. German Expert Optician. 
Jen "Gate Avenue, near Webster. 
Phone \Vestj766. 

Maya: • • Gl«"»» rxt kod ttrenftbea the aye* and praaar** the «i|bt 




30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



BANKING 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With which are amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia, the Halifax 
Banking Co. and the Merchants' Bank of Prince Edward Island. 
HEAD OFFICE— TORONTO. 

Paid-up Capital $10,000,000 Reserve Fund $6,000,000 

Aggregate Resources, over $113,000,000. 

B. E. WALKER, President ALEX. LAIRD. General Manager. 

LONDON OFFICE— 2 Lombard St., E. C. 

NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 

BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlin, Cranbrook, Fernle. 
Greenwood, Kamloops, Ladysmith, Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster, 
Penticton, Prince Rupert, Princeton, Vancouver (3), and Victoria. 

YUKON TERRITORY— Dawson and White Horse. 

UNITED STATES — Portland, Seattle and Skagway (Alaska). 

OTHER BRANCHES— Alberta, 26; Saskatchewan, 18; Manitoba, 20; 
Ontario and Quebec, 62; Maritime Provinces, 19. 

BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England, The Bank of Scot- 
land, Lloyd's Bank, Ltd., The Union of London, and Smith's Bank, Ltd. 

AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The First National Bank. 

AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS— The Commercial National Bank. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Main Office, 326 California St. Branch— Cor. Van 
Ness and Eddy. ' ' 

A. KAINS, Manager. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Asst. Manager. 

The German Savings & Loan Society 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1.453,983.62 

Deposits, June 30, 1908 34,474,654.23 

Total Assets 37.065.263.31 

Remittances may be made by draft, post-office, or Wells. Fargo & 
Co.'s money orders, or coin by express. 

Office Hours — 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock p. m., except Saturdays to 
12 o'clock M. and Saturday evenings from 7 o'clock p. m. to 8 o'clock 
p. m. for receipt of deposits only. 

OFFICERS^-Presldent, N. Ohlandt; First Vice- President, Daniel 
Meyer; Second Vice-President, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; 
Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann: Secretary, George Tourny; 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Goodfellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— N. Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte. 
Ign. Steinhart, I. N. Walter. J. W. Van Bergen. F. Tillmann, Jr.. E. T. 
Kruse and W. S. Goodfellow. 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

Head Office — 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 
Capital Authorized, $6,000,000. Paid-up, $1,500,000 

Subscribed, $3,000,000 Reserve Fund, $700,000 

This bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout 
the world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells ex- 
change and bullion. 
IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LILIENTHAL, Managers. 

J. FRIEDLANDER, Cashier. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Ltd. 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Streets. 
Subscribed Capital, $2,600,000. Paid-up Capital, $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $1,200,000. 
Head Office — 40 Threadneedle St., London, E. C. 
AGENTS — New York — Agency of the London, Paris and American 
Bank, Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. T. ; Paris — Messrs. Lazard Freres 
& Cle, 17 Boulevard Poissonler. Draw direct on the principal cities of 
the world. Commercial and Travelers' credits Issued. 
S. GREENEBAUM. H. FLEISHHACKER, Managers. 

R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 

Mutual Saviigs Bank of San Francisco 

Building at 706 Market Street. Opposite Third. 
Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000. Paid-up capital and surplus, $620,000 

James D. Phelan, President; John A. Hooper, First Vice-President; 
James K. Moffltt, Second "Vice President; George A. Story, Cashier; C. 

B. HobBon, Assistant Cashier; A. E. Curtis, Second Assistant Cashier. 
DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan. John A. Hooper, J. K. Moffltt. Frank 

J. Sullivan, Rudolph Spreckeis. R. D. McElroy. Charles Holbrook, J. C. 
McKinstry, Rolla V. Watt. 

This bank does a savings business exclusively, paying Interest on all 
deposits. One dollar will open an account, and remittances can be sent 
by Express, Post-Offlce order or check. Write for particulars. 

Hours — 10 to 3 p. m.; Saturdays, 10 to 12 m.; Saturday evenings, for de- 
posits only, 5:30 to 8 p. m. 



Central Trust Company of California 

42 Montgomery St. Branches: 3039 16th St.; 624 Van Ness Avenue. 

Accounts of Individuals, Firms, Corporations. Unions, Societies 
solicited. Interest paid on Savings Accounts. Drafts sold on all 
partB of the world. 

Capital paid in, $1,600,000 Resources, $6,026,939.09 

B. G. TOGNAZZI, Manager. 



Charles Lyons 

LONDON TAILOR. 

ESTABLISHED 80 YEABS 

Importer and Dealer in Foreign and Domestic Woolens 

Suits to order from $25.00 up 
Overcoats" " " $25.00 " 

Trousers " " " $ 6.00 " 



1432 Fillmore St, 



731 Van Ness Ave., 771 Market St, San Francisco 
958 Broadway, Oakland 



Junk 25, 1908. 

GUn? fUtittHtw of iteign Affatra 

The three monster battleships which 
As to Bbazil. Brazil is having built in England 

continue in the shadow of mystery, 
and all the nations are wondering into whose hands they will 
fall when completed, and have sailed beyond the jurisdiction of 
Great Britain. Either one of the three ships is larger by one 
thousand tons displacement than anything afloat or under con- 
struction, and an extraordinarily heavy armament is being pre- 
pared for each id' them. Some wise ones declare they are for 
Germany, others equally wise say they arc for Japan, while still 
others believe that when once at sea they will be officered and 
manned by a detail from the American navy, and attached to the 
Atlantic fleet. On the other hand, there are those in high 
diplomatic circles who believe that, instead of sailing away to 
Brazil, when completed, the agent of that Kepublic will carry 
to his Government drafts on the Bank of England covering their 
price, but Brazil keeps right on insisting that the monsters are 
for her own navy; that she is the greatest of the La tin- American 
States, and is rapidly reaching the point in national import- 
ance where she will be recognized as the equal of any other 

American power, and if not now, will .- leed a corresponding 

nayy for her own protection. Prom Brazil's \ iewpoint of prob- 
able eventualities, it behooves the nation to begin to get her- 
self into a state of preparedness. So Ear as the belief that Great 
Britain will take oyer the ships is concerned, il will be remem- 
bered that about a fortnight ago the British Parliament, at the 
instigation of the ministry, refused flatly to take the position 
that the ships must not be sold to any interest that might be 
hostile to Great Britain. This does not mean that the Govern- 
ment of England is indifferent, but it does mean that King Ed- 
ward knows while all others are guessing. 

No student of Brazil's history and ambition since Emperor 
I iom Pedro was expelled from the country, ami a republic es- 
tablished, need be mystified over the domestic or foreign policy 
of the Brazilian Government. Practically every one of the 
South American Republics is contiguous territory to Brazil; be- 
lles, the aiva of Brazil is within about 400,000 square miles 
as great as the United States, including the islands, which meas- 
ures 3,700,000 square miles. Moreover, nearly one-half of the 
population of South America are Brazilians. It has been the 
dream of the statesmen of Brazil ever since the abolition of 
the monarchy to federate all the South American States and 
establish a great republic. Several id' the other Latin States 
have opposed such federal ion on the ground that Brazil, because 
of her predominating numerical strength, would dominate in 
everything of public concern. But the gradual influx of Euro- 
pean immigrants, especially from Germany, is changing public 
sentiment in that regard, and especially so since Venezuela be- 
came so deeply involved in troubles growing out of investments 
of foreign capital. The fact thai nearly all of Venezuela's 
Foreign complications are the direct outgrowth of investments 
of American capital, and the further fact that the Government 
at Washington seems disposed to enforce the claims of the Ameri- 
cans over the head, and in opposition to the decisions of the 
Supreme Court of the little republic, is causing all the States 

of South A i iea to wonder when their turn is likely to come. 

In fact, all the Latin States are cultivating the belief that sooner 
or later they will he subject to spoliation by France. Germany 
and England. The German colonics in Argentina and Brazil 
arc thought to be brewing trouble between the two States, so 
that Germany would have an excuse for sending warships and 
troops to protect the Kaiser's subjects, which warships and 
troops would never leave South America except by compulsion. 

In view of these possibilities, and because Brazil believes it is 
incumbent u] her to set the pace in preparedness for even- 
tualities, she having a preponderance of territorj and population 
in South America, as well as the greater commercial interests. 
No doubt this is why her statesmen have recently stated thai 
coming events make it necessary for Brazil to prepare to demand 
recognition, as to her national importance, as being equal to any 
other American power. While it is nol so proclaimed, it is none 
the less clear she means by "national importance" a national 
power that shall include as one confederacy all the Latin States 
of South America. If so, is it unreasonable to suppose that the ' 
three new Dreadnaughts that are being constructed for the Bra- 
zilian Government are merely the beginning of a modern navy 
that shall eventually equal that of any other "American 



June 25, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



power?" Ii" nut let us make ourselves believe thai the chief 
business of the Latin Americans is to manipulate revolution in- 
cubators, oor make us forge! that the building of an efficienl 
navy is backed by 80,000,000 Brazilians. Brazil's nan consists 
of twenty-three ships of all kinds, and 550 trained officers and 
8,000 men. 



Count ilc Wifte has exploded a 
Of General Interest, political bomb that is likely to do 

more damage to Russia than all the 
dynamite infernal machines that have ever been touched off. Al- 
though at the beginning, the chief of the Octoberists, ami really 
the leader as well as prime mover in transforming the Govern- 
ment into a constitutional monarchy urged the immediate for- 
mal ion of a Parliament, he now takes up the sword of the re- 
actionists, and not only denou'nees the Douma, but bluntly says 
there is not enough intelligence in the masses to advise, much 
less supervise, in the public concerns of the empire. But in spite 
of De Witte's denunciations, the Douma is going right ahead. 
[t has just approved the national budget calling- lor appropria- 
tions aggregating $1,250,000,000, and authorizes the expendi- 
ture at once of $46,000,000 for material and defenses in the Easl, 
and $100,000,000 to be expended in the same region, and for the 
same purpose during the year 1909, 1910 and 1911. Diplomatic 
bircles interpreted this to mean that Russia is not yet through 
with Japan. The Shah is doing- all any one could do. seem- 
ingly, to expedite the work of dividing his kingdom between 
Russia and Great Britain. The atrocities which he is inflicting 
upon the revolutionists and their families have never been sur- 
passed in the history of the world, hut in spite of it all, the revo- 
lutionists are gaining ground everywhere. Russia has no oc- 
casion to wait longer to take possession. In fact, the civilized 
nations demand that the Shah he brought lo time in a most 
summary manner. Japan's new cabinet announces that its 
national and foreign policy will he very conservative, but that 
the war establishment will in no wise he neglected. The agi- 
tation still continues in Germany over the maneuvres of a Brit- 
ish fleet of 101 warships in llie North Sea a feu weeks ago. 
Germany sees only a menace in il. and Britishers everywhere are 
enjoying the squirming. Il was the largest parade of warships 
in the history of the world, and in battle maneuvres, ai thai. The 
next largest flee! was thai of Germany, a fe« weeks before, in 

the same waters. It paraded sixty-two in all. Taiagua. 

Honduras and Guatemala are Irving lo spend the hoi weather 
doing the revolution act. Generals oui of work need something 
of the kind In replenish their stock of clothing against the com 

ing wet season. 



Well. well, at lasl poor oh], long-suffering San Francisco 

has come into her own. Perhaps il isn't much, lull after" all 

the hard knocks of the months jusl passed, the fen words of 
kindness coining- as the) 'lid even in a negative way, are as sweet 
as i he ambrosia of (he gods. Ami to think of their being uttered 
in the land of the heather, in far-awaj Edinburgh! Il was only 

a few davs ago ai the meeting of the liuernaiiiai.il Congrej; n- 

alists. After all the divines had talked on ad subjects suitable 
to the occasion. Reverend Charles R. Brown, the pastor of the 
First I longregational Church of Oakland, arose, and in the course 

id' his remarks, said: "I have B© drunkenness in h.din- 

burgh in a single dav ihan 1 have ever -.-en in -" 3 i Fran- 

cisco 5 in a whole month." H I' i n her Brown — you 

are a brick. Talk right out in meetin', and boost whenever you 

got a .In !. \-c.i: Hero's t.> vou. Preacher Brown! 



The innovation of a Tea Room for ladies has proven itself 

cess i ( i o [final Swain's Bakery and Restaurant 

The shopping !-. made (Hi' l mo njovahle for the fact that the 

may slop and chat over a cup of fragrant tea and nibble 

at some dainu confection. I. - a rest and a recreatioi 

bile the mush- plays. Tl ir the music are from 

three to five every afti moon. The new location is at 1841-1245 

Van Ness avenue. 



DR. ADOLFH ROSENTHAL 
Oculist and aurist. Removed to Hastings Building. 162 Post 
int avenue. Hours: 1 to 4. Tel. Douglas 8484. 



Fairmont* 
Hotel 

The highest attainment in modern hotel building and 
hotel keeping. 

Single rooms $2.50 and upwards. Every room with 
bath. Under management of 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 



DON'T FORGET IT! 

Cafe Madden 

236-240 Turk Street., San Francisco 

Madden's will be the most beautiful dining place ever 
seen in the West. It will seat one thousand people, 
and embody all the latest features in decorative and 
culinary art. 

NOW OPEN 

Under the Management of JOHN A. MADDEN 
Formerly with the Palace and St. Francis Hotels 





*k R 


New 




sA 


Poodle 






Dog 






Restaurant 
and 


iSsMw-^i 




O 1 N. W. Comer 

n ° lel Polk 8 Post Ste. 


\2 




Phone San Francisco 




Franklin 2960 



Thompson's 
Annex 



40c 



SERVE AN 

IDEAL 
LUNCHEON 
O'Farrell near Fillmore 



Old Poodle Dog Restaurant 

824-826 Eddy St.. near Van Neu Ave. Formerly at Buah it., 
cor. Grant Avenue. Phone Franklin 63. 



The high art Japanese exhibit in the Marsh*? new Japan- 

roma at Hotel Fairmont, is well worth a visit. 



NATIONAL BREWING CO. 



TELEPHONE PARK 33 



"The Beer that Stands the Test" 

Orders for Shipping Filled on Short Notice 
Office. ..d Bre-.r, : CORNER FUTON AND WEBSTER STREETS 



33 



SAN PEANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



June 25, 1908. 



There are two articles in the August Overland Monthly 

that will certainly attract attention. 'One of these is that of 
Arthur Dutton on "Some Costly Naval Mistakes." The other 
is by Dan Dugal, a seaman with the big fleet, and is ''An Extract 
from the Journal of a Blue Jacket," and was written at Magda- 
lena Bay during target practice. Mr. Dugal makes some 
charges against the commissary department. 




FIVE GLORIOUS DAYS 
AT MATCHLESS 

DEL MONTE 

need only cost, you 
$24.75 

you can pay more if you wish. But this 
amount will cover your entire railroad 
fare, room and board for live days at 
the finest resort in the world. 

Write today for reservations 

H. R. WARNER 
Manager Del Monte 



Hotel Westminster 



Los Angeles, Cal. 

Fourth and Main Sis. 



American Plan 

REOPENED 

Rates Per Day, $2.50 Rooms without Bath 
Rooms with Bath $3.00, $3.50 and $4.00 

European Plan 

Sl .00 per day and up 
With bath SI. 50 an up 

F. O. JOHNSON, Proprietor 



HOTEL EMPIRE 

BROADWAY AND 6jJ STREET 
i Lincoln Square) 

NEW YORK CITY 

A FAMILY and TRANSIENT HOTEL 
of the Best Class 

N THE. VERY CENTER OF EVERYTHING 
WORTH WHILE 

CAFE and RESTAURANT NOTED for excellenl cooking, efficient service and 
moderate prices. 

Rooms with detached bath $1.50 ner dav and up. 
Roonft with private bath .z.oo " 

Parlor, bedroom and bath 3.50 

Send for Free GUIDE TO NEW YORK. 

W. JOHNSON QUTNN, Proprietor. 




Hotel St,. James 



OPPOSITE ST. JAMES PARK 

SAN JOSE 

Recognized headquarters for automobile parties. 

ALBERT BETTENS. Prop. R. M. BETTENS. Msr. 



St,. Sauveur Apartments 

1276 JONES, S. E.COR. CLAY STREET.Marine view, 
4 and 5 room flats. Every convenience. 
WOLF & HOLLMAN, Agents, 327 Kearny St. 



GILROY HOT SPRINGS 

OPEN THE YEAR ROUND. 

ACCESSIBILITY. — The keynote -to our success. Only 4 hours 
from San Francisco, including delightful stage ride over the best 
kept mountain road in California. Unsurpassed table, superb ser- 
vice, health-healing waters, telephone, post-office, ideal climate. 

The waters contain sulphur, alum, iron, soda, magnesia, iodine 
and traces of arsenic, and are very efficacious in cures of rheuma- 
tism, neuralgia, rheumatic gout, kidney and liver diseases, lead 
and mercurial poisoning, and all bladder and urinary complaints. 
Hunting and trout fishing. Rates $12 to $17.50 a week; baths free. 
Trains leave Third and Townsend streets at 9 a. m. Direct stage 
connection. Send for booklet or see Peck-Judah, 789 Market St. 

W. J. McDONALD, Proprietor. 



SPEND YOUR. 
SUMMER AT 



Pizmo Beach 



'NOT AN IDLE MINUTE." 



The Finest Beach 
on the Coast, 



Hold your conventions and club outings at Pizmo! 
You can live at the Inn for $2.50 per day. Special weekly and 
monthly rates. 
Elegantly furnished Tents in Tent-city for $6.00 per week for two. 

Fishing, Boating, Bathing, Autoing, Bowling, Tennis, Horseback 
Riding through the mountains; Clam Digging. 

Two large bathing pavilions, with warm plunge. 

The beach at Pizmo is one-quarter of a mile wide, and seventeen 
miles long. And is noted among the autoists as the Ormond of the 
West. 

Ask any Southern Pacific agent about summer excursion rates, 
or write Pizmo Beach Resort, 789 Market street. 



SANTA CR.UZ 



THE WORLD'S MOST BEAUTIFUL PLAYGROUND 



ELECTRIC ILLUMINATIONS, THE FAMOUS CASINO GRILL, FIREWORKS 
from the Big Ship BALBOA. 

Two Big Famous Brass Bands, Orchestras, Etc. The Famous Big 
Trees, Scenic A\ountains. 

Largest and most magnificent Casino and Natatorium. Climate with- 
out an Equal. 



NEVER A DULL MOMENT FROM JUNE 20th 
TO OCTOBER 1st. 



Anderson Springs 



Lake County, 

California 



The greatest resort for health and pleasure; the only natural 
mineral steam baths in Lake County. Natural Hot Sulphur and 
Iron Baths. Board — $10 to $14 per week. No extra charge for 
baths. How to reach the Springs — Take Oakland ferry at 7:30 
a. m., or Steamer Monticello. and Napa Valley Electric R. R. to 
St. Helena, auto stage to springs, fare $6.55, arrive 12.30 for lunch, 
or S. P. train to Calistoga. arrive 11.30 lor lunch; Spiers stage to 
springs; fare $6.S0; arrive at Anderson Springs at 4 p. m., distance 
21 miles. Fare, $7 round trip from San Francisco. Address all 
communications to J. ANDERSON, Anderson Springs, Middletown, 
Lake County, Cal. 



Mt. Tamalpais and Muir Woods 

TWO TRIPS, entirely different. To the summit of a high mountain; 
to the heart of a great forest. Trees 18 feet in diameter, 200 feet high. 



"TAVERN OF TAMALPAIS" 

At the Summit 



"Muir Tavern" 
In the Woods 



Via Sausalito Ferry, foot of Market Street. See San Francisco daily papers for 
Time Card. 




gjtsa rjM^!* 1 *** 




(ffalitottxOQriixjertisjer. 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 

The News Letter la a member California Periodical Publishers' Association. 



VOL. LXXVI 



San Francisco, CaL, Saturday, August 1, 1908 



No. 5 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER Is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott. 773 Market St.. San Francisco. Cal. Tel. Temporary 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco. Cal , Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway. C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London office— 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication in 
the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 



Half of the men who have hunters' licenses are not fit to 

handle a parlor rifle. 

Mr. Francis J. Heney is not accused of having taken that 

$:!0,000 away in a shirt box. 

Isn't it about time the idiots who want to kick up a row 

with Japan stopped their noise? 

It's about time that Richmond Pearson Oscillatory Hob- 
sun gave vent to another cry of wolf. 

Shooting of any kind of game or any kind of birds within 

twenty-five miles of a city should be prohibited. 

San Francisco will never be saved until the commuter is 

allowed to vote where he works, if he so desires. 

Thai modest wood violet. Douglas, the shoe man. it is 

said, wants to he given second place on the prohibition ticket. 

The English demonstrated at the Olympic games that 

lliev are ungraceful losers and the poorest sports in the world. 

We may admire the lawmakers, and we may obey the 

law, but we are not obliged to say that we are partial to techni- 
calities ! 

Cutting down the heavy tariff will increase the trade of 

the United States with all countries, and give all of our indus- 
tries a healthy boosl . 

Mi'. Hears! delivered a very fine Bp h the oilier day, 

ami Mr. Brisbane is I" be congratulated on his ability as a com- 
poser of campaign literature. 

The Anti-Imperialists are a! ii again, and have made 

Taft's election sure by endorsing the candidature of Bryan, Mr. 
Bryan cannot help having fools for friends. 

— -The Knglishmen took a leaf out of tin' Bryan convention 
book, and counted the successful contestants in (he Olympic 

games OUl jusi as it suited their sweet fawticv! 

Prohibition in California would mean a blight that would 

ruin everybody, including the prohibitionist. We hope that we 
may be saved the infliction of the narrow-minded sect 

Stealing districts by false registration is one of the new 

tricks of tin' Lincoln-Roosevelt League in Oakland. Mr. Sprock- 
ets is nol to be outdone by Mr. Heney as a practical politician. 

Mr. William Randolph Hearst sa\s that he will not ac- 
cept the nomination even if he should tender it to himself. Tie 
has resigned to himself this honor that ho might have given him. 

The man who shoots his friend, mistaking him for a 

doer, is abroad. The penalty should he life imprisonment! There 
SCUSe for shooting the friend and mighty little for trying 
to shoot the deer. 

The News Letter "Build Now" articles are having a vis- 
ible effect all around the bay etties. There is an impetr,- 
to till building operations. Lumber is cheaper, labor more plen- 
tiful and og than in years gone by. Build now! 



California should be known as the one State having the 

best roads in the world. Improve the roads and you improve the 
condition of your farmers. Improve the condition of the farmer 
and the whole community benefits. 

The Dean of Westminster refuses to allow a tablet to be 

placed in the Abbey to commemorate Spencer and his works. 
Who the hell is the Dean of Westminster, and who will know he 
ever existed a hundred years hence? 

If you will impart the information to your friends that 

they should investigate and "build now," you will confer a favor 
not only on the friends, but on the whole community, and at the 
same time be an advance agent of prosperity. 

The anti-Imperialists, the yelping pack leader, Erving 

Winslow, and others, are busy advocating Bryan. We knew that 
there was a hoodoo somewhere ! Was it not enough to be damned 
by the support of Parker without this added infliction? 

Boni asks for only sixty thousand dollars a year for the 

support of himself and the off-springs of Madame Castellane- 
Gould-De Sagan Talleyrand Perigord. This is only about one- 
• fifth of the names and titles this lady's money has acquired, and 
certainly she should be made to suffer for it. 

Cabrera has a pleasant way of deciding political differ- 
ences that is not at all to the liking of carpet bag Americans who 
mingle in affairs for revenue only. The native conspirators get 
the firing squad, while the foreigner gets fired. He's lucky if he 
doesn't get worse. 

The Police Commissioner of New York is something after 

the style of San Francisco's special police agent, Mr. Burns. Mr. 
Bingham has just asked that his salary be raised from $6,400 a 
year to $15,000. The times are hard, and he has had to keep 
up a certain amount of style, and. besides this, he does not graft. 

Mr. Gompers is ashamed of the pact with Bryan and 

Hearst. He advised Hearst to support Bryan, and he wanted the 
two to fuse. Now he denies the whole thing. Hearst still 
swears that he received a letter from Mr. Gompers and Gompers 
-ays thai ho didn't write any, and there you are! Maybe they 
are both lying! 

The prohibition wave is settling hack in the South, and 

many of the "dry"' States are agitating for a return to semi-wet 
conditions. Local option seems to be the thing when it is not 
high license. The trouble is, that prohibition does not prohibit. 
It simply means a larger number of law-breakers, blind pigs, 
speak-easies and a depletion of State revenue with an in 
of taxation. 

Mr. Keir Hardie is making a to-do about it, because Kinu r 

Edward has not included him in his list of dinner companions. 
anil is making it a political issue. Mr. Hardie is a fool. He 
did not lose much by not being invited to the "feeds," and he 
might have lost a good deal, as they say the king and his entour- 
■ it Mrs. Edward is not around, is very sporty, and large 
amounts are wagered. 

The Boston Herald eoes out of its way to lampoon the 

Hawaiians, and says that on the occasion of the visit of the ves- 
sels of the navy "the natives turned out to welcome the fleet 
?d of their outward garments" and "clad only in gar- 
lands of flowers." Nobody but a jackass New Englander could 
so insult a gentle and polite populace. The Hawaiian native 
is so far and away a better citizen morally and physically that 
there is no comparison, and in manners is the superior of any 
people on earth. 



E 



r^T 



CLAUDIANOS CONFESSES BDT HENEY DOESN'T 
SPRECKELS AND REFORM BUILD NOW 



BB 



Despite the many hundreds of col- 
The Clatjdianos umns that have been devoted by the 

Confessions. daily press to the vaporings and 

"confessions" of a drunken and de- 
generate Greek youth, despite the unprecedented activities and 
innumerable statements of District Attorney Langdon, and in 
face of all the energies and ingenuities of Detective Burns and 
his staff (costing the city $4,375 a month), the mystery of the 
Gallagher dynamite outrages remains far from solution. It is, 
of course, to be remembered that as long as three months ago.-- 
and a few days after the first explosion — Detective William J. 
Burns declared it was "no mystery." Whatever revelation, how- 
ever. Mr. Burns possessed he has steadfastly refused to divulge 
to any one else. This egregious sleuth, who himself remains the 
greatest mystery of all the unfathomed puzzles of the Spreekels 
Prosecution, is still pregnant with promise, but abortive in per- 
formance. 



But it is a curious coincidence that 
Timely. on the eve of Abraham Ruef being 

again brought to trial. Mr. Burns 
should emerge from obscurity and silence and suddenly become 
exceedingly active and loquacious on the subject of the dynamite 
outrages. While Mr. Burns still is adamant in his refusals to 
share his revelations with the public, he has not hesitated to point 
an accusing finger at Abraham Buef as the real procurer of Gal- 
lagher's assassins. It is characteristic of Mr. Burns that while 
he has failed to produce a single point of evidence that could be 
accepted in court as connecting Buef with these crimes, he has 
freely declared : "In my opinion, there is no doubt of the ab- 
solute guilt of Abe Ruef." Mr. Burns forgets that by his own 
actions and words during the past two years, his "opinion" has 
come to be of infinitesimal value to any one except Mr. Burns 
himself, to his side-partner, Francis J. Heney, to their patron 
Mr. Spreekels, and to those newspapers which, engaged in the 
bitter rivalry of developing sensational stories, in turn use and 
abuse him. The News Letter has no love for Buef, but it finds 
that Mr. Burns is deficient in results. 



Unsurpassed Pair-minded and justice-loving citi- 

C'ombination. zens must protest against intrigue, 

and it matters not at whom it is 
aimed. Whatever may be Abraham Ruef's guilt in certain direc- 
tions, it is a gross violation of the spirit and practice of justice 
that an attempt should be made to facilitate his conviction by 
bringing reckless and unsustained charges of other crimes against 
him. If Detective Burns is in possession of evidence to connect 
Ruef with the Gallagher outrages, assuredly he should produce it. 
Burns's unsupported accusations of Ruef's "absolute guilt," 
based only on the shifty utterances of the half-witted Greek, 
and on his own conclusions, can carry no weight except with the 
thoughtless. Too transparently, "the wish is father to the 
thought." 



The identification of the Lincoln- 
The New Boss. Roosevelt League with the Spreek- 

els Prosecution is a body-blow to the 
cause of true reform in California politics. The Spreekels 
Prosecution, by reason of its long course of studied deception 
and ignominious failure, is to-day utterly discredited. The at- 
tempt of its leaders to restore their lost prestige and to gain per- 
sonal political power by capturing "the works" of the reform 
movement can only confound, if it does not destroy, the latter 
cause. Mr. Rudolph Spreekels, whose passion for dictatorship is 
undisputed even by his most ardent admirers, has assumed the 



absolute control of the Lincoln-Roosevelt League's campaign m 
San Francisco. An "Administration Committee." of which Mr 
Spreekels appears to be body, soul and spirit, has supplanted 
the executive committee, previously appointed, and has been 
given, or has usurped, full power to manage the campaign. Mr. 
Spreckels's sway is undisputed: he is vested with czar-like au- 
thority. A free rein, of course, is necessary for the use of the 
"Bis Stick." If the Lincoln-Roosevelt League was formed with 
the intention of wresting the control of State politics from an oli- 
garchy and of giving the people a chance to rule themselves, its 
initial steps absolutely deny and defy its foundation. No citizen 
can hope to be a League delegate unless he is personally approved 
by Mr. Spreekels. The League clubs in the San Francisco as- 
sembly districts are onlv to be permitted to make "tentative" 
selections of their own delegates to the State, Congressional and 
municipal conventions. Such selections must be submitted to 
the "Administration Committee," and be honored by Mr. Spreck- 
els's "0. K." before they are ratified. By such tactics Mr. 
Spreekels has assumed a bosship with unparalleled powers, and 
proposes to enslave the rank and file of the League. Such an 
attempt to convert the League into a personal Spreekels machine 
will inevitably result in the total confusion of the League's al- 
leged aims and its ultimate disruption. 



Speeokelsism 

and Reform. 



The most scandalous feature? of Mr. 
Spreckels's assumption of the dicta- 
torship of the alleged reform move- 
ment are found in the facts that, be- 
ing the power behind the throne of the present municipal ad- 
ministration, he is already in control of strong political "pull/ 
and also that, by the grace of the complacent supervisors, he i- 
in command of a force of secret police, which, while maintained 
by the taxpayers at a cost of $4,375 a month, is at his beck and 
call in all his personal schemes of proBecution, persecution or 
politics. Unless a citizen aspiring to become a Lincoln-Roose- 
velt delegate is already persona grata to Boss Spreekels, he is 
liable to an "investigation" at the hands of Detective Burns and 
his gang of publicly-paid but privately directed sleuths. No 
citizen, therefore, can hope to sit in the councils of the League 
until he has been duly branded "R. S." with the Burns curling 
irons. Under such conditions, upon such a plan, the reform 
movement is destined to degenerate rapidly into a preposterous 
and pitiable farce. A personal political machine built up on 
such lines, disguised as it may be under the cloak of reform, 
and heralded by the most plausible protestations, cannot prove 
other than the must dangerous enemy of true political reform. 



It is seldom, indeed, that the News 
Mr. Heney's Fee. Letter sees anything in Mr. Hearst's 

paper to arouse curiosity or excite 
comment. Certainly it is most rare that anything appears in 
this chain of printed obscenities that deserves comment, except 
as adverse criticism, and as a means to call attention of the 
health inspectors to an unhygienic condition. Once in a while 
something does appear that is for the public benefit, and then, 
with the justness that characterizes the editorial policy of the 
News Letter, praise is given the hardened sinner for a good ac- 
tion. Within the last week or so, the bright young men who arc 
working for Mr. Hearst at fifteen to eighteen a week, unearthed 
a good story. In order to make an exceptionally good story, the 
receipt, on Mr. Heney's personal letter-head, Eor the sum of 
thirty thousand dollars, was reproduced in facsimile, and the 
question was asked as to what this fee was given for, and to 
what purpose was the money used after it got into Mr. Heney's 
hands. Up to date, Mr. Heney has not answered the question. 



August 1, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



a 



Mr. Langdon, who seems to be deputized to do all of Mr. Heney's 
office boy's work lately, Bays that it all happened before Mr. 
Heney became a "deputy assistant district attorney." Because of 
this, he waves a fat hand and wags a fa! head and says: "Get 
thee behind me, Satan!" All of which reminds us of the storv 
of the young man who discovered that his bride was the mother 
of twins, and had not the benefit of wedlock to excuse the pre- 
auptial multiplicity. The young man took his grievance to the 
father of the girl, and thai indignant parent refused any ex- 
planation on the ground that it happened "four years ago," dis- 
missing the complainant with the good advice to give the girl a 
chance and see what she might do now that she was married. 

Mr. Heney is probably quite right in keeping silence. There is 
no reason why any one should investigate his twins. They're 
his'n, and no one wants 'em, but the News Letter is interested in 
one thing, and it would oblige us muchly if Mr. Heney would 
answer the question without getting red in the face. Was this 
particular thirty thousand carried away in a hand-bag, or did it 
find its way to the bank in a shirt box? The shirt box feature 
is what pothers and bothers us. 



Claudianos, and his friend, Paudea- 
CliAUDIANOS THE Myth, varis, seem to possess the rare fac- 
ulty of vanishing in thin air at will. 
First they officiate as cook and assistant in a Marysville camp, 
and then they disappear, only to re-appear some thousand miles 
away, fleeing across the hot sands on horse back. Then they 
wander into a lady's boudoir in Reno or Carson City, and lan- 
guish just long enough to make themselves known. The last 
heard of this interesting sketch team, they were officiating in 
black-face as porters on a Pullman, and were making more 
money than when they made "copy" for Burns and Older. It 
is strongly suspected that they are going East to join Detweiler, 
another one of the unfounds of Mr. Burns's defection. 



Build Now. 



No stronger argument could be ad- 
vanced Eot the immediate purchase 
of sash and doors, particularly 
glazed sash, at the low prices which have prevailed for the last 
three or four months, than the action of all the window glass 
manufacturers in the country in raising prices on all classes of 
glass from 1 1 to .10 per cent. 

II is a known fact that the sash and door factories have been 
buying very little glass during the summer months, when prices 
have beetl low, and that, therefore, when il becomes necessary 
for them to pay the advanced prices on glass a corresponding 
advance will have to be made on all kinds of glazed sash and 
doors. 

The advance in window glass prices became effective July 8th, 
and already many of the sash and door factories have exhausted 
their supplies of glass and will now he compelled to buy at ad- 
vanced prices. Tn view of this condition of affairs, there is no 
iloulil that many of the sash and door mills will insist on raising 
the price's on all glazed material within a short time, ami the 
country dealer or contractor who has not secured an adequate 
aupplj In hike care of his fall trade will be compelled to pay con- 
siderably higher prices than have prevailed for the last six 
months. 



S\sn w \s Never 
So Cheap, 



Country dealers and yard men who 
order sash and doors immediately 
will be able to secure the stocks 
which the factories have on hand at 
extremely low prices, hut those who delay in ordering will prob- 
able have io Stand the advance in the cost of glass and also have 
to pay additional for the unglased sash, as there seems to be a 
tendency to advance all grades of millwork at the same time the 
proposed advance is made on glased material. 

The increases in glas> are about IT per cent on single. 30 per 
cent on A. W. double, and 11 per cent on B. double over the for- 
mer discounts. Window glass men say that there is absolutely 
no doubt that this advance in prices will be maintained for six 

i 



The sash and door associations 
Brii.n 1ND But Before have taken up the matter and are 
nir COMBINATION. doing everything possible to bring 

the various manufacturers and job- 
bers into line on prices. The cutting of quotations that has been 



done during the last three I lis bj many of the manufacturers 

has contributed to the demoralization of the market, and has 

brought about an era of low prices which bad not been equaled 
for mam years, and which has resulted in large losses to many 
manufacturers. 

With the advance in glass a steady improvement in the entire 
sash and door trade is expected, and heller prices may be looked 
lor within a short, time, provided the manufacturers and jobbers 
stand together in the maintenance of present quotations. 



Ignorance on the part of an indi- 
Engoubage Optimism. vidual, community, State or a 

nation may not be excused when 
every facility and every opportunity exists for its removal. Just 
now the building trade of the United States is unsatisfactory be- 
cause of the general indifference or neglect of the business edu- 
cational factors. The tim,e to build is when material and labor 
can be secured on most advantageous terms. That time is now. 
Ignorance of the present unusual opportunities, and the failure 
to take advantage of conditions which may not again present 
themselves for years, are inexcusable. 



Ignorance Due 
to Carelessness. 



This ignorance is due to carelessness, 
negligence or oversight on the part 
of commercial educators, as stated. 
It should be charged up to the short- 
comings of lumbermen, dealers in hardware, real estate men, 
bankers, commercial organizations and industrial associations. 
The press of the country occasionally prints an article setting 
forth the current advantages which builders may derive, but no 
systematic campaign for trie enlightenment of the people who are 
in a position to build ever has been launched. 



The time to build. This country is 
Phices aee Lower. suffering, if at all, with suppressed 

enthusiasm. The warehouses are 
full, stocks of lumber, building hardware, lime, cement and all 
other classes of, building material are more than sufficient to 
supply the present demands. Nominally, some manufacturers 
of building materials have not lowered their prices, hut in every 
line, owing to the slack demand, dealers are willing tn make con- 
cession to secure business. This is true of the glass makers, 
lumbermen, hardware dealers, brick and stone men, and of pro- 
ducers of almost every article that enters into the construction 
of dwellings, warehouses and office buildings. • 



There is a great to-do over in Ber- 
OsOAB Wilde and the keley, the home of culturine, over 
Berkeley CLERGYMEN. the fact that two poems of the 
late lamented Oscar Wilde have 
appeared in the Church Messenger, the official organ of the 
federation of churches of the university town. Already the 
clergy is up in arms, and the ministers have assorted them 
into two factions. One faction declares that on account of cer- 
tain unsavory things connected with the author-poet in question, 
the poems should be suppressed, while the other, banded under 
the flag of liberalism, thinks only of the beauty of the work and 
forget the creator. 

Curiously enough, there has not been the suggestion of an 
adverse criticism on the poems as literary productions; they have 
been acknowledged to be rare gems, expressed admirably. But 
the point raised by some of the virtuous church members is. 
that the personality of a Wilde should not be exploited in a 
church paper. . . 

The Reverend I. X. McCash, pastor of the First Christian 
Church of Berkeley, is strongly against the publishing of the 
poems. "The Church M SB) ttger is not the medium to bring 
Oscar Wilde's poems before the publi ■ '" sooth. The 

distinguished wearer of the cloth seems to forget, or is, perhaps, 
ignorant of the fact, that the wonderful creations of that master 
poel are not depending upon the Church Messenger for pub- 
licity. It mav be news to him. but the exquisite word-picture3 
of Wilde are known wherever good literature is known, and seem 
likely to be for quite a few weeks to come. 

I tip my chapeau to the Reverend A. S. Coates, of the South 
Berkeley Baptist Church, the leader of the Liberal faction, who 
"it is the admirable thought expressed in the verses which 
is of worth to the world, regardless of the personality 
author. The man should not be considered— only his works. 



SAN FBANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 1, 1008. 



The Eight Kind of 
a District Attorney 



District Attorney Everett J. Brown. 
iif Alameda County, has entered on 
a campaign which, if he continues 
with all his earnestness, will be 
instrumental in awakening the voters of the east shore 
territory to the awfulness of the curse of the race track in their 
midst. Before a largi audience at the First Baptist Church 
of Oakland last Sunday evening, the able young prosecutor said: 
"Drunkenness and rate-track gambling are the two great 
curses that are filling our penitentiaries with young men to-day. 
The existence of this evil is a burning question, and the attitude 
of the candidate for the Legislature on the race-track question 
should be the most important consideration in influencing your 
vote for or against him. At present our statute books look with 
benign countenance upon the existence of one of the greatest of 
the influences that arc sending our young men to the peniten- 
tiary." 

Distrid Attorney Brown is to be congratulated on the stand 
he has taken on this question. Now. if the different factions of 
the dominant parties in the State of California will lay aside 
their differences on matters of little or no importance, and unite 
cting men to represent the various communities in the 
Legislature, who will vote consistently until an anti-race track 
gambling bill is pissed and signed by the Governor, the people 
of the Golden Siate will forever be freed of this leach which 
long sucked the life blood of its youth. In the words of 
the Old Book, we say unto the voters who value humanity above 
a few tainted dollars. "Now is the accepted time — go forth to 
the polls at the next election, determined to do your duty!" 



It is reported that Bryan in a re- 
Tiie Depth of Bryan. ligious address at Lawrence, Kan- 
sas, on "Miracles." delivered him- 
self of the following: "He desired to strengthen faith in the mir- 
i s. "It is claimed,' he said, "that it is impossible to suspend 
the laws of nature.' Then he took an object from the table at 
!- - le and held it out in his outstretched hand. 'I am,' he 
said, 'suspending the law of gravitation at this moment.'" This 
I- the kind of rot that appeals to his followers, and it shows 
■ tli of the man, or, rather, his lack of depth or learning, 
lie is simply a subsidized mouthing mountebank. 



What a spiteful contemporary is the Examiner when it 

condescends to mention the Bulletin in its columns. In the course 
of its relation of a conversation between one of its reporters and 
John Claudianos, whom it accuses of dynamiting the houses of 
"Jim" Gallagher, the Examiner makes Claudianos speak of the 
Bulletin editorial department as "cheap skates" because Fremont 
Older would not pay the reward that the Bulletin had offered 
for "information" that would lead to the "discovery" of the 
dynamiter. Of course, Claudianos did not call the Bulletin 
people "cheap skates." That elegant designation was probably 
inserted in the "managing editor's proof" by that functionary 
after it had been "passed" by the "copy readers." for it is an 
undying policy of the Examiner to hate the Bulletin and to 
- Fremont Older, as it is the eternal policy of the Bulletin 
to despise the Examiner and to hate Bill Hearst; and neither of 
them loses an opportunity to billingsgate the other. There id 
this merit, however, in al! that the Examiner and the Bulletin 
sa*y of each other: It is absolutely truthful. 



Our naval officers accompanying our circumnavigating 

fleet, will find a wife in every port; but contrary to proverbial 

sailor usage, each wile will be legitimate. Perhaps that is why 
the wives are tagging after the fleet. In the circumscribed en- 
vironment of the home port, it is comparatively easy to keep an 
eye on these sailors: hut when they wander away from their 
boarding-house firesides on the "station," temptation lurks in 
every harbor, for the world is wide and women are beautiful. 
Even Ulysses, hastening home to patient, long-waiting Penelope, 
had to order himself tied to the mast while passing the country 
of the sirens: and the officers of our fleet are just as human as 
was the King of Ithica. Therefore it has been decreed by the 
petticoats of the armada that the wardrobe toast shall be re- 
versed — AVives and sweethearts, with emphasis on the better half 
of the naval official contingent. 



The Call expresses editorial regret that the national ticket 

is so short that there is no room on Bill Hearst's fool ballot 
for any one besides Bill, except John Temple Graves. The editor- 
ial writer of the Call deems it unfortunate that Arthur Brisbane. 
Andy Lawrence, Clarence Shearn and the rest of Hearst's pub- 
licists and statesmen are not given an opportunity to shine in 
the political glory of their employer; but he glimpses a glimmer 
from the day star of hope in the future possibilities of more elec- 
tions, with candidates "advancing down the line from managing 
editor to the man on night police." The sneer at "the man on 
night police" is gratuitous, unwarranted and cruel. Why is the 
editorial writer for the Call ashamed of himself? It is very 
probable that he achieved his first journalistic distinction as 
"the man on night police." else he would never have attained 
to such distinction as attaches to an editorial writer for the 
Call. And wherein is the "managing editor" of a newspaper 
like the Call the superior, intellectually, personally or morally, 
'to his "man on night police?" What do you suppose would hap- 
pen to the Call or to the Hearst newspapers if it were not for the 
"scoops" furnished by "the man on nisrht police?" I know 
what would happen, and I know that without the able and unre- 
mitting assistance of "the man on night police." the Call and 
the Hearst newspapers would, despite every effort of the manag- 
ing editors and the best output of the editorial writers, be more 
unfit for publication than they are now. and the good Lord 
knows they are bad enough even with the saving genius and un- 
tiring energy of "the man on night police." 



In the South, the largest space in the papers is given to 

polities, and rightly so. There is nothing that is so important 
to the people, and if all the people could be interested in politics 
it would mean clean politics and honest office-holders. It is a 
poor man indeed who cannot give time to political questions, 
and the man who does not register should he deported from the 
community, denied police protection, and made to live in a 
ghetto for the undesirable citizens. 



Mr. Kern, after a long experience as the attorney of 

the gambling trust of Indiana, says: "T feel that the great 
majority — in fact, the vast majority — of business men ami cor- 
porations are honest and clean-handed and law-abiding." This 
is enough to make the corporation hating Mr. Bryan squirm, but 
then they need the cash to run the race, and it's a losing on" 
anvhow ! 



The Inter-state Commerce Commission is now ready lo 

nominate the members of the block signal test board. Tin 1 rail- 
ways will be asked to make the tests as rigid as those of the 
board. The new board has been financed by Congress, and it 
will take up the work of block systems ami signals and attempt 
to have all roads conform to the Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion rules. 



WHIPPED CREAM. 



The large percentage of cream In Borden's Peerless Brand Evaporated 
Milk (unsweetened) permits of satisfactory whipping. If milk and uten- 
sils are thoroughly chilled. Use flat or coarse wire whlpper. Quickest 
results are obtained by whipping in bowl packed in ice. 




V CHAS.KEJLUSfir CO 
R EXCLUSIVE 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 



% 



No Branch Stores. No Agents. 
SPECIALIZING MEN'S CLOTHES SUCH AS WE DO IN THIS SHOP 
YOU GET THE VERY BEST MADE. YOU ALSO FIND ERADICATED 
THAT USUAL READY-MADE LOOK. WE GIVE MORE ACCURATE 
STYLE THAN YOU'LL GET ELSEWHERE. WE FIT YOU SCIEN- 
TIFICALLY, BEING EXPERT CLOTHIERS. 

The kin.i af clothes you cot hero are positive^ u, a eiass 
bj themselves. Journeymen tailors are employed ana paid 
- 1 wages lev their work. Every garment here Is hand- 
tailored. We haven't built our reputation on quicksands We 
flon't lav awake nights planning hew to take advantage of the 
gullible. Wo cater only to the intelligent dresser. 



KING SOLOMON'S HALL 

Fillmore Street, near Sutter, San Francisco 



At .a ST I. I !H IS. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 




'Oh OU ml/fir Oe dkUm wlifn 



Our old friends, "Anxious Inquirer," "Old Subscriber" 

and "Ignoramus" are once more contributing their Eoo] "queries" 
in the newspapers of this city, and the "exchange editor," who 
is also the Bnake editor and the dramatic critic, when he is not 
too busy "writing original paragraphs" inspired by what he reads 
in the "exchanges," has been "detailed." to answer the "corre- 
spondents." Some of these "answers" would lit the requirement 
>if a catechism devised for (he conundrum department of an 
asylum for blithering idiots; others are of studiedly humorous 
Complexion and provocative of such laughter as might be evoked 
by the pastoral spectacle of a fat cow prancing a hornpipe to the 
I line that the old one died on. My objection, however, is chiefly 
directed at the "answers" that inform the inquirer that "this 
department does not advertise business houses," or sarcastically 
announces that the information sought can be "obtained at the 
tree library." If the ''■'column" of "answers to queries" is not an 
advertising column, why insult the anxious inquirers by print- 
ing their questions, and then swatting them with the superfluous 
remark thai they have stumbled into the wrong joint. The "free 
library" stunt is, of course, merely an acknowledgment by the 
editor that he can't answer (lie question, or that he is too lazy 
to "look it up" in the office encyclopedia. Like most of the 
"departments" in the local daily papers, the "answers to corre- 
spondents" is a howling fake. 

Owing to the necessity of employing child labor in pick- 
ing, packing and preservation of fruit, the opening of the public 
schools of Bilen township in Alameda County has been post- 
poned a week. This is a clear evasion of the law, which pre- 
scribes that children of school age shall not be employed in 
manual labor during school hours. The condition is due to the 
refusal of a lot of lazy loafers infesting San Francisco and other 
large cities to accept the wages offered by I be fruit growers. These 
peasants prefer to hang around the cities practicing the tricks 
of vagrancy upon charitable citizens and easily-duped tradesmen, 
attending the meetings of their respective "unions" regularly to 
"denounce" the competition of "child labor" and "prison-made 
goods." Still, the loafing propensity of these unwashed serfs 
blatantly shouting for "the dignity of labor." docs not excuse 
the action of the school authorities of Eden township in furnish- 
ing the fruit growers of that district with the cheapest commod- 
ity of infant labor in the market. 

The dogs are eaiiiiu I lie dogs. Henej and the Examiner 

are scrapping over the offal of their respective kennels, like a 
pair of hvenas disputing possession of the corpse ol b member of 
the Gravediggers' I men. Heney says the K couldn't 

si.i \ bough! by the Southern Pacific Railroad Corporation 
it. had received $30, I the corpoi ■ d; the 

Examiner insinuates thai Ibuev received $30,000 from th 
tra Cosia Water Company and i •rruptly. It's a nasty 

scandal and emits as many distinct Btenches as the outfall of a 
Brannan street sewer. Happily, th 

beslime onlj themselves, and no harm will result, for it is im- 
possible to inilh i ink plague even by inoculation upon 
those already afflii ted v. ith lep 

Coopers' linen \e. 1 I] nt treasurer 

with' a gold badge as a "token ol esteem" from b - oopers, 

and in further "token" ol grs tide to him for not appropriating 
in in. own use any ol the hard-earned "funds" of the union. 

eal intent of this "presentation" is hard ti ne. I 

the union bane] lie v that they were 

etli appropriating, the esteem an. I gratitude of the union 

were wasted i trough the bunghole; if the intrinsic value of the 

in the amount of money in the nickel I 

honesty has not been adequately compensated. Its 

. that the treasury of Coopers' 

No. LSI never contained monej enough to pa\ for the 

wash" on a " i with the unredeemed 

pledges in a pawnbroker's window. 



Another objection in the "directoire" skirl may be urged 

in the probability, almost amounting to a certainty, thai the 

majority ol' the tee! thus ruthlessly exposed will I ul of ar- 
tistic proportion in the apparent Venus of Milo measurements nt 

the upper works. High French heels, that cram a number five 
foot into a number two shoe, can only mitigate the abnormality, 

and the artistic sense of the Fillmore sheet connoisseur will 
readily defect the fraud. Big-footed women cannot wear Hie 
ilireclnire gown with that grace of unconscious ease that has 
made it so popular with the small-footed women of the Parisian 
boulevards. No amount of canary seed padding to preserve the 
proper contour of ankle and calf; no display of Huff and lace, 
will compensate for the unlovely birthmark of big feet on women 
who wear the sheath gown and the slit skirt. But perhaps the 
women who will wear the directoire will not know that they are 
disfigured with big feet, or perhaps they will obstinately blind 
themselves to a fact that will be painfully obvious to everybody 
else. 

Billangdon should distrust the Greeks when they come 

bearing gifts.. But Bill is a simple soul, and not over-weighted 
with ordinary sense. Anybody can fool him all the time. He 
is, therefore, an easy mark for this Olaudianos. I wouldn't go 
about exposing such stupidity as Billangdon does for all the 
money R. Spreckels is throwing at his dirty birds. Even Bill is 
beginning to appraise his own incompetence, and he has an- 
nounced that when he finishes this bunko game he will "practice" 
on "private" clients. It is said that when a man goes into court 
as his own attorney he has a fool for his client. What shall we 
say when the litigant goes into court with Billangdon for an 
attorney? 

-California forests are being burned over deliberately and 



maliciously in Trinity County, and no one raises a hand to 
prevent. Burning the forests to get the heavy standing timber 
is l be most terrific example of waste that can reach any land. 
Burning out the underbrush in the Trinity timber country means 
that this county will eventually be a waterless waste, and that 
the timber will not spring up to take the place of that which is 
lumbered away in this deplorable manner. If the State of Cali- 
fornia has no official who believes it his duty to stop this firing 
of the woods, then the Federal Government should take a hand. 
The man who burns down a tree is a criminal. These fires do 
not affect the large trees, but all the second growth and the 
suckers are burned away. 

The railroads have wisely deferred the consideration of a 

general raise of rates until the first of December. The idea nt 
raising rates was a stupid one, and did not meet with public 
approval. It was in the nature of an admonitory rap on the 
public knuckles by the quasi-public institutions. 




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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEE 



August 1, 1908. 



HI 

1 



WWI"""-!. ■'•!!'•• •—u.f.i 



L30KER ON 







Can any scheme be set afloat, any plan to benefit the commu- 
nity, that is not resisted by some of the best people in it ? There 
seems to be so much protest in man, and when he can find noth- 
ing bad to fight, he compromises on combating the good. There 
is vaccination. Do you know that before .Tenner's discovery the 
face unpitted was the exception? Do you know that nine-tenths 
of the court beauties were scarred? Yet we have an organized 
opposition to one of the greatest boons ever bestowed by science 
upon humanity. Every blessing we have has been gained 
through the school of experience, and when it is gained, millions 
who profit by it unite in doing everything in their power to em- 
barrass its application. Of course, there is such a thing as im- 
pure vaccine; no one is quicker to own to that than the most 
strenuous disciple of vaccination. But vaccination on the whole 
is good; it is a preventive, and he who opposes it is a reactionary 
of the most pronounced type. When I was in India, I noted 
that the majority of people had been afflicted because their re- 
ligion opposes vaccination, just as Christianity did the use of 
anesthetics in child-birth because it negatived the curse pro- 
nounced against women. Perhaps if one of those preachers had 
been forced to have a baby, his orthodoxy would have been some- 
what allayed with progressive ideas. You remember the howl ol 
indignation raised against Dr. Blue; but he carried his point, and 
I wish we had more like him. The common cry that "people got 
along before we were troubled with these new-fangled notions" 
is the creed of that cursed conservativism that has kept the 
world back. Old mistakes sit on a man like old shoes, every new 
thing is an innovation, and every innovation a curse. After a 
custom reaches a certain age, its faults are hidden by its moss 
of reverence; it reaches the dignity of a creed, the sanctity of a 
doctrine. The world and everything in it has improved. Of 
course, distance in years, like distance in time, mellows the view ; 
everything is hallowed by its remoteness. We are in an age of 
change, and effect is following cause with a rapidity before un- 
known. People are divided into the negatives, who don't care, 
and the positives, who are pro and con. Half of our kickers 
kick as a cheap way of evincing their individuality. Just as 
when we spoke of extepding the Pan-handle of the Park, there 
was a general howl about taxing the city from men who had 
nothing to pay taxes on, and always dodged their poll tax. But 
vaccination has come to stay, and small-pox is going to stay 

away. 

* * * 

I have spoken with several Americans of this much mooted 
Yaqui question. All agree that the summary measures of the 
Mexican Government are essential, and that the objections are 
based on mawkish sentiment. A gentleman, speaking of these 
Indians, said : "They are simply unspeakable, and all this talk 
of their not molesting Americans is the merest moonshine. These 
Indians," he continued, "will attack anybody, men, women and 
children, and if they succeed, torture follows." I know nothing 
of this matter personally, but we still hear the British Govern- 
ment arraigned for the massacre of Glencoe under William III, 
and the expulsion of the Arcadians. The Highlanders of those 
days were a law unto themselves; there was no safety in their 
country, no security for anybody. They were free-booters, and 
courted the extermination that followed. The Arcadians were 
a menace after No,va Scotia became a colony of England. They 
were given the choice between remaining at peace with their 
loyal neighbors, and obeying the laws, or leaving the country. 
They chose the latter, and that is all there is to it. I know not 
whether the Mexican Government has followed our example and 
robbed the Indians. But whether she has or not, it is not sup- 
posed that these people are to be permitted to glut their ven- 
geance by murdering women and children. If we had followed 
up our knavery by suppressing any manifestations of insurrec- 
tion, our history of Indian wars would have been in fewer vol- 
umes. We have put an end to Indian disturbances at last, 
effected in over a century what Mexico has almost accomplished 
in half the time. It is not whether the Indians have been robbed, 
but whether they are to continue taking vengeance on women and 



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children for what they have suffered from the Government. The 
Northwest Mounted Police keep everything quiet in British 
Columbia; they arc tin- Rurales of the North. If we had had a 
like institution, we should have escaped much of what we en- 
dured. It is not whether we have stolen Indian lands, but 
whether we are to stand eternal bloodshed and turbulence when 
it is visited on the innocent. President Diaz has no time to 
waste on sentiment. Stern reality, leagued with expediency, has 
made him a man of blood. The lower orders in Mexico arc a 
herd of superstitious, ignorant brutes, to whom conciliation or 
compromise would be mockery and encouragement. In short, 
Diaz is arranging matters so that evolution, physical, social, 
intellectual and political, can get a good grip on his countrymen. 

* * « 

The prohibition cranks seem to be as cranky as ever. Some 
women in North Dakota — curiously enough, their number is 
"S3" — have petitioned President Roosevelt to forbid the use of 
champagne in the christening of the new battleship, North Da- 
kota, soon to be launched in an Eastern shipyard. It is interest- 
ing to note, in this connection, that the only vessel of the Navy 
christened in water wis the battleship Kentucky — think of it, 
Kentucky! Golly! 

* * * 

The poor old Russian navy! It undertook some maneuvres 
last month, and here are some of the results: Three collisions 
between participating vessels; one boiler explosion; one gun 
burst; two mutinies, due to poor food ; a captain injured by fall- 
ing from the bridge of his ship while drunk: and — nut a single 
target hit during gun practice! It would seem that Russia has 
not profited greatly from the military lessons taught her by 
Japan. 



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A.UGD8T 1, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



Secretary of War Luke E. Wright and hie family are promi 
ncni members of the old Southern aristocracy, and they have al- 
been prominent in the social affairs of the cities in which 
they have lived, but it is noi generally known that Secretary 
Wrighfs wife was Miss Kate Semmes, daughter of the famous 
Captain Raphael Semmes, of the Confederate navy, whose ves- 
sel, the Alabama, wrought havoc with United States merchant 
vessels during the Civil War, until her career was cut short by 
the LT. S. Cruiser Mearsarge, off Cherbourg, France, in 1865. It 
is interesting to note that two of our new battleships are named 
Alabama and Kearsarge, and are both in the battleship fleet that 

came to the Pacific from the Atlantic. 

* * * 

1 1 is a pity that onr own police cannot visit upon some of the 
fakers of this city as swift and severe a punishment as the Lon- 
don authorities have visited upon the rascal known as Agamya 
Guru Paramahamsa, sometimes called the "Tiger Mahatma." 
That wretch, an insulter of women as well as a swindler, is no 
worse than many of the frauds who ply their trade in San Fran- 
i isco to-day, to the cost, in money, reputation and peace of mind 
of numerous heedless women. Occasionally the local police get 
after one, but their efforts are half-hearted, and a weak prosecu- 
tion follows. The self-styled seers, astrologists, Oriental sooth- 
sayers and all that crowd, are about as big a fraud as can be im- 
agined,' and the practices of many of them are downright 
criminal. The county jail and the penitentiary are the proper 
abodes for these swindlers and degenerates. Society should be 
rid of them. 

* * * 

The report of the discovery of two new islands in the Aleu- 
tian group is not at all surprising to persons familiar with that 
locality. Volcanic action is violent there, and it was only a 
few years ago that a revenue cutter witnessed the actual forma- 
tion of one of these new islands, during a severe earthquake. 
That island has since been visited and surveyed, and it is not 
a great distance from the two just discovered by the revenue 
cutter McCullongh. It is worthy of note that the latest up- 
heavals have been mar Unimak and Unalaska, by which vessels 
pass bound to and from Bering Sea. The Coast Survey has 
surveyed that region within the last seven years, but it would 
appear that a new survey is now desirable. The region, with its 
many fogs, thick weather ami numerous rocks, is a dangerous 
Miie at best, and Pacific navigation demands that the Government 
bave it correctly charted. 

* * * 

Again is the United States called upon to lift up its strong 
arm in behalf of some of those made-to-order citizens, aliens 
at beart as they arc by. birth, who merely become naturalized 

Americans in order that they may continue In reside in their 
native lands, and to enjoy advantages ami immunities due to 
(heir American "citizenship," This time it is some "Americans," 
said to number one hundred, on the island of Niearia. in Turk- 
ish waters. The Levant is full of these people, and they have 
caused Ibis country no end of trouble and expense, A law should 
he passed requiring all naturalized citizen! for at least 

four years out of every live in the United States. A- il is now, 
many of them come to this country only long enough to gel 
their naturalization papers, when they return to their native 
lands and live there the rest of their days, caring not a thing 
for the United Slates, except , ls ., protector "hen they impose 
on their citizenship and stir up trouble in their native countries. 

American citizenship is too valuable a privilege to he abused. 

II should he more Btronglj safe-guarded and closed against 

fakers. 

* • * 

The battle against the Powers of Darkness, despite the scep- 
ticism of tie Glancing over a recent issue 
of the War Cry, the official bulletin of the victories of the Sal- 
vation Army, we are informed that a body of sharpshooters in- 
vaded the kitchen of the hospital on Alcana; Island, where 
they "captured a delicious dinner, and finished the route by 
Compelling the dishwasher to kneel with them and declare eter- 
nal warfare against the Devil.'" What was the matter with the 

• it tin- Sal • place him in tie 

gory of those whom the Scriptures state are damned already ? 

DR. ADOLPH ROSEXTHAL 
Oculist and aurist. Removed to Hastings Building. 162 Post 
street, corner Grant avenue. Hours: 1 to 4. Tel. Douglas 8484. 




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Tel. Dougl»s 2176 



8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 1, 1908. 



A good story is going the rounds illustrative of the art of 
complimenting. There is no conceivable subject on which people 
do not take pleasure in a well-turned compliment. They like one 
on their good looks, their wit, or grace, the books they have writ- 
ten, their touch on the piano, the puddings or pies they make, 
their babies, their sermons, their everything from the heavens- 
above to the earth below, and the waters beneath. 

To study the art of complimenting, one needs only to famil- 
iarize himself with recorded instances of those who have been 
past-masters in the wav of doing it both sincerely and delight- 
fully. 

When Sir Joshua Reynolds was fainting the portrait of Mrs. 
Billington, an entrancing singrr in her day. in the character of 
Saint Cecilia, listening to the celestial music on high, she took 
with her the great composer Haydn. She showed him the pic- 
ture. 

"It is good," he said, "but there is a strange mistake." 

"What is it?" hastily asked Reynolds. 

"You have painted her listening to the anuM-: \<m ought to 

have painted the angels listening to her." 

* *' * 

The Street Repair Association and the Board of Public Works 
have struck up a sort of partnership, and the inspectors have 
been stricken with a blindness that is appalling. Some time ago, 
a lot of cement that had passed the gauntlet of a dozen tests and 
inspections finally found its way from the Kentucky street and 
the Barneson-IIibberd warehouses to the auction mart of Spears. 
Here the gang bought it in at twenty cents a barrel. I am told 
that the auction house made a handsome fee in selling this 
cement at the low rate mentioned. Here is where the ingenuity 
of the horny-handed gentlemen who do the rough and tumble act 
in street repair work comes. They bought the major portion of 
this condemned cement and refilled the cast oil' sacks of the 
Golden Gate Cement Company, and other standard company's 
sacks, and then passed it off on the street work for the city of 
San Francisco as test-proof. Good cement costs at wholesale 
$1.95 a barrel, and there are four sacks to the barrel. You can 
imagine the profit that is being made by Mr. Spreckels's friends 
in this particular line. There is a lot of the rejected cement still 
in the Kentucky warehouse, and there is a further chance foi 
the friends of the honest reform administration of Mr. Spreclc- 
els to make an honest penny. 

* * * 

The farmers who are engaged in general agriculture should be 
at Davis, in Yolo County, for the three weeks beginning October 
12th next, when the short courses in agriculture on the Univer- 
sity Farm are under way. An especial feature at this lime will 
be practical instruction in irrigation, forage crops, cereals and 
sugar beets. 

In addition to the large portion of the farm which is now 
under the ditch, thirty acres are now under direct control and 
experimentation of the U. S. Department of Agriculture. Many 
experiments in seepage, evaporation, methods of applying water, 
etc., are under way and the farmers may have advantage of 
them all. 

The State is making an annual appropriation of $5,000 to 
better the quality and quantity of our cereals. Forty acres and 
more on the farm are devoted to this work, and much good is 
being accomplished. Grain grower, go to see and hear what is 
being done for your benefit. The sugar beet grower will also 
learn much that will help him. 

No man in the country is better qualified to instruct on Cali- 
fornia forage crops than Director Wickson, of the Agricultural 
Experiment Station. He will give a course on this topic, which 
is so vital to all the California agriculturists. 

If you want to know more about the Short Course in Agri- 
culture, write to the University Farm at Davis, California. 



The vacation time is come, and before going to the coun- 
try, the careful housewife is having her carpets and rugs cleaned 
and is packing them away for use when the family returns. The 
carpet and the rugs should be cleaned anyway, before the warm 
weather comes and the house given a thorough overhauling. If 
you want prompt and efficient service, you should try Spauld- 
ing's Carpet Cleaning Works, at 925. Golden Gate avenue. 

The high art Japanese exhibit in the Marsh's new Japan- 
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August 1, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



9 



PLEASURED 
WAND 




*VFaber jx? now/ but /ifa&samr ' 

— Cam -ffifcxvw* — 

By Baunett Franklin. 
"Tin' Chaperons" Dispels Gloom ul the Princess. 

Where is the gloom ul' yesterweek? It is gone, my child, gone; 
there will not be a vestige of il this fortnight in the Ellis-street 
house of musical comedy. You who sal — or slept — through "The 
Bridal Trap" may have your grouches dispelled through the kind 
efforts ul' "The Chaperons." The funereal atmosphere that seven 
evening and two matinee performances of "The Bridal Trap" 
created has been wiped away with one big swoop. An antedilu- 
vian "comic opera,'" reeking with embalmed jests, and possessing 
in its entirety about as much humor and entertainment as we 
might expect io line! lurking around an undertaking establish- 
ment has been superseded by a bright-as-a-dollar musical comedy 
that is as sparkling and hilarious as its predecessor was dark 
and dismal. 

"The Chaperons" makes for precisely the same sort of enter- 
tainment as the late "It Happened in Nordland." It, is full of 
action and exuberance, first-rate lyrics, and music with snap 
and character. This music is saturated with a soothing quality 
that will act as just the correct sort of a tonic for the jailed 
soul that has been accumulating cares and woes in these strenu- 
ous days of financial stringency. The libretto discloses a plot 
that — well, is not quite as complex as a problem play's, but it 




serves its intended purposes amply. It is all inconsistent non- 
sense, with just the right flavor id' inconsistency, 

May Holey, as pleasingly flip as ever, is back again, and tills 
the role that she did in the original production at the California 
Theatre some few years ago. First, honors unquestionably go 
io her. She is, in this instance, Aramanthe Dedincourt, the 

managing director of (ho English and Continental Order of 
'trained Chaperons; and I'll warrant the most sophisticated chap- 
eron that ever came from beyond the Great Divide. Why, I'll 
wager that there isn't even a sweet young thing at Mills' Semin- 
ary that could show May any points. She is sophistication per- 
sonified. As a type of the jollying comedienne, she occupies the 
front rank, and her occasional lapses into mild coarseness are 
oflsetted by her wonderful gayety of spirit. In addition to what 
(he librettist has made fall to her lot, she interpolates her shop 
girl specialty, which you will remember as seeing but recently at 
the Orpheum, and it appealed to me as being even more funny 
in the musical comedy atmosphere. 

Oscar C. Apfel, the resourceful, officiates as Adam Hogg, a 
pork-packer of Cincinnati traveling abroad, whose sole occupa- 
tion seems to be the handing out of immense chunks of coin of 
the realm on the slightest provocation to operatic singers and 
impresarios in the usual musical comedy way. He handles his 
role dryly in the even, capable Apfel manner. 

Then there is Arthur Cunningham, who invests the part of 
Signor Bassini, the impresario, with considerable unction, and 
makes the most, of a song which exploits the necessity of every 
well-regulated comic opera having a "bandit" song, with its 
inevitable chorus of bold, bad bandits. 

William Bun-ess shelves his dialect of the Fatherland, for the. 
time being, and appears as Algernon O'Shaunnesy, a gentleman 
of Hibernian extraction. The trio done by Burress, Miss Bar- 
nett, and Walter Catlett, dealing with the tribulations of street 
car traveling, is one of the best things in the piece. Catlett, 
who is a new-comer, shows promise of being a valuable member 
of the company. His simulated Teutonic accent is excellent, 
and hi' has a particularly eloquent pair of lower limbs. Walter 
ile I. eon. also a recruit, scored with a happy topical song in the 
last act. 

The single fiasco in the east is Zoe Barnetl as Phrosia, the 
dime-novel saturated maid, an impossible character, even for 
musical comedy, which she plays in an impossible manner. My 
auditory nerves haven't quite recovered yet from the intemperate 
shrieking which she indulged in. 

Charles Couture's acting i- again as bad as his warbling is ex- 
cellent, and Evelyn Frances Kellogg gives Eorth some pleasing 
top-notes. Sarah Edwards and Christina Nielsen are adequate 
in minor roles, 

A particularly large lion's share of the credit for the success 

of the production should- be tendered Io Selli Simonsen, the 



WiU M. Oretsy, who will appear next week in "The V 
Laicyer" at the Orpheum. 




Roos Bros, announce the 
arrival of their NEW FALL 
MODELS in men's clothes. 



Fillmore at 
O'Farrell 



ROOS BROS. I,' "bLT 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 1, 1908. 



man with the baton. His is light opera music leading such as 
we are rarely privileged to get, and he has the rare faculty of 
handling the stage as well as the bandsmen. The chorus has, 
it would seem, been infused with a new spirit since his taking 
charge of the musical end at the Princess. 

All in all. you will find "The Chaperons" a most excellent an- 
tidote for "The Bridal Trap," the late unlamented. 

* * * 

"Raffles" at the Alcazar. 

Eugene Presberv's dramatization of ITornung's stories of the 
famous sassiety burglar-man is holding down the boards at the 
Alcazar for the week. We have had "Raffles" here before, but in 
general the present production is a superior one. 

Presbery has devised a play that is certainly ingenious, even 
if it is not thoroughly consistent and convincing. The playsmith 
artfully contrives that our sympathies shall always be with vice, 
and we are led to believe that when Mr. Raffles ignores all the 
rules of the etiquette books by robbing his very hosts, he is in- 
dulging in quite the proper caper. We become visibly annoyed 
when Captain Bedford, a new Sherlock Holmes, is put on the 
amateur cracksman's trail, for we want him to keep on burgling 
unmolested to the end of the chapter. He is so different from 
the ordinary yeggman; he is so polished and altogether likeable 
an individual that — well, one feels like inviting him around to 
one's house when the coast is clear and allowing him to get away 
with the family plate. To be robbed by such a man would be the 
keenest sort of a pleasure. 

White Whittlesey is the suave burglar gent, and he is quite 
an improvement upon himself. His sweet girlie methods, so 
tropically exploited in "His Grace de Grammont," have been 
practically shelved for the nonce, and he is really acceptable for 
the most in his characterization. But there are a few opportu- 
nities for his goo-goo methods, when he makes love to the hero- 
whine, so the caramel gels of the Saturday matinee will not be 
disappointed. 

We cannot quite picture Mr. Whittlesey chopping down trees 
and acting particularly strenuous in the "Never-Never-Land" — 
wherever that may be — which he constantly talks of visiting 
after the last act, hut generally speaking, he is surprisingly con- 
vincing. It is not near the fluffy Raffles I expected. 

John B. Matter does the best work of the evening as the sleuth, 
Captain Bedford. His stuttering enunciation is well conceived. 
Bessie Barriscale is merely elocutionistic as Gwendoline, who 
loves Raffles, but Louise Brownell is excellent as Mrs. Vidal, a 
lady who would love without the formality of the marriage certi- 
ficate. Adele Belgarde, Ernest Glendenning and Will Walling 
contribute first-rate bits. 

You will find "Raffles," interpreted as it is, a melodrama of 
considerable recreation — a sort of after-dinner pousse-cafe. 

* * * 

Variety in Vruulerille at the Orpheum. 

Character impersonations, terpsichorean stunts, clowning and 
singing of both the popular and classic kinds, are part and par- 
cel of the Orpheum bill this week. Of the newcomers, Ben 
Welch, who, to my mind, is the best Hebrew impersonator that 
has happened westwards, easily furnishes the most entertaining 
number. He has freshened up his monologue as we knew it be- 
fore, and, together with his genuinely funny burlesque dance- 
steps, contributes a decidedly happy twenty minutes. My single 
objection to Mr. Welch is the near-pathetic Italian recitation that 
he gives to creepy music. His art is so superior that it seems 
nothing less than a crime to lug in a piece of work so cheap in 
character. I am in the meagre minority here, however; an Or- 
pheum audience seems to enjoy an appeal to its superficial sen- 
timent. 

Wilbur Mack and Nella Walker hold what is programmed a 
"musical flirtation" rather neatly. Mr. Mack sings some good 
songs in the accredited nasal fashion, and Miss Walker is an ex- 
cellent "feeder" to his jollying. Their gags are bright and un- 
usually free from staleness. 

Harry Pentelle and Eddie Carr are a tramp -and a railroad 
agent who converse and sing. Their conversation is preferable. 

The Basque Grand Opera Quartette, composed of- three men 
and one woman, should have been mentioned after Ben Welch. 
They all have excellent voices, and their ensemble and solo 
singing make for a particularly good number. 

Sadie Sherman returns for a week with her talking and sing- 
ing specialty, and the Four Fords, "The Boys with the Chairs," 



and the Tom Davies Trio motoring in mid-air, round out the 
programme. That "star" moving picture of last week, which is 
retained, is almost as thrilling as the act of the mid-air motorists. 

» * * 

"The Servant in the Borne" at the Vim Ness. 

Charles Rami Kennedy's beautiful drama of symbolism, in- 
terpreted admirably by the Henry Miller Associate Players, will 
remain the attraction at the Van Ness Theatre this week, closing 
Saturday night. 



ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

The third offering of the Henry Miller Season at the Van 
Ness Theatre will re-introduce Miller himself in a new role — 
that of the Honorable Arthur Cullen, United States Congress- 
man — in Percy MacKaye's latest comedy, "Mater," which ou 
Monday evening is to have here its first production on any stage. 
It will be absolutely unlike any part Mr. Miller has ever at- 
tempted. Curiosity will naturally attend upon the play itself — 
the first comedy from the pen of Percy MacKaye to see the foot- 
lights. Hitherto this brilliant young dramatist (son of the 
celebrated Steel MacKaye) has devoted himself to poetic drama 
and to tragic themes. In fact, he is decidedly up-to-date in his 
choice of subjects, for the background of "Mater" is furnished 
by an exciting election campaign, with all the concomitants of 
"practical politics," graft and ballot-box stuffing. In spite of all 
this incidental atmosphere of politics, the play is not, so it is 
said, a political melodrama, but is a comedy full of the real 
spirit of fantasy. 

The Mater herself will be played by Isabel Irving, whom Mr. 
Miller has specially engaged to create the part. Frederick Lewis 
will originate (he role of the idealistic s'on, Michael, while Chas. 
Gotthold will be the jealous suitor. Hazel MacKaye, sister of 
the playwright, will enact the daughter, whose "advanced" views 
cause so much despair on the part of her bluntly prosaic wooer. 

* * • 

The musical comedy, "The Chaperons," has scored heavily at 
the Princess Theatre, and in consequence of its success, will be 
continued all next week. That will positively conclude its run, 
the management announces. The production is a most elaborate 
one from all standpoints. "The Chaperons" is reviewed in an- 
other column. 

* * * 

The bill at the Orpheum for the week beginning this Sunday 
matinee will be headed by Will M. Cressy and Blanche Dayne, 
who have just returned from a pleasure tour of the Hawaiian 
Islands. They will appear in Mr. Cressy's latest effort, "The 
Village Lawyer," which is said to abound in quaint and humor- 
ous dialogue, and presents pronounced types of New England 
character. Another feature of the coming programme will be 
Jesse L. Lasky's musical production, "The Military Octette" 
and "The Girl with the Baton,'.' which is pronounced one of the 
costliest and most pretentious novelties in vaudeville. Besides a 
mechanical staff of five, there is required the services of eleven 





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AUQU8T 1, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



trained musicians, and their tuneful numbers are introduced in y ■■ ■■ ■ . T ,, 

appropriate settings, which rlepict army life in 1,'ussia. India and /) K MflClHllfi Id K 
this country. A unique musical act will be introduced by Ines 

and Taki. Italian musicians', who arc making their liisi American 
tour. The Dancing Mitchells, the Creole, Black Prince and the 
Octoroon, will provide a quarter of an hour of excellenl diver- 
lisement. with effective changes of costume. Next week will 
be the last of the Basque Grand Opera Quartette, Wilbur Mack 
and Nella Walker, who will present a new sketch entitled, "The 
Bachelor and the Maid," Pentelle and Carr, and Ben Welch in 
bis Hebrew and Italian imitations. 



The Best Place to^Buy 
Your Talking Machine and 
Why. 



For more than a dozen years, "The Prisoner of Zenda" has 
been one of the most popular romantic plays on the American 
stage, and the stock company that can give it anything like an 
adequate presentation is assured of remunerative pecuniary re- 
turns. San Francisco's admiration for it has ever been strong, 
its last run at the old Alcazar having been extended from one to 
live weeks to comply with the demand for seats. 

It will be revived with Mr. Whittlesey in the role of Rudolf 
Rassendyl, Bessie Barriscale is assigned to portray the Princess 
Flavia, stage director Fred J. Butler will again be seen as Sapt, 
and all the other characters will be carefully bestowed. 

So widely has Anthony Hope's book been circulated and the 
dramatization thereof presented, that it is not necessary to give 
the outline of the play. 

* * * 

Mr. Leichman's MS. mass in A will be sung next Sunday 
morning at the Sacred Heart Church, corner of Fillmore and 
Fell streets. This mass has been given in several of the city 
churches, and has always made a favorable impression, and led 
to requests for its repetition. His "Salve Rejina" will be sung 
at the offertory. 



TO-DAY. 

The golden way leads on and on, 

So sweet is life with you, dear heart; 

How can I think — how can I know 
That sometime we must part ? 

As happy children play and sing. 

Their little lives one long June day, 
And all their world a daisied field — 

We laugh, and love, and play. 

Someday must come a soft good-bye ; 

For one, the dark — and dreamless sleep, 
And then our hands must be unclasped, 

And one, alone, shall weep. 

Ah, golden way, go on and on. 

A perfect, love-lit, blameless way: 
1 cannot, dare not see the end. 

But live and love To-day ! 

K \rim n I >\\ BOTNS. 



Just at this time, when the schools and colleges all over 

the country are opening for the fall and winter terms, fathers 

and mothers would do well to read the article l.\ Mr. John ('. 

Vivian in the Augusi Overland Monthly on "The College Fra- 
ternity Question." Mr. Vivian treats the subject dispi 
ately, but in such a manner a? to appeal to all who are anxious 
as to their children's lives in col! 



Mr. Mi Orier Kidder, the writer of epigrams. i> a con- 
tributor to the August Overland Monthly. He has given 
tide the title "Anarchy." It makes good r< e ■ _ 

any news-stand. 




THEATRE 

PHONE 
WEST663 

MANAGER 



Ellis Street near Fillmore. 

Class "A" Theatre 
Prices— Evenings asc 50c. 75c 
Matinees, except Sundays and hoi- 
Mays. 35c and 50c. 

Matlm S 'hla :ind next week onlv. the 

lOMdjr hit, 

THE CHAPERONS. 
Mi> Holey. William Burress. Evelyn Frances Kellogg. Arthur 
Cunningham. All the Princess favorites in the 




Go where you can choose from not one or two, but all 
the acknowledged world's best makes, and there is only 
one such place in San B'rancisco. That place is the 
Eilers Music Company. Here will be found the largest 
and most comprehensive display of talking machines, in 
the most modern and conveniently equipped parlors on 
the coast. 

We carry in large stocks all styles of the Genuine Re- 
ginaphone— which is a highest grade" talking machine 
combined with the best music box made. It plays any 
standard flat record and also tune sheets, occupies no 
more space than either a talking machine or music box 
alone, and costs no more than a talking machine alone of 
equal grade. We also carry a full line of Victor, Edison. 
Columbia, and in fact every standard make of these great 
home entertainers, as well as ALL the records for each 
ALL the time. 

If you will avoid future regrets, choose your machine 
after hearing them all side by side— make your choice 
from the machine, and not from some salesman's recom- 
mendation, who is probably selling one or two particular 
makes — it costs you not one penny more to get what you 
really want— the best— if you come to Eilers. Our prices 
are guaranteed the lowest. 

Here you can hear all the latest records— popular bal- 
lads, all the songs of long ago, dance music, concert, 
bands and orchestras, vocal solos, quartettes, monologues 
as well as the beautiful tunes furnished bv the Regina- 
phone. 

Then you can hear all the grand opera selections, and 
hear them on different machines— music that would cost 

you $5 or more to hear if rendered in an opera house 

if you had such an opportunity. 

We simply have ALL— everything— and invite you to 
call and enjoy the pleasure of music, yes, the best of 
music, in our fine parlors, whether you desire to purchase 
or not. 



From any viewpoint the 
place to buy your talking 
machine and records is at 
Eilers Music Company, ' 

975 Market St. 




"71 
'111 







MCOW.I 



New Alcazar Theatre 



COR. SUTTER AND 
STEINER STS 

B1LASCO * MITER, Owntti an* Mi-tf*r> ibioUi.lj "CI Mi 1" Brjlldlof 

Seventy- third week of the Alcazar Stock Company, commencing 
Monday, August 3. Mr. White Whittlesey, supported by the Alca- 
zar players, in Anthony Hope's great modern romantic drama. 

THE PRISONER OF ZENDA. 

Splendidly acted. Superbly staged. 

Prices — Evenings, 25c. to $1. Matinees Saturday and Sunday, 

25c. to 50c. 

Monday. August 10th — Mr. Whittlesey in "Monsieur Beau 



Orpheum 



ILLIS 8T . Ft lit riLLMOm. 



Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. UattnM 'very day. 

ARTISTIC VAUDEVILLE. 
WILL M. CRESSY and BLANCHE PAYNE, in "The Village 
Lawyer:" JESSE LASKY'S MILITARY OCTETTE and "THE 
GIRL WITH THE BATON:" INES AND TAKI: DANCING MIT- 
CHELLS: BASQUE GRAND OPERA QUARTETTE; WILBUR 
MACK AND NELLA WALKER in "THE BACHELOR AND 
THE MAID:" FENTELLE AND CARR: NEW ORPHEI'M 
MOTION PICTURES. Last week of the favorite character come- 
dian. BEN WELCH. 

Evening prices — 10c. 25c. 50c. 75c. Box seats, ill matinee prices 
(except Sundays and holidays). 10c., Phone West fiooo. 



Van Ness Theatre 



CORNER VAN NESS AVE. 



AND GROVE STREET 

GOTTLOB. MARX * CO . Propi md l|it Phon* Mtrkrt 50* 

Beginning Monday. August 3d. Matinees Wednesday and S 
day. HENRY MILLER, assisted by Isabel Irvine. Hazel Mac- 
Kaye. Frederick Lewis, Charles G"tthoM ami others, in the first 
production of a new comedy, 

MATER. 

By Percv MacKave. Mr. Miller as the Hon. Arthur Cullen. 
Next Offering— Mr. Miller as Sydney Carton in "The Only Way." 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER August 1, 1908. 

QHjp minister nf Iffomgn Affairs 





TWIRL THE ICE 

Do you know that a 

HIGH BALL 

made of 

HUNTER 
WHISKEY 



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same time strengthening. 



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The wonderful new talking 
machine without a horn 

The top closes over the record, shutting out all the 
noise of operation — the pure music of the record comes 
from a mahogany sound reflector. Elegantly made of 
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records. The finest talking machine made. Send for 
booklet- 
Price $200 



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LONDON TAILOR. 

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Overcoats" " " $25.00 " 

Trousers " " " $ 6.00 " 

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958 Broadway, Oakland 



Turks? Now in 
tiik World's Eye. 



Fifty-five years ago, the "'sick man 
of Europe," Turkey, was so ill thai 
France ami England had hi send 
armies ami warships hi (lie Crimea 
in drive Russia away from her purpose to kill the invalid ami 
appropriate his estate. And now conies Russia, .England and 
France to his rescue from internal dissensions, and a possible 
division of the sick man's territorial possessions between Ger- 
many ami Austria. Ever since the Turkish Empire in Europe 
was founded, it has by diplomatic strategy managed to secure 
the protection of its fellow nations by playing one against the 
other. Centuries ago the empire made it very clear to the 
iinwned heads of Europe that its destruction would be followed 
by wars and more wars over the distribution of its territory, and 
in all tin' years every nation of Europe lias had an itching palm 
for Turkey's great real estate holdings, hut meanwhile they have 
stood amply prepared to light any other nation that moved sus- 
piciously in the direct inn nf the rich prize. And so Turkey's 
national integrity and her territorial possessions have ever been 
secure against the itching palms of the nations of Europe, he- 
cause nf their jealousy of one another. But viewing Turkey 
and the Turks from the viewpoint of Anglo-Saxon civilization, 
both the Government and the subjects of the Sublime Porte 
are the vilest, the most brutal and the most murderous people 
that have lived as an organized political and social society since 
the beginning of the Christian era. 

But the danger that threatens the peace of Europe just now 
over the "sick man" is from quite a new source. An organiza- 
tion called "young Turks" is nnt only in a state of rebellion 
against the Sultan's authority, but against the system of Gov- 
ernment itself. But that is not all. Many of the Mohammedan 
priests are ignoring so much of the Koran as provides for the 
status of woman, and permitting them to participate in the pub- 
lic demonstrations of the "Young Turks" for a constitutional 
monarchy and a parliament selected by the people. In fear of 
something worse happening to him. the Porte has yielded, and 
an election for members of a parliament ordered. This attack 
upon the sacredness of the Koran shows that the Macedonian 
Turks — the younger men — intend to not only liberalize Moham- 
medanism, but re-adjust its tenets to the extent that they will 
no longer stand in the way of social and political progress. Ap- 
parently there is nothing in all this that should call I'm- alarm 
in Europe, but there is a great deal to disturb. The Macedo- 
nian revolution, which is sweeping down pretty much all oppo- 
sition, is the culmination of wdiat the people of that part of 
European Turkey have been scheming for ever since the present 
Emperor, Abdul Hamid, began to pillage the country at given 
intervals, under the pretext that the Macedonians and Albanians 
were disloyal to the Koran and becoming "Christian dogs." 
And the danger to Europe lies in the fad that the "young 
Turks" of Macedonia have the full sympathy of the quite one 
million Turks in the Balkan Slates, and tin' sentiment is grow- 
ing, both in the Balkans and in all European Turkey, that the 
Balkan States and Turkey in Europe, should be one nation, and 
that the new nation should he a Republic, fashioned after the 
French system. 

Despatches from the diplomatic centers nf Europe say that the 
agreement between Greai Britain, France ami Russia to protect 
Turkey in Europe against the schemes of the Macedonians is 
primarily to preserve the integrity of the Balkan States, aid 
secondary to postpone the disintegration of the Turkish empire 
"until a more convenient season." With nothing to divide in 
European Turkey, and the Balkan States maintained as they are, 
the way of Germany and Austria would continue to be blocked 
in the direction of Turkish territory in Europe as well as in 
Asia Minor. The situation may be said to he full of dangers, 
ami will continue to he until the Macedonians, who now hold the 
whip, develop their purpose more definitely; meanwhile, they 
iniend to hold onto their organization and continue to he in a 
state of preparedness to resume military operations lest tic Sul- 
tan attempts to deceive them concerning their demand for a 
parliament and a constitution. Berlin sees in the combination 
between Great Britain, France and Russia to preserve the integ- 
rity of Turkey a trick to divide the Sultan's empire between 
themselves, and hastening the day of the division by giving en- 
couragement to the Macedonians to attempt to establish a Gov- 
ernment of their own. 



A I 3U8T 1. 1908.- 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



M 



England, Holland and France have 
Going for Castro. intimated in a diplomatic waj to 

the United States that they shall 
boob, though each on its own account, make a rigorous effort to 
bring Venezuela to terms. The French Colony in Venezuela 
numbers about 4,000, am! they have $2,500,000 invested in the 
country, which the Government has tied up on one pretext or 
other. Holland's subjects have large investments there, which 
are more remunerative because of Castro's arbitrary interpre- 
tation of their concessions, and the same is true of English capi- 
talists. Neither of these powers are maintaining diplomatic 
relations with Venezuela, but each is represented in a commercial 
way by a consul. In answer to the demands of the three nations 
[or some sort of a settlement, Castro calls upon. Colombia, 
Ecuador and Bolivia to join with Venezuela and form a union 
ill' States "to defend themselves against the barbarians of Europe 
and the United States." It is believed that the Washington 
( lovernment will not give a very rigid construction to the Monroe 
doctrine should these three powers decide to use a little force in 
obliging CastTO to come to terms, but there will be no effort on 
i In- part of this country at this time to press the American As- 
phalt Company's claims. 



As to Persia. 



The Shah of Persia has the revolu- 
tion pretty well in hand, but he has 
his greatest work before him. Rus- 
sia and Great Britain have notified him that law and order must 
be restored immediately, and that if he cannot accomplish it, 
they will jointly undertake to do it for him — Russia operating 
in the north, and Indian troops of the British-India army oper- 
ating in the south. It is not generally believed that the Shah 
can rely fully upon either his army or his citizen subjects to ac- 
complish the work. In fact, the sentiment in Persian business 
circles is that the country would be more prosperous under Brit- 
ish and Russian administration. 



Prance and Germany are having 
Of General InteUest. more misunderstandings over the 

Moroccan affair, and Fiance seems 
In be getting out of patience with German intrigue, first with one 
and then with the other of the rival Sultans, and the French 
army is adding fuel to the flames by talking about "when we shall 

re-take Alsace and Lorraine." Japan has taken over all the 

Korean crown lands for Japanese occupation, and 110,000 Jap- 
anese merchants, mechanics and farmers have already availed 

themselves of the opportunity to acquire land free of charge. 

li transpires that the Emperor of Germany was the influence 
behind the scheme to place Count de Witte in power in Russia, 
bnl the Douina headed it off by intimating that the Count's re- 
turn to power for the purpose of permanently dissolving Parlia- 
ment would iiiusi likelj lie resisted by a revolution. 



THE WEIGHTY SUFFRAGETTES! 

The wave of suffrage which is passing through an interior 
county broke the plate ulass window in a country merchant's 
store. Of course it was pure accident, tso pounds of solid 
saffragette coming into contact through the point oi her parasol 
with the perishable elan It happens that the merchant is out- 
spokenly opposed to women casting a vote, ami the rumor 
spread that the damage had been deliberately committed. The 

reliant himself was among those who helped to discredit this 

ridiculous rumor, California women have nol yet reached the 
window smashing stage in their enthusiasm about suffrage. The 
ether da\ some English suffragettes stoned til. Prime 

Minister Asquith, and thus left a lasting mark upon I 
history, for the windows can never he duplicated. They were the 
old crown style, stone being used in the manufacture of tli. 
This is a lost art. and the window pane put in plan of the broken 
ones cannot match the rest of the ho 



FOR SALE. 

A bargain: Automatic addressing machine, cost $350: Rem- 
ington No. 6, $116; 5,000 stent - Sundries, f 

i0. Will he sold .heap. If interested, see manager, room 
18, 773 Market street. 



The new Japanese rooms (Marsh's* with rare, high Jap- 
anese art exhibit, are now open in the Fairmont Hotel. 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 

The Lyceum 

l his prepared hundreds successfully. Among the many graduated after- 
ward from the universities, there were graduated five after three and one- 
i i.i if years, one after three years. Three were ottered positions in the 
Stanford faculty. At this school you can save time and money. Excel- 
lent teachers, individual instruction, special courses. New term hegins 
July 27th. LTiOO Pine street, corner of Scott, San Francisco. 

Miss Harker's School 

PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA 

Home and day school. Certificate admits to college. Intermediate and pri- 
mary departments. New buildings; large grounds. Seventh year begins 
August, 18, 1908. 

Boone's University School for Boys 

BERKELEY 

Commences its twenty-seventh year, Monday, August 10th. Accredited to 
the University of California, Stanford, University of Michigan, Cornell and 
Pennsylvania. Apply for Catalogue to P. R. BOONE, Principal, 2029 Durant 
Ave. 



A. W. BEST 



ALICE BEST 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 



1628 BUSH STREET 



LIFE CLASSES 
DAY AND NIGHT 



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See Southern Pacific or Santa Fe Agent 

or Addreu O. W. LEHMER. Traffic Menetfer, Merced, C.l. 



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and Billiard and Pool Parlors 

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NATIONAL BREWING CO. 



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'TIS CHEAPER IN THE END. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 1, 1908. 




MANCIAL 




The New York stock market, received a set-back and an impe- 
tus during the week. First, Wall street was much troubled by 
the news from various States of the organization of leagues for 
the purpose of fighting an advance in railroad freight rates and 
the announcement that the Interstate Commerce Commission 
would oppose any advance that might be made. Then came the 
Taft Acceptance Speech, and all was well again, as the brokers 
figure that the policies of the next President, although based on 
the reforms inaugurated by President Roosevelt, will be safe and 
sound and sane. 

Another element that gave confidence to the money world was 
the pact made between Harriman and the Gould interests that 
ended the war between these vast interests, and gave each a hold 
on coveted territory. Mr. Harriman has not expressed himself 
as to Mr. Gould, but it is quite evident that Mr. Gould has been 
completely hypnotized by the little railroad wizard. Mr. Harri- 
man now has his ambition • realized, and he has the first real 
transcontinental line over roads owned, leased and operated un- 
der one management. Mr. Gould, who is .an intensely practical 
and human young man receives many valuable concessions, and 
has had the satisfaction of having shown the Harriman people 
thai it is safer to treat with him than to fight him. 



Some interest was manifested by 
Local Mining Market, the action of parties bearing the 

Fraction. The Comstocks suffered 
to some extent from the- same element. Tonopahs have been 
quiet all the week, with the exception of one or two stocks, and 
the cheap Goldfields have been quite active. To-day the com- 
mission charges will be increased from one-half to one per cent, 
and no commission less than one dollar will be accepted ! This 
should have been done long ago, and is a good move. 

The news comes from Tonopah that a new ore body has been 
discovered in Belmont. This consists in variety of finds of higli 
value in the hanging wall of the Mizpah vein. 



Big Mintage. 



There is an interesting fact con- 
nected with the mintage of the 
United States that has just come 
out. For the fiscal year of 1908 ninety per cent of the coinage 
consisted of gold eagles. There were seventeen different varie- 
ties of coinage during the year. Seven of these were in pesos 
and centavos for the Philippine Islands. One coinage for the 
Mexican Government, and was of the "dobe" variety. Of pennies 
almost one was turned out for every inhabitant of the country. 
The total for the United States in coinage was $215,711,862. 
This has been one of the most active years in coinage in the re- 
cent history of the mints. Of the amount coined, $179,238,337 
was of gold, and $16,532,477 in silver, or at the ratio of one of 
silver to twelve of gold. The Philippines called for more than 
twenty-five million pieces, valued at $18,121,825, or more than 
the total silver coinage of the United States. 



The Real Estate 
Bamboozlers. 



A Mrs. E. M. Smith has filed a suit 
against one Alfred Wehe and John 
C. Clarke, claiming that she has 
been swindled in tie Dingee Park 
deal in San Mateo County. It is alleged that the parties who are 
being sued told Mrs. Smith that they had contracted to buy 
the Dingee Park tract from Mr. Dingee for $850,000, while 
the real consideration as set forth in an instrument on file at 
Redwood City calls for only $50,000. It is further alleged that 
some clerk in Dingee's office connived with the defendants to 
defraud the public. I am not sure but what Mrs. Smith can 
make out a good case. The usual procedure is for some brilliant 
but impecunious gentleman to associate himself with other 
equally brilliant and equally out at the pocket individuals, and 
form a company to sell real estate. They then procure a willing 
angel who furnishes the money to make the first payment on a 
contract with the owner of the real estate. They then survey 
and subdivide, cutting up property that was bought at from $700 



to $1,000 an acre into from three hundred to one thousand dol- 
lar lots. At this rate, it is only necessary to sell a very small 
proportion of the property on which they hold a contract to pay 
for the balance. In any event, it is a gamble, in which the pro- 
moters stand to make in large chunks, and the angel may get his 
also, but if hard times intervene, or there is any mismanagement, 
the buyer of the lots from the Eealty Hot Air Company, Lim- 
ited, finds himself in possession of a piece of paper on which he 
has religiously paid installments, and which does not bind the 
aforementioned hot air company to deliver anything except after 
all the intallments have been paid, and which in many instances 
binds the real owner of the property to nothing, as the instrument 
delivered to the purchaser has nothing at all in common with 
the original contract. It leaves the would-be suburbanite 'way 
up in the air, and with no redress, as the impecunious promoter 
is still legally impecunious and has nothing to attach. If fraud 
has been practiced by the Wehe outfit, Mrs. Smith will have done 
the public a favor by bringing this suit. It may have a deterrent 
effect on boomers of other people's realty. The moral of the talc 
is. buy from the owner. He will be glad at all times to make 
better terms with you than any so called development and ex- 
ploitation company could make. See that the agent is duly ac- 
credited by the owner, and that he is empowered to make con- 
traits in the real owner's name. Recently a number of gentle- 
men boomers who have found the grass short in Los Angeles, 
where they have worked this installment real estate business un- 
til it is baldheaded, have removed their impedimenta, and are 
flooding San Francisco with their circulars and their agents. 
Look out for them. They are nearly all of them of the above ilk. 
They never pay their advertising bills, and often the newspapers 
are simply profit sharers in their swindling schemes. They own 
no property, and are simply working a large-sized gamble at your 
expense. 



A New Telegraph 
Company. 



A new telegraph and telephone com- 
pany has been organized to do busi- 
ness in Nevada. It is called the 
Western Pacific Telegraph and Tele- 
phone Company. There are three incorporators. Supreme Judge 
James G. Sweeney, J. F. Adams, of the Nevada Consolidated 
Telephone Company, and Alfred Kange, are the incorporators. 
The company will immediately commence the building of lines in 
Modoc, Lassen, Plumas and other 'California counties, and its 
lines in California and Nevada will connect with the lines of the 
Pacific States Telephone and Telegraph Company. 



The Morel 1 Air Ship fake will have an airing in the courts. 
One of the stockholders, and nt the same time superintendent of 
the "company," is over-zealous in calling the kettle black. In 
giving testimony regarding the issuance of a false prospectus, the 
Ots gentleman is not at all at a loss for adjectives with which 





HIGH GRADE 


INVESTMENT SECURITIES 




LIST ON RESUEST 




SUTRO & CO., Brokers 


TEL. K. 332 


412 MONTGOMERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



J. C. Wilson, Broker 



Member Stock and Bond Exchange. Stocks 
and Bonds, Investment Securities. 482 Cali- 
fornia St., San Francisco, Kohl Building. 
Telephone Kearny 815. 



Zadig & Co., Stock Brokers 

Tonopah, Goldfield, Bullfrog, Manhattan, 
Comstock, Fairview and Rawhide Stocks. 
Have option on shares best Rawhide proper- 
ties for a few days only. 324 Bush Street. 



August 1, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



15 



to belabor his erstwhile companion promoter. He called Morel] a 
crook, a faker and a thief. The probability is that <Ms is telling 
the truth, but you ought to hoar Morell. He also knows how to 
deal out unpalatable truths most probably, and the pot will look- 
like Ota when lie sets through. According to the testimony of 
Jacobs, this man Morell must be a dandy. He formed companies 
right out of his imagination, and bought their inventions and 
applied them to the Morell air ship and pocketed the money or 
placed it to his own account in the bank. Jacobs says that Morell 
drew $57,922 out of the National Air Ship Company's treasury 
during 1907. This hot air ship business, while it is precarious. 
is most profitable, evidently. 



A Chance for 
San Francisco. 



The Isthmian Canal Commission, 
Washington, will entertain bids on 
the following materials for delivery 
at La Boca on the Pacific side of the 
Panama zone until August 10th, 10 :30 a. m. This will give 
merchants and manufacturers an opportunity to bid against 
Eastern competitors, with a slight advantage in their favor. The 
articles wanted are fire brick, hay, moss, lumber, piles, locomo- 
tive cranes, derricks, counter-sinking and drilling machines, all 
kinds of electrical apparati, hardware of all kinds, and numerous 
leather and rubber goods, glass and glassware. 



A Fraud Ohiikr. 



The Post Office Department has is- 
sued a fraud order against the Oak- 
land Transcontinental Aerial Tele- 
phone and Power Company. The promoters were Harry P. 
Dwyer, Wade Hampton Shadburne, W. F. Allen, E. W. Bar- 
dack, Albert Jahnek, and Albert G. Sochei. 



The new cut-ofE on the North Western Pacific Eailroad 

will run from Larkspur to Groenbrae. The surveys are finished 
and the line will probably be run across the marsh. Through 
trains will be run from Sausalito to Larkspur over the present 
roadbed, thence across the marsh to Groonbrnc, through the old 
tunnel to San Eafael. An effort is to bo made to shorten the 
time between the city and San Eafael to thirty-five minutes. 



Wine Growers Organize. — The wine growers of the Livermore 
Valley have organized to tight the prohibitionist craze. The 
movement to light the prohibitionists in the Legislature was or- 
ganized by Mr. Andrea Sbarboro, of the Italian Swiss Colony. 



Mi. Tamalpais Railroad if Flourishing. — '['lie increase in the 
revenues of the Mt. Tamalpais Railroad for the past fiscal year 
is 85 per cent, or a net earning for the last year of L3 per cent. 
During the year the energetic management completed th 

line to the Muir National Park, ami finished the Muir Tavern. 



A National Mexican Exposition. -There will be a Mexican 
National Exposition at Puebla in 1910. The money has beet 
appropriated for the lii.-i building to he erected immediately at 
a cost of $50,000. The State Govi rnmenl is receiving plans Eor 
other buildings. 



The Fark Stadium will be built, and 
THE PARS StaDH i the Park I have ap- 

propriated $6,000 for the first, or 

north h\ west section. \\ hi his stadium will seat 

60,000 people, and it will he on.' of, if not the largest, in the 

world. The work >i eons! : ueii. >n will he directed by Commis- 
sioner Kirkpatrick, and the Reid Brothers an 
the plans. The en, in a spirit of patriotism, donate.! 

the plans for ibis immense structure. 1: is possible that a 
National Convention may he held in San Francisco om 

completed. An effort will he made t,. int. rot some 
of our rich nun with the object in view .0' having sections built 
from donations and named after the donor. It is such an im- 
mense undertaking thai no tune may be s. impletion of 
the entire work. 



Mr. Hill Wants .i Raise.— Mr. .lames J. Hill may have re- 
signed the management of his railroads in favor of his son. but 
'vidence that he has resigned his interview making to 
any one hut himself, and he is still crying for :i rise. II 

'it rates in this country are low beyond comparison. Re- 
ceiving hut one-half to one-third of the rate received in European 



countries, the wages paid railroad employees here average 100 
per cent higliei than those paid in Europe." Being opposed to 
;i cut. in wages, he says further that there is no alternative but a 
raise in freights. Mt. Hill has always had a calamity cry in 
serve, und since he has given over the reins to his son, he has 

iioiinllv megaphoned the country with his lamentations. You 

.lon't hear Mr. Harriman in this line of talk, do you ? 



Befuddling Court Decisions. 

Judge Kohlsaat, of Chicago, decided in the Monon case that 
it was not legal to pay for advertising with railroad passes or 
tickets. Now comes the Georgia Eailroad Commission and 
calmly sets aside courts, and states that it is legal and that it 
may be likened in practice as one man trading one commodity 
for another. All of which seems reasonable, and is referred to 
Judge Kohlsaat for digestion. 



A Big Man in Town. — Mr. George F. Baright, of the Pruden- 
tial Insurance Company, is in the city. Mr. Baright is one of 
the great in the publicity line, and he has charge of the spilling 
of printer's ink for the big company he represents. 



ONE HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY. 

One of the interesting events in the insurance world in 
the month of June was that of the hundredth anniversary of the 
Atlas Insurance Company, Limited, which occurred on the 24th., 
and was celebrated in part by a banquet at the Savoy Hotel, Lon- 
don. There were over 200 guests present, Herbert Brooks, Esq., 
chairman of the company, presiding.' The gathering included 
chairmen and managers of most of the leading British com- 
panies and shareholders and agents of the Atlas, with many of 
its chief officials and home and foreign branch managers. Among 
the latter was Mr. Frank J. Devlin, the company's Pacific Coast 
manager at San Francisco. 

The birthplace of the. company was Wills' Coffee House in 
Bank Buildings. Here, towards the close of 1807, it was first 
projected by a group of city merchants and bankers, among whom 
Sir Christopher Baynes, subsequently the first President, was 
prominent. At this time the Peninsula War was just beginning, 
and the Bank of England had to practically suspend specie pay- 
ments. Paper money of both large and small denominations eame 
into general circulation, and in some quarters, traders made at- 
tempts in a small way to supplement the authorized issues. There 
is extant a five shilling note which was at that time issued by the 
Atlas agents in the Isle of Man. 

At an early date, the company leased No. 92 Cheapside, its 
present office, and which, later on, it acquired as a freehold. At 
one time the Atlas owned its own fire brigade, the engine house 
being on Earl street, Blackfriars. 

At the time of the Company's Jubilee in 1858, it was repre- 
ented by six hundred agents, these working in the home field 
only. It was not until 1886 that it entered the foreign field for 
business, since which time it has steadily but conservatively in- 
creased its holdings, until to-day it is second to very few of its 
rivals in many of the most important fields, and in some perhaps 
leading the way. At present it has over 15,000 loyal agents at 
work. 

While the Atlas suffered, along with other British offices in 
San Francisco conflagration of 1906, it experienced no diffi- 
culty in meeting all obligations promptly, and at the close of its 
business for the past year, its assets exceeded $16,000,000, over 
$2,000,000 of which is invested in the United States. 




Palo Alto Planing Mills 

Our Specialties : 
HARDWOOD INTERIORS 

t/ND 

VENEERED DOORS 

Estimates cheerfully furnished 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE : 
1105 CHRONICLE BLDG. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 1, 1908. 




Fairmont* 
Hotel 



The other Sunday morning, the minister in a fashionable sub- 
urb preached against the apartment house. He declared that it 
was only another sign of the times that pointed to the decline of 
love of home. As most of his fashionable parishioners live in 
apartments, when they are in town, they naturally look the ser- 
mon as a. personal rebuke, and that young clergyman has bad the 
edge of his popularity dulled. A Burlingame matron was hold- 
ing forth on the subject the other day. "He showed a vast ig- 
norance of the place and real power apartment life has in mod- 
ern times," she said. "The idea came to us from France, a 
nation economical even in its luxuries. With them, the home is 
pre-eminent. The plan is to decrease the expenses of large es- 
tablishments, while retaining the comfort. It is one of the 
greatest of economical ideas, and is of advantage even to persons 
able to maintain a large establishment. Even in the largest 
apartments in Europe, as in America, a small staff of servants 
is ample. A cook, a butler and a maid are enough in most of 
ibe fashionable flats, whereas a dozen servants might be- needed 
in carry on the same amount of style in a separate house. The 
idea simplifies living for the very rich people — who can do away 
with the fuss and worry of liveried servants. The simpler you 
make home life the nearer perfection it approaches. The more 
entertainment, state and ceremony in living, the further you get 
from true home life. 

"But, best of all, the apartment is largely responsible for the 
great increase in country homes. Relieved of the responsibility 
of a big town house, apartment dwellers can migrate to the coun- 
try as soon as the first breath of spring is in the air. Society 
people, who naturally shunned the responsibility of two homes, 
now spend the necessary part of the year in town in a fashionable 
apartment house, and centralize their interest and their time 
in their country homes." 

Which argument holds water as well as any of the porous sub- 
jects of modern life. Certain it is, that all the younger matrons 
choose country homes for their wedding gift, these days, instead 
of a town house, as formerly. The Hopkins sisters, Mrs. Gus 
Taylor, Mrs. Will Taylor and Mrs. Fred MeNear all have coun- 
try homes. Mrs. Wortbington Ames chose a place at Fair Oaks 
instead of in town; so did Mrs. Tom Driseoll — in fact, the list 
of young society matrons shows hardly an exception, with a pres- 
ence for a town menage. Since the fire, very few in the older 
married set who lost their city homes have rebuilt here, pre- 
ferring to make improvements and additions in their country 
homes, and spend the winter in town in a hotel or apartment 
house. Mrs. William Crocker, the Parrotts, the Tobins and a 
number of others prefer this mode of life. 

Miss Carrie Redmond, who recently announced her engage- 
ment to Arturo Orena, of Santa Barbara, is shortly expected in 
San Francisco mi a visit. She is spending the summer in Santa 
Barbara, with the McKittricks, who have taken a house there, 
and there is a great deal of entertaining in honor of the young 
people. Miss Redmond has always been an intimate friend of 
Miss Ethel Cooper, and Miss Elena Robinson, and her marriage 
to Mr. Orena will establish a cousinship with the latter. Miss 
Robinson's father, tin- late dames A. Robinson, belonged to the 
Orena family. 

Mrs. David Crabtree (Eugenie Hawes) and Reverend Crab- 
. tree are spending the week in town dividing their time between 
Mrs. Robinson's home and other friends. Mrs. Crabtree is also 
a cousin of Elena Robinson's. The Crabtrees have lived in 
Bakersfield for the past year, but are spending the summer at 
the Schroeder ranch near San Jose, where Mr. Crabtree is offi- 
ciating for a brother clergyman. 

The Horatio Livermores have once more set the date for their 
departure to Europe. They have several times been on the verge 
■ it' going, and always the unexpected has happened. But now all 
the signs of the zodiac seem propitious. Their charming home 
on Russian Hill has been leased for a year to the Chamberlains. 
Mrs. Chamberlain belongs to the Santa Rosa branch of the Mc- 
Donald family, and immediately after her marriage last year left 
for a trip abroad, so this winter will really be her debut into 



The highest attainment in modern hotel building and 
hotel keeping. 

Single rooms $2.50 and upwards. Every room with 
bath. Under management of 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 

San Francisco society. The Livermores are at present at Mon- 
tesol, their picturesque mountain home, where they entertain one 
house party after another. Miss Edith Livermore, who is earn- 
ing her spurs in Germany as a translator, has just put forth a 
translation of a book on Wagner which is receiving favorable 
comments. 

The Mountford Wilsons have succumbed to the delights of 
camping, and this summer they have established a camp on the 
shores of Lake Tahoe. Last year the Wilsons and the Walter 
Martins roughed it at Cisco, and thoroughly enjoyed the novel 
experience. The servants boarded in a nearby country hotel, but 
Mrs. Wilson and Mrs. Martin cooked out of doors fur the family. 
The Walter Martins will later go up for a visit to the Wilson 
camp at Tahoe, and Mrs. Joseph Crockett will also be their 
guest. 

Miss Harriet Alexander, who has been ill ever since her ar- 
rival in San Francisco, has sufficiently recovered to go down to 
Uplands, the home of her cousin. Miss Jennie Crocker. Miss 
Jean Alexander has been at Uplands for a week or two, and 
has been entertained a great deal. Later, both girls will be the 
guests of their aunt, Mrs. William Crocker. The Alexander girls 
have not been out here since their baby days, so each day holds 
its novelty. They are making excursions to all the near-by 
places of interest at present, and before their return to New 
York they plan to go to Yosemite and Tahoe. 

Mrs. William Fletcher McNutt has arrived in Colorado, and is 
visiting her daughter, Mrs. David Brown. She has her little 
grand-daughter, Marie Louise Potter, with her, and rumor still 
insists that the child's parents, the Ashton Potters, have come 
to the parting of the ways. Bishop Potter, who died last week 
in New York, was an uncle of the dashing young lieutenant who 
married Mamie McNutt. 

Mr. anil Mrs. W. W. Simpson, of Whalley, England, are guests 
at the Fairmont, where they expect to be for some time during 
their visit on the coast. Alvin C. Dickinson, of fcondon, If. \\ . 
Guuson of Manchester, are also stopping at this hotel. 

L. M. Lawson and Mrs. Lawson, of Washington, I). ('., are 
at the Fairmont. Mr. Lawson is in the United States Reclama- 
tion Service, and is engaged in some of the work of his depart- 
ment in this district, adjacent to the city. 

Mrs. T. W. Huntington and her son. T. W. Huntington, Jr., 
of San Francisco, are at Del Monie for the summer months. 

'there have been a great many parties of Chicago people at the 
Fairmont during the oast few weeks. Chicagoans are critical 

travelers, and appreciate the comforts of the Fairmont. Among 

those now stopping heie are II. A. Wheeler, Mrs. Wheeler and 

the Misses Wheeler, Edward D. Stevens, Mrs. Stevens and two 
daughters, W. W. Hoot/,. W. A. Marlow and Mrs. Marlow, Win. 
W. Burroughs, A. ('. Emery and wife. 

-[the PENINSULA j^ 

SAN MATEO, CALIFORNIA 

A Twentieth Century Hotel of the Highest Degree of excellence. Amer- 
ican and European plan. Open February 22, '08. Thirty minutes by 
rail from San Francisco. Located in a Beautiful Park of thirty years' 
cultivation. All the charm and delight of the country combined with the 
attractions and conveniences of the metropolis. For reservations or 
Information address 

JAS. H. DOOL1TTLE, Manager 
San Mateo. California 



August 1, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



Bon. C. A. Qrow and wife will Ik' ;ii home to their friends 
after August 1 si :ii the Peninsula, San Mi 

Mr. and Mrs. Whitney Palaehe, of Berkeley^ are occupying 
their home at Pacific Grove Eor the summer. 

The discriminating travelers from the southern part of the 
State make the Fairmont their home while in Sun Francisco. 
There are now at the hotel the following: W. 11. O. Bryan 5 Dr. 
Landone, 0. R. Woodhouse, P. J. McGary and Miss Anna Mc- 
Gtery, 1'. M. Lee, J. Loverick Johnson, J. L. Hell and Mis. Belt, 
all cil' Los Angeles. A. H. Eenniston, Long Beach; Mi-, and 
Mrs. Winthrop, Howard Barnes, Pasadena; Miss Madeline 
Barnes, Mrs. E. R. Baldwin and child, of Los Angeles. 

Admiral Joseph Trilley, who. with Mrs. Trilley, is at his 
pretty home. "Shawmut Lodge," in Pacific Grove, gave a most 
delightful stag dinner last week, complimentary to Admiral 
Pahrenholt, who is visiting the Trilleys. Others at the dinner 
were Admiral Theo. F. Jewell, Major Wright, U. S. A., Lieu- 
tenant Bowen. T T . S. A., and John P. Pryor. 

M r. -and Mrs. J. Brendan Brady of New York, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Tilden 0. Toggnazzini spent a couple of days at Del Monte 
last week. 

Professor Josiah Keep, the present president of the Chatau- 
qua Assembly, which has jusl completed its summer session in 
Pacific Grove, has returned to Mills Seminary, after a couple of 
weeks in the Grove. 

Mrs. Charles G. Hooker and Miss Jennie Hooker arrived at 
the Hotel on Saturday for a considerable stay. They were joined 
the following day by Mr. and Mrs. George H. Lent, who, accom- 
panied by Miss Land, made the trip from San Francisco in their 
automobile. 

Prominent people who have registered at Pacific Grove Hotel 
during the week were Bishop Hamilton, Reverend S. D. Hut- 
sinpillar of Berkeley, Mrs. Lovell While, Mrs. Lcnore O'Brien 
of San Francisco; Robert Aitken, Lick Observatory, Mt. Hamil- 
ton; Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Murgotten, Mrs. J. A. Cruzan and 
Mrs. Hurff, San Jose; and Mrs. Margaret Ogier and daughter, 
who are accompanied by Mrs. Dombaugh, also of San Jose. 



Last year the foreign trade (d' the United Siales amounted 

to $3,378,000,000, and for each of the kast three years has passed 
the three billion mark. Remove the heavy tariffs and you can 
make it six billions in two years. Unrestricted exchange and 
/irnir, linn only for the struggling industry means a vast increase 
in business. 



THE STAR HAIR REMEDY, the best tonic; restores color to gray 
hair; stops falling; cures dandruff; grows new hair. All druggists. 



H 


otel St 


. Francis 


A study of individual 
requirements. 




Under th* management 


•< JAMES WOODS 



The select. Hotel of San Francisco 

HOTEL COLONIAL 

STOCKTON STREET ABOVE SUTTER 

American and European Plan 
Special rates to permanents 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Manager 

Telephone Kearny 4754 



WHY NOT MAKE YOUR HOME AT THE 

Hotel Jefferson 

TURK AND GOUCH STREETS 

Facing Jefferson Square 

A superior class hotel with every modern convenience and comfort. Operated on 
the American and European plans. Special rates to permanent guests. Special 
attention paid to the table— We invite comparisons. Management Noah H. Grav, 
formerly manager Alexander Young Hotel, Honolulu and Hoiel Potter, Santa Bar- 
bara. 

You Can Live At* The Hotel Jefferson 
Better And For Less Than At* Home 




VACATION QUESTIONS QUICKLY SETTLED 



Call or write to Dept. 
Ad. 948 Flood Build- 
ing for literature and 
beautifully illustrated 
booklets nil California 
Resorts and Outing 
Places. 

Rowing, Bathing, Fish- 
ing, Camping, Excellent. 
Hotels 

SOUTHERN 
PACIFIC 



Ticket Offices 

884 Market St., U Powell 

St., Ferry Depot. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 1, 1908. 



g>atwty 



An amusing incident in connection with the Sweitzer- 

Heyneman wedding festivities is being told. Everybody remem- 
bers the fact that the happy couple were compelled to exchange 
automobiles and continue on their road after an interruption 
consisting of a collision with a street car. •The party had ar- 
ranged to leave the house in an auto, keeping their destination 
a secret. Some of their friends presumed the Vendome was their 
destination; and they bad a number of clever postal cards printed 
portraying Sweitzer entering the hotel after an auto wreck with 
the auto tire as a collar, and requesting friends at the hotel to 
meet them with a brass band. The cards were printed the day 
before the wedding, and were successful as predicting the acci- 
dent, but the couple never went near the Vendome, but up into 
the wilds of Lake County, and the friends and the band are 
wailing yet. 

Mrs. Walter Martin entertained Miss Jennie Crocker at an in- 
formal luncheon in the St. Francis the other day. 

J. V. Coleman, the well-known clubman, returned from a three 
days' visit at Point Reyes, bringing with him two fine deer, each 
weighing 150 pounds. Mr. Coleman is being congratulated by 
all his friends at the St. Francis, and every one is looking for- 
ward to a treat of venison. 

The navy was well-represented at the St. Francis during the 
past week.- Some of the officers whose signatures appeared arc 
Paymaster H. E. Collins, Cassina B. Barnes, Dr. E. N. Reed, 
Robert L. Chormlcy, E. H. Douglass, Milton S. Davis, M. C. 
Shirley, Gerald Griffin, Joseph J. Redington and L. B. Porter- 
field. ' 

Among the guests registered at Hotel Kafael week ending 
June 26, 1908, were: \V. H. Shcehan, C. H. Hacker, R. W. 
Hill, Mrs. E. N. Short, Frank H. Fries, Mr. and Mrs. James 
McElroy, \V. P. Clarke, Mr. Louis James, Mr. and Mrs. R. 
Swayne, Mrs. Bowen, M. L. Cohn, George Colin, Joseph Triest, 
J. H. Dockweller, Mrs. A. E. Turner, Mrs. Frank D. Bates, Mr. 
and Mrs. L. Comyn, A. L. Straus, Dr. Francis Knorp and party, 
Mr. and Mrs. F. B. Lloyd, B. Bienenfeld, Mr. and Mrs. George 
H. Boos, W. J. Somers, Mr. and Mrs. A. Adams, G. F. Belden, 
J. H. Belden. 

Among the San Francisco people at the Saint James, San 
Jose, are the following: H. C. Marsh, George E. Crane, Mr. and 
Mrs. C. Withington, Miss Withington, Miss G. Nelson, F. H. La 
Faille, Henry Liebert, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Mohrig, H. Kothen- 
berg, N. F. Andrus, Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Springer, Mrs. Henry 
Ernst, B. B. H. Collier, D. Bourke and wife, B. S. Spahr, J. 
Del Valle, Jas. Appleyard, Ed. Miner, W. H. Cameron, W. A. 
Sexton, Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Dower, Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Ratti- 
gau. 

The youngest daughter of the house of Chabot was married to 
Mr. Leon Bocqueraz, prominent in San Francisco. Miss Claire 
was married from the Villa Rem! and the Reverend Father 
Blake officiated at the wedding, which occurred on the 28th. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bocqueraz will spend the early part of the honey- 
moon in the orange groves of the Southland. They are followed 
in their happy wanderings by the good wishes of hundreds of 
friends. 



An invitation has been issued by the Board of Directors 

of the ''San Francisco Belief and Bed Cross Funds, A 'Corpora- 
tion," to the dedication exercises to the city and county of San 
Francisco of Belief Home for Aged and Inlirm. This building 
was erected out of the money contributed to the relief of suffer- 
ers by the disaster of April 18, 1906, by generous people from 
all parts of the world. The function takes place on the afternoon 
of next Tuesday at three o'clock. Vehicles will meet the invited 
at the corner of Sixth avenue and II streets. The Haight or 
O'Farrell street cars will take any one to this place. Much 
curiosity has been manifested as to what had been done with the 
enormous amount of money that was left over, and no doubt the 
invited public and newspaper representatives will be glad to avail 
themselves of the courteous invitation to make a personal in- 
vestigation. 



BUGGY FOR SALE. 
In Alameda. A good business buggy; has been used only a few 
times. Cost $150 ; will be sold for $95. Apply Central Stables, 
Sherman street, near Encinal avenue, Alameda. 



The Civil Service Commission is anxious to establish a 

civil service examination for applicants for positions in the 
fire department. Chief Shaughnessy is energetically fighting 
against the commissioner's rules. He says that an education is 
not necessary — that one need only know how to fight fires. 
Shaughnessy is probably afraid that the rule may be made retro- 
active, and the educational qualification be made to apply in 
his case. Educational qualification, the ability to read and write, 
to understand regulations, to digest written or spoken orders or 
ordinances, is a necessity. The disgrace of the low, common 
and often-times disgraceful language used around fire houses 
would be avoided. Beal estate usually depreciates around the 
fire houses, and rents go down because of the bad language of the 
men when in enforced idleness. By all means, the commis- 
sioners should enforce the civil service examination, and, if pos- 
sible, apply it to Shaughnessy. 



Mr. J. A. Houlighan, the very efficient manager of the 

local agency of the Splitdorf Laboratory, has presented us with 
a copy of a very comprehensive booklet of the Splitdorf Ignition 
Automobile and Gas Engine Apparatus. It is illustrated with 
fine half-tones and diagrams showing the Splitdorf specialties. 
The one, two, three and four cylinder dash coils are described, 
the distributing Synchronized Multi-Cylinder Coil has a chapter. 
The vibrators are given space, and the magnetos of the "high 
tension" type is described at length, as is also the motor-cycle 
magneto and the Splitdorf low tension magneto, a compact and 
neat instrument. Plugs, cut-out switches and all of the acces- 
sories of ignition are found in this booklet. 



-Judge Sturtevant, at the time the News Letter goes to 



press, had as yet not delivered any opinion as to methods of 
•'municipal special agent" to arrive at the opinions of prospective 
jurors. Minions of Burns circulated petitions ostensibly in favor 
of the release of the United Eailroads from further prosecution 
among the men whose names had been secured for the Superior 
Court jury panels. By using cajolery, they had these papers or 
petitions signed. Thus they secured evidence of bias. Many 
men signed the petitions as any petition is signed — simply to 
get rid of the petitioner. This process of elimination to secure 
a jury that would be pro-prosecution is a dastardly outrage. 



$500.00 REWARD 



The undersigned will pay SS00 reward for information that will lead to 
the arrest and conviction of the party or parties who stole a large num- 
ber of cigar certificates from the warehouse of the United Cigar Stores 
Company at No. 517 Second Street, San Francisco. Give information 
to Mastick & Partridge, 1286 Flood Building, general counsel. 

United Cigar Stores Company 



Millbrae Kennels millbrae, calif 




Twenty minutes from 'Frisco opposite S. P. Station and San Mateo Electric at 
Millbrae: backed by ten square miles of heathei fields where the Jogs are 
exercised twice daily. 

Supervised by G. S. Hallwell who continues to breed and sell high class 
Boston Terriers and Bull Dogs. 

|f you wish to BOARD, BUY or BREED a good dog call or write 



The Millbrae Kennel Co. 



Office — Room 210, Cochrane and Bull BlJg. 
251 Kearny, cor. Bush. Phone Douglas 1937. 



August 1, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



19 









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77ie roorf to Talkie, from Placerville. 

This week the News Letter reproduces two splendid pic- 
tures of the new highway to Tallac from Sacramento. Tallac is 
being visited by from three to a dozen cars daily, and it is a 
delightful trip. The journey may be easily negotiated from Sac- 



ramento to Tallac in a day. The scenery along the State road 
from Placerville to Tallac is the finest in California. Owners 
of cars should lake the News 'Letter's advice and try this trip. 
It is a wonderfully picturesque outing. 





V " 

> 


^ - i^^ff 




*** 


**< *■ 



Bridge on the Tallac-Placerville road. 



To the Members of the Automobile Club of California. 

At a meeting of the Board of Governors of this club, held on 
July 8th, the all-important question of the marking of the high- 
ways was discussed, and it was decided to enter upon this line 
of work. With this object in view, the executive committee was 
instructed to prepare plans for suitable highway signs of a per- 
manent character, and submit a sample thereof for the approval 
of this board. Conforming with this action, the executive com- 
mittee prepared a sample sign and post of all-metal construction 
which was submitted to the board at a subsequent meeting, held 
on Friday, July 18th, at which tune the design was app 
and the executive committee instructed to proceed with the 
marking of Ihe highways between this city and Monterey and 
Santa Cruz, or so much thereof as the finances of Ihe club would 
permit al this time. The two routes selected are the ones most 
frequently used by local automobilists and tourists in runs from 
this city, and arc therefore entitled to first consideration. 

The marking of the highways is unquestionably one of the 
most important fields of work upon which the club ran profitably 
enter, and to just what extent il can be continued will be de- 
termined alter the cost of the work so far planned has been ac- 
curately ascertained, li is, however, the hope that the club can 
continue with the road-sign work until all main routes within 
a radius of from 200 to 250 miles from San Francisco are thor- 
oughly and properly marked in a first-class manner, all 
in order so to do, it will pi 

assistance from Boards of Supervisors, municipal bodies. 
etc., as work of this magnitude entails a great amount of labor 
and the expenditure of a large sum of money. 

respectfully, 
Saw bi il. But KB dent. 



duly -.'I. 1908, 



Lksi.ik B. Bores, Secretary. 



('. .1. Gray A Co, have issued a map of the "Automobile 

Roads of Central California."" This book contains all the infor- 
mation that it is necessary for the owner of a car to 

, i< staled where water. _ i. repair stations may 

maps are carefully compiled and up to date. 
100k itself is of p and easily portable. 



THE VERY LAST DROP 

of Weinhard Portland Beer is 
precious to the thirsty man, for 
he knows a good thing and is 
not going to let any go to 
waste. Why it's good is easily 
explained. Good malt and hops, 
good intelligent brewing, good 
and skillful care while it's ri- 
pening, and good, clean, sani- 
tary bottling. In plain words, 
it is good, honest beer. 

Guaranteed under the Pare Food 
end Drat! Act. 

All connoisseurs drink Wein- 
hard Portland Beer. It IS the 
delicious brew served at Bismarck Cafe, Cafe Francisco, The Louvre, 
Tait's and other leading cafes. Be Wise, Drink It at Home. 




CALIFORNIA BOTTLING CO. 

Bottling Agents 
1255 Harrison Street. San Francisco 

Phone Market 977 



USE MAYERLE'S EYEWATER 
for one day and notice the wonderful effects 

Bright. Strong and Healthy Eves will be the 
result. Price 50 cents; by mall. 65 cents: Per 
dozen. $5. Prepaid. Mayerle's Antiseptic Eye- 
Glass Wipers, to be used when glasses blur, 
tire or strain the eye. 1 for 35 cents. 

Mar#;ie'f Ef Water It guaranteed under the C. S 
Pnre Feed Dm* act. Jane tt>. 1»06. Serial TSTS 
George Mayerle. German Expert Optician. 




aajerler vtaenae 1 



Golden Gate Avenue, near Webster. 
Phone West )t66. 

1 and ■tranrtaen the eye* and piwir' i the right 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 1, 1908. 



Chalmers-Detroit 

"FORTY" 
Price &2750.00 



Formerly, Thomas-Detroit 



Chalmers-Detroit 

"TWENTY-FOUR" 

Price M500.00 



THE NEW GAR 




This Astounding Car ror $1500.00 

We take pleasure in announcing the latest addition to the CHALMERS-DETROIT (formerly the Thomas- Detroit) line. This new car will 
be known as the CHALMERS-DETROIT "TWENTY-FOUR." The production of a high-grade car at this price marks an epoch in automo- 
bile construction. Never before has any factory ATTEMPTED to build a car embodying as many up-to-date features at anything near the 
price. This car is the result of TWO YEARS' experimenting, and is now offered to the public as a finished product — NOT an experiment. 
Three of the new cars have already been run over 7,000 miles. Other makers are astounded at this move on the part of the factory. Other 
low-priced 4-cylinder cars will probably follow the advent of this new marvel— BUT — LOW PRICE is one thing, but LOW PRICE COM- 
BINED with QUALITY is another. This car is not a "cheap" car In any sense of the word. No car at $2,000 to $2,500 can approach in finish, 
smoothness or luxury. WE HAVE NO COMPETITION. Plea-se note that this car is NOT A REHASH of old parts, or a reduction in price 
of a car now on the market. Other makers may follow with a low price on UNSALABLE cars and HOLDOVERS. BUT CONSIDER the 
features YOU want in YOUR car. Then read the specifications. 

SPECIAL FEATURES. 

Now let us compare the mechanical features with some high-priced cars. 

The four cylinders are casl together, as In the latest Fiat, the Darrcfoq and a score of great foreign cars. 

We use the Unit Power Plant, as in the new 1 >eeauville, the Motubloc ami others. Motor, clutch and transmission form a single unit, so 
they cannot get out of alignment. • 

The body is suspended, for easy riding, after the style of the Mercedes. The valves are like those <>f the Napier. The throe-quarter Elliptic 
Springs are like the Renault and others. 

As completely fitted with annular ball bearings as the Mercedes, llotchkiss and Renault. Very few of the costliest American cars use so 
many. The actual cost of the ball bearings In this car is $103. 

Brakes heavier than we used, until this year, on our "Forty." Anti-hacking device to protect you on hills. 

The lubrication system which is now used on the "Forty." and which is being adopted on all leading cars. A multiple disc clutch — similar 
to that used on the Isotta, Flat and many others. The gas intake is water-Jacketed, t<> save you the trouble arising through cold gas.. line. 

Floating type rear axle, used heretofore only on the HIGHEST- PRICED CARS. Wheels, 32 Inches; tlrefl, 3% Inches. 

So simple in control that a novice can master the car in ten minutes. 

deliveries. — Deliveries will he exactly as promised. We have standing orders for 26 cars per on. ntii, beginning A.UgUSl 1st. 
Other makers will talk about their low-priced cars, show you blue prints, and deliver "hot air." Our cars are built and we will deliver 
the goods. 

PRICES $1500 F. O. B. DETROIT — Touring Car, Runabout, Tourabout (Searchlights, generators, gas lamps and tops are extra.) Made by 
CHALMERS-DETROIT CO., formerly E. R. Thomas-Detroit Co. This chance in name involves no change In ownership, personnel or manage- 
ment. It is simply made to avoid the confusion of two Thomas concerns operating on separate lines. 



Sold by 



Pioneer Automobile Co. 



524 20th St., Oakland 



901 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 



Auuust 1, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



21 




VOICHLB 



J^L 



The proposal made io. the American Automobile Association 
that lliey modify the conditions of the Vanderbilt Cup Race. 
so ms to make them correspond with the Ostend rules, was turned 
down by that body, at a meeting of the Central Conference Com- 
mitter, representing the A. A. A. and the American manufac- 
turing bodies, hold in Buffalo the other day. The suggestion 
was made in Paris to the Committee on Foreign Affairs, at 
which time it was staled that the action of the foreign clubs in 
refusing a sanction would be reconsidered, if the racing board 
would hold the event under conditions already in vogue abroad. 
This they refuse to do. It was the spirit of the meeting that 
any oilier action would be unfair to American makers, since it 
would leave them insufficient time to build cars to conform with 
the mles of the Ostend Congress. The hope was expressed, 
however, that in the event of the possible recognition of the 
validity of the position of the American Automobile Association, 
in the future, a uniform method of car rating might be agreed 
upon. It has been reported, however, that an "international 
flavor" will be given to this year's Vanderbilt Cup Race, by the 
presence of several foreign cars, as already four have been en- 
tered. The course has been selected,, and is twenty-five miles 
long. As has already been announced, it will be partly on the 
newly completed Long Island Motor Parkway, and partly on 
local, State and county highways. It is generally felt that the 
dignity of the governing body is considerably enhanced by the 
stand it has taken. 

A Good Roads and Legislative Convention bids fair to be- 
come a permanent organization, to be held annually, resolutions 
to that effect having been passed at the recent convention held 
in Buffalo, under Ihe American Automobile Association, with 
the co-operation of the National Grange and American Road- 
makers' Association. The committee to have charge of the ar- 
rangements for the 190'/) convention was appointed, and consists 
of the following representatives: Robert P. Hooper, of Philadel- 
phia, chairman of the A. A. A. Good Roads Board, chairman: 
Naium J. Batchelder, of Concord, New Hampshire, master of 
Ihe National Grange; James II. McDonald, President of the 
American Roadmakers' Association; Charles Thaddeus Terry, 
chairman of the A. A. A. Legislative Hoard; S. D. Waldon, rep- 
resenting the National Association of Automobile Manufactur- 
ers; Frank B. Bower, chairman of the A. A. A. touring hoard; 
Alfred Reeves, representing the American Motor Car Manufac- 
turers' Association; William II. Hotchkiss, president of the 
A. A. A.: and Frederick II. Elliott, secretary of the American 
Automobile Association, ex officio. 

Resolutions were passed to the effect that the Presidenl of 
the \. A. A. lie authorized lo appoint an executive committee 
of twenty-one members, including the nine above mentioned, 
which shall see lo ii thai the plans and purposes determined by 
Ihe National Convention of L908 Bhall be carried nut to their 
consummation, and thai the measures approved bj the conven- 
tion shall he pressed to passage and enacted into law. in the 
various States of ihe union, and in Congress. Tli.' committee 
shall also have pi Id to its membership, by a two-thirds 

■ ei' iis members, ihe represci il such other boi 



cTVlONOGRAM OILS 

ARE BEING USED BY THE 

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 
AUTOMOBILES and MOTOR LAUNCHES 



Pacific Coast Distributors 

Geo. P. Moore Co. 



721 Golden Gate Ave. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



FRANKLIN 

Automobiles 



Two Franklin cars make perfect scores in 
1700 mile Glidden tour. Seals on spare 
parts bag unbroken. 

The Franklin is easy to handle and strong 
and safe. It doesn't jolt and rack itself. It 
lasts longer than a heavy automobile, rides 
easier and carries the same load farther in a 
day. 

Is it good business to pay for useless 
weight? 

Write for the catalogue describing Franklin 
models. 



Consolidated Motor Car Co. 

S. C. CHAPMAN, Manager 

406 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

Telephone Franklin .3910. 



Los Angeles Branch 
1018 S. Main St. 




H. W. BOGEN 




Automobile Accessories of all kinds. 
AJAX Tires 




460 Golden Gate Ave. 

Phone Franklin 249 

SAN FRANCISCO 



SAN FRANCISCO 



LOS ANGELBS 



Chanslor 8 Lyon Motor Supply Co. 



(I5C0RF0MTEDI 



Automobile Accessories 

LARGEST AND MOST COM- 
FLETE STOCK ON THE COAST 

Agents (or HARTFORD TIRES 



B. D. McCOY 

Secretary ud Manager 



542-4-6 GOLDEN GATE AVEM E 

San Frubaco, C«J. 



LOCOMOBILES FOR HIRE 

SPECIAL RATES FOR THEATRE AND SHOPPING PARTIES. 

GENERAL MOTOR CAR CO. 



Pboa. M.rt.t 1298 



14tt> •.<! V.l.id. St.. 



22 



SAN FEANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 1, 1908. 





S'^^W^M* 



mmm** 



zM%**.. 



'tass 



mm 



mm 



MMWHWBB 



Pierce Great Arrow Cars 



A CONSISTENT RECORD 
FOR A CONSISTENT CAR. 
PIERCE GREAT ARROW CARS 

WINNERS 

IN EVERY GLIDDEN TOUR. 

1905 — Won Glidden Trophy From a Field of 32 Contestants. 

1906 — Defended and Held the Glidden Trophy against a 
Field of 43 Contestants. 

1907 — Four Pierce Great Arrow Cars Made Perfect Scores 
in Glidden Tour and Again, With a Field of 49 Cars, 
Defended and Held the Trophy For the Automobile 
Club of Buffalo. 

1908 — Three Pierce Great Arrow Cars Make Perfect Indi- 
vidual Scores and as a Team Win the Glidden Trophy 
for Buffalo for the Fourth Consecutive Year. 

The Mobile Carriage Company 

Distributors 



762-764 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 



Telephone Franklin 1784 




;■;• ' '. ...•;;V- 




August 1, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



23 



body as will add strength to the movement for Good Roads, and 
For fair legislation, such additional members not to exceed five 
in number. The purpose of these resolutions was to unite the 
Btrength of the three bodies representor] at the convention, in the 
cause "t good roads, fair motor vehicle legislation, ami in thai 

end Dol "iih in prb\ ide for similar convention on larger lines I'oi' 
next year, but also lor the co-operation of other national bodies 
interested in the same subjects. 

* • • 

The Reliability Run held by the Automobile Dealers Associa- 
tion of California, to their Mecca, Del Monte, and the judging 
contest, en Hie one mile track at that place, passed off with great 
success. Although entries were small, enough cars made the 
run under the rules and regulations, to make it interesting. Of 
Hie six ears that started, five made perfect scores. The sixth, a 
Buick, owned and driven by Hugo Erear. was disqualified on ac- 
count of the breaking of a battery coil. Charles S. Howard, 
in bis Buick, won the cup for the speed-guessing contest, on the 
track. Howard made the five miles just four and five-sevenths 
seconds slow of being on the exact time, and as this was the near- 
est guess, the cup was awarded to him. The cars returned at the 
will of their drivers on Sunday, leaving the hotel at all hours, 
some going by way of Santa Cruz, some by way of Chittendon 
Pass, and the others back over the San Juan grade. The next 
event of importance, and which will engross the dealers for sev- 
eral weeks, in preparation, in the big endurance run to Los An- 
geles, to be held on September 9th. 

* * * 

Paraiso is fast obtaining popularity as a rendezvous for the 
automobilist. The roads from Salinas to the springs are in 
splendid condition, and the sports afforded the visitors on their 
arrival cannot be beaten. Swimming, and that splendid sport, 
dove hunting, fishing and all out-door games, are in full swing. 
A ball is given in the large dance hall at the springs every Sat- 
urday night. The patronage is of the very best, and the pro- 
prietor, Mr. H. H. McGowan, is a princely entertainer. 

* * * 

Mr. Warnock, one of the Warnock Brothers, of Salinas, is a 
splendid citizen, and his energy ought to be duplicated by the 
County Board of Supervisors or the Road Commissioners. The 
other day he became incensed at the condition of the road over 
San Juan Hill, and donning his overalls and taking a pick and 
shovel, he started out, and before the day was over had removed 
a great many of the big, jagged rocks and smoothed over many 
of the rough places in the highway. He deserves the thanks of 
all who drive cars, but especially should his action appeal to those 
who are remiss in their duty as regards the repair and mainte- 
nance of roads. 



All that is Best in Motor Car Construction 




V-U 



PACRARD '09 Touring Car 




CADILLAC 

30 horse power, tout cylinder, 5 passenger SI 550.00 




453 Golden Gate Ave 



an rrancisco 



after a dusty ride, and they are appreciated not only by the cot- 
tage and hotel guests, but by the auto transients. The menu at 
the hotel and casino is in charge of an unrivaled chef, and the 
service is excellent. 




Mr. Jack Sbeehan, the buildei of the Hibernia Bank, has pur- 
chased a six-cylinder 1909 Stevens-Duryea, which he intends to 

use between this city and his country home in Rurlingame. 

The L90S Stevens-Duryea owned by Mr. 0. p. Wilson, ar- 
rived at Del Mouie with a perfect score, after making an exceed- 
ingly hard trip from Lake Tahoe. 

Thirteen 1909 Stevens-Durveas have been delivered in San 

Francisco since their arrival a few weeks ago. 

* * * 

The roads in Mai in County are generally fair lo good, and in 
and around San Rafael are in good condition, The auto enthu- 
siasts are making the run from Tiburon to Tomales and re- 
iuvn, via the Rafael Hotel, stopping at the Casino for refresh- 
ments or lunch or dinner. The Rafael grounds are very restful 



Auto Trimming 

Tops, Cushings, and Curtains 

Coverings for seats, tops, lamps, tires, etc. 
We do all kinds of trimmings to order. 

AUTO TOP M'F'G. CO. 

504 Golden Gate Ave., near Larkin, San Francisco 





IB: 

[Affi^E^Xj^^MI ■■■■• ■ ' ■ 

■SIB 












The Imp 
C; 

cannot be over-estii 
engine depends on t 

PAr 

does not char the pi 
clog the spark plugs 

It, is the one pc 

to ask for th 

PACIFIC 

L. 1 

132 Valencia Street 


ortance < 
ylinder O 

nated. The very 
he quality of your 

WARD ( 

ston heads, comb 

rfect- cylinder lubr 

e oil in the cheel 

COAST DISTRIBL 

hi. and B. 1. BI1 


ii Good 
>il 

efficiency of your 
oil. 

OIL 

ustion chambers, or 

icatit. Be sure 
ter-board can. 
ITOR.S : 

San Francisco, Gal. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 1, 1908. 



"Hunting deer in an automobile is great sport," remarked G. 
A. Eastman, coast manager of the White Company yesterday, 
upon his return from Humboldt and Mendocino Counties, where, 
with a party of friends, a week was spent. William Wagner. 
Superintendent of the White Company, was at the wheel nearing 
the Mendocino County border line, when Eastman spied a big 
buck, took aim while sitting in the front seat, and brought down 
his game. 

Tin' first nighfs -top was made at Drury's ranch. The follow- 
ing day the journey was continued, at Eureka, where the motor- 
ists were the guests of T. W. Hine, the wealthy lumberman. Mr, 
lline hail bis Indian rook prepare the venison for dinner, and 
treated the visitors royally. He also accompanied them in his 
own White Steamer, from Eureka to Bryant's Rest. 50 mil-. 




' '. .1. Eastman ni llir wheel of a big White Steamer in the 

ods of Humboldt County. Eastman, who is coast manager 

of the White Company, with >i p> ! a week hunting deer 

in I In' a ni". 

where one of his lumber camps are located. On the return jour- 
ney, the record for tin' trip from Eureka right straight through 
to San Francisco, 293 miles, i- a trifle over twenty hours. The 
White, made the run. including an additional sixty miles !. go- 
ing over to Blue Lakes and Lakeport, in nineteen i rs ami 

thirty-nine minutes. Claude McGee, who went along to "shout" 
pictures as well as deer, was the official time keeper. Oscar 'I'. 
Barber, a well-known attorney of San Francisco, was the fourth 
member of tie 1 party. 

When the roads, the us clifEs and man} sharp turns, 

some curves so abrupt that it was n& i ssa hack up to nego- 
tiate them, are taken into consideration, the time marie is phe- 
nomenal. Numerous heavy grades were also encountered; tic 











"3 




SEW 


Driving a Stevens-Duryea Light Six 

means absolute ease of control and manipulation . You will not he all 
tired out at night even after steering a STEVENS-DURYEA for 100 
or 200 miles a Jay. 

•I Shifting gears, constant alertness and manipulation required in high 
power (over forty horse power) -4-cylinder cars causes strain, exhaustion 
and that "very tired feeling." You forget the pleasures of your ride 
when physically worn out. 

9 Compare the effects, at the end of a day's trip, of a ride in a high 
powered 4-cylinder car, as contrasted with a Stevens-Duryea Light Six. 

fl Stevens-Duryea Cars have an enviable record of achievement be- 
hind them. 

9 Arrange for a demonstration and obtain full particulars from 

PACIFIC MOTOR CAR COMPANY 

3 76-380 Golden Gate Ave. 
Oakland Branch: 1308-10 Franklin Street. 

Manufactured by Stevem-Dur} ea Company, Cbkopeo Fall*. Mill., 1. S. A. 




August 1, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



25 



Eta tlesnake, for instance, oul of Cummings, is twelve miles 
long. The Fraithintl grade is another difficult one to ascend. 

The motorists left Eureka at 5:25 in the afternoon, i le 

Camp Fixe in '.' hours and 3 minutes, Bryant's Rest at 8:30 
p. m., left there at 1:50 the next morning for Dyerville, where 
they had breakfast. Devil'? Elbow, Hubbard's, Harris, Hell's 
Springs and Cummings were left in the rear and a stop made 
at Laytonville tor luncheon. The next places passed through 
were Sherwood, Willits and Calpella, where the regular road 
between San Francisco and Eureka via Ukiah was left, and the 
ear headed for Blue Lakes, where they remained over-night. 
Lakeport was reached early the next morning, then Highlands, 
the Toll Gate at the Summit. Pieta, and then back to the Eureka 
road again, coming through to Sausalitb by way of Cloverdale, 
Healdsburg, Santa Rosa, Petaluma, San Rafael and Sausalito. 

* * * 

"One good turn deserves another" is the prevailing watch-word 
of motorists, and it was put into practice by E. 1*. Mendenhall 
last Monday in Lake County. About eight miles oul of Lake- 
port, Mr. Mendenhall was startled by a sad noise, and investiga- 
tion showed his batteries had petered out. A steam ear over- 
ruled him, and its occupants very kindly loaned three dry cells, 
which had been previously used for lights, and got the little 
Oldsmobile going again. Three miles further on, Mendenhall 
came upon his rescuers, who had gotten into trouble themselves, 
and was able to repay their kindness by towing the big car into 
Lakeport. The Olds made the remainder of the trip to San 
Francisco on the three dry cells. Mr. and Mrs. Cook were guests 

6f Mr. and Mrs. Mendenhall on the trip. 

* * * 

One of the most enjoyable runs made over last Fourth was 
that of Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Erskine, Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
Crowall, and Edward Bullis, in a Thomas Detroit ear. through 
Lake County. Just at this time of the year, this beautiful county 
seems to be at its best, and the number of spring resorts enable 
one to have a good roof over-head wheresoever night overtakes 
bim. The roads average A 1. especially north of Santa Rosa, 
where the real scenery begins. Mr. Erskine's party was absenl 
about four days, the nights being spent at Highlands, Hobergs, 
and Hotel Rafael. Six different springs were visited at easy 
stages, the only real way to fully enjoy the grandeur of the 
"Little Switzerland." Something of a shock was experienced 
when, on looking the car over on its return, it was discovered 
there was not a tool iu the little Detroit which bad faithfully 
answered the throttle during the entire four days in the moun- 
tains. 

* * • 

Herman A. Met/,. Comptroller of the city of New York, ar- 
rived in this city Monday evening, and will spend several days 
here inuring, lie is a delegate to the Convention al Denver, lie 
has arranged through the Pioneer Auto I !o. to be furnished with 

the use of a LUIS Thomas Flyer, while be is in the city, "I' the 

game type as the one be drives in Mew York. Mr. Metz is known 
in the Empire Cit\ as the Champion of Borough System of Con- 
solidation of ('dies, lie has Keen in communication for some 
time with the city ami county authorities of the iia of San 
Francisco, and while here, will meet several of these gentlemen 
for the purpose of advocating i m "f cities about the 

bay. After careful survey of San Prai iround, 

be is of the opinion that it will be of great benefit to the City 

of San Francisco, and still greater to the outlaying hoi' 

'Ibis is what consolidation oi New York has proven, and Mr. 

Mci has a good argument in favor of the cities bore consoli- 
dating. 



TIPS TO AUTOMOBILISTS 



Phone Franki t 

Up-To-Dute Autos 
for hire at all hi 




MAX MAMLOCK 



S70 GOLDEN GATE AVEM E 



SAN FRANCISCO 



PAIX) ALTO — Stanford Auto and Manufacturing Co.. renting repairing 
and sundries. Fire-proof garage. Day and night service. 4-13-9 Emerson 
street. Tel. Main 78. Machine and repair department, 511 Alma street. 

SAN JOSE — Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North First street. The best French 
dinner in California, 76c, or a la carte. Automobile parties given par- 
ticular attention. 

SAN JOSE.— WALLACE BROS'. GARAGE, Market and St. James 
streets. 20,000 square feet of floor space. Special accommodations for 
ladies. Repairing, sundries, renting. Fire proof garage. Day and night 
service. 

SAN JOSE— Stop at LETCHER'S New Garage for first-class service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlor for ladies in connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garage next to corner of First and St. James Sts. 

GILROY, CAL. — George E. Tice, general machinist, expert repairing of 
automobiles and engines a specialty. Day or night service, 260 N Mon- 
terey street. 

SAN JUAN.— WARNOCK BROS. GARAGE. Gasoline, Sundries and 
Repairs. Telephone in case of accidents to Main 13. San Juan. 

SAN JUAN.— Stop at the PLAZA IIOTRL, opposite the OLD MISSION. 
Special attention paid to automobilists. 

SALINAS.— Stop at LOGAN CYCLE CO.'S GARAGE, 320-324 Main St. 
Auto supplies, caps and gloves. Thoroughly equipped for repairing; cars 
for rent. Large stock of all kinds of auto tires. 

PETALUMA. — McNear Garage and Machine Works. Any kind of auto 
repairing. Full line ot auto supplies; complete machine shop. Corner 
Third and C streets. 



VULCANIZING 

Davis Bros. 

INCORPORATED 

TIRES RETREADED AND MADE NEW 
Phons Park 710 970 Golden Gate Ave. 



V ULCANIZIN G 

Stevens &. Elkington Rubber Co. 

Sin Francisco, Cal. 



Phone Franklin 612 

524 Polk St. near Golden Gale Ave. 



Reliance Automobile Co. 

GARAGE, LIVERY AND MACHINE SHOP 



PHONES: 



Park 324 
Park 325 



Fulton and Octavia 



Thorn*, B. Jtfltrj © Compear, 117-125 Yaleoria St., San Pranciaco 



Garage Phone, Market 3337 
(Day) 



Stand Phone, West 7145 
Thompson's Cafe (Night.) 



Thomas Flyers 

FOR HIRE AT ALL HOURS. 

THE ONLY 6-CYLINDER THOMAS. 

Rapid Garage, 1841 Market St. J. E. Neumann, Manager. 



KEENAN BROS. 

Automobile Engineers, Machinists and Blacksmiths. 
273 Valencia Street, San Frandsco. Telephone Market 198S 



We Want, Your Automobile Repair and Machine Work 

The Irvin Machine Works 



335-337 Golden Gate Avenue Phone Market 2366 

San Francisco 



IRVTN SILVERBER.C. 

President, and Manager 



26" 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 1, 1908. 



TAKING A MOTOR CAR TO ENGLAND. 

To lour Europe in one's own automobile — this is the dream of 
many a motor car owner of moderate means, and too often a 
dream which he fears will never be realized. It is, in truth, an 
alluring programme — to go here and there independent of the 
steam trains, making excursions to infrequently visited nooks 
and corners of Great Britain and the Continent, stopping at 
night at some quaint tavern far removed from the bustle and 
ooise of railroad centers, to start early or late as one prefers, 
and to stop where and when one is ready. 

But to-the great majority of motorists the realization of this 
dream seems out of the question because of thoughts of the ex- 
pense involved, while to many others whose way is not wholly 
blocked by the forbidding dollar sigrij there come queries as to 
the best and leasi expensive ways of getting their machines 
across and back. 

Both classes, those who have to count the cosl carefully and 
those who lack information as to the best method of carrying out 
a summer programme of European travel, will be interested in 
the experiences of a man who made the journey. Be was a well- 
to-do but not easy-to-do Scotch-American, thoroughly imbued 
with the idea of getting a hundred cents for every dollar he 
spent, and purposeful not to spend lavishly. 

Deciding to sail from Boston, ho called at the offices of the 
different steamship companies, there to learn what it was nec- 
essary to do to get his car to Liverpool. All advised him to en- 
gage a looker to crate the car and attend to the shipping. But 
a \i-ii to the firm of brokers recommended resulted in the in- 
formation that the charge for crating would he $50, several fees 
for the making of different papers, and an additional amount 
For their services. 

Returning to the steamship companies, he told them he would 
not engage a broker, and asked how he could best handle the 
matter himself. One company said it would take the car un- 
crated, hut at the owner's risk of damage in loading and un- 
loading, while all the others insisted that the ear should he crated 
but said boxing was unnecessary. He finally had a crate built at 
home of one by six inch boards around the ends and sides spaced 
six inches apai t. 

As. in loading, a car is usually placed on the hatch of the 
second deck with no freight around it, the tourist figured that 
the one by six inch boards afforded sufficient protection even 
should freight be stacked near the car. Bolts and lag screws 
only were used in putting the crate together, and the total cost, 
including cartage, was between $25 and $30. 

Before leaving this side, he sought from the Customs House 
the information necessary to enable him to make shipment to 
Liverpool and return so (hat he would avoid trouble in coming 
home. lie was assured that the presentation mi his return of Ids 
outgoing hill of lading would Becure for him the necessary per- 
mission io take possession of his car. He found, however, upon 
In- return that three return Freight blanks were requisite to get- 
ting his car again, and also that a Liverpool Consular Certificate 
was an essential, a bit of information which would have saved 
him much trouble had he possessed it in the ftrsl place. As it 




[Made In York] 

"Not only the best, for the price but. the best, at, any price 

Ask the man who owns one." 

Model H Touring Cor $2050.00 

6-30 Roadster 3900.00 

4-40 Roadster 3150.00 

Model I Touring Car 3400.00 

Immediate delivery San Francisco at, the above prices. 

Repairing in all Branches, Painting and Supplies. Agents 

Supplementary Spiral Springs 

FRANK O. RENSTROM CO. 

424-446 Stanyan St,. Phone Park 476 



was, he had to spend about six hours between the Customs House 
and the Appraiser's office before his car was discharged, and then 
was told thai he had broken the record, as it usually took two 



AUTOMOBILE AND CARRIAGE 
PAINTING, VARNISHING AND 
TRIMMING. Tops and Seat 
Covers made to order. 

LOCOMOBILE REPAIRING. 
Complete line of Locomobile 
parts. Estimates Given on 
all work. 



The Greenland Co., Inc. 

J. MURRAY PAGE, Mgr. 
Phone Market. 1398 287 Valencia St.. 



miles is what, a prominent, business man traveled with his car 
equipped with the 

Sim[5)[&)Il@mm®imttairy Spiral, Sprangs 




He further states that they have 
given him no trouble and have 
saved the Tires, the car in general 
and improved the riding 1 00 per 
cent.. 

We will place a set. on your ma- 
chine and if they do not do all 
that, we claim for them, we will 
refund you the money. 



Frank O. Renstrom Company 



424-446 Stanyan St., San Francisco. 



Phone Park 476 



Installation of Magnetos a specialty. 

GEO. H. WOODWARD 

Automobile Machinist. 




44448 FULTON 
St., San Francisco 



TELEPHONE MARKET 1083 



Washington and East Sts. 



Phone Kearny 678 



Ferry Garage Co. 

cAll Workmanship Guaranteed 

Storage. Renting Supplier. Machinist 



Acgust 1, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



27 



clays t" naeel the various requirements »f the United States cus- 
toms officials. 

The car arrived in Liverpool in good condition. The first 
necessity for motoring in England was a driver's permit, which 
was obtained at the city license department at an expenditure 
of twenty shillings. 

Prom this point on, all was clear sailing. Landing April 18th, 
the American found that the season was not far enough advanced 
for motoring to the best advantage, and advises others to arrive 
in England not earlier than the tenth of May. As to the roads, 
they were as near perfection as can be hoped for in an imperfect 
world. The poorest are as good as our best. There is no necessity 
for keeping watch for ruts, loose stones or other obstructions, 
and even the dust and dirt are scraped up in country as well as 
in city. 

The tour covered about six weeks, from May 7th to June 31st, 
and the itinerary touched Liverpool, Stratford-on-Avon, Oxford, 
London, Dover, Brighton and north to Edinburgh, Glasgow and 
Stirling, with innumerable side trips. A total of 2,453 miles 
was traveled on 138 gallons of gasoline and less than three gal- 
lons of lubricating oil. The price of gasoline averaged twenty- 
six cents a gallon. No adjustment of the carburetter was neces- 
sary for the consumption of the English brand. The lubricating 
oil costs about twenty-five per cent more than on this side. The 
hotel and garage accommodations averaged better than under 
similar conditions in America, and the average charge for din- 
ner, lodging and breakfast for the party of three was $7.50. This 
average applied to all places outside of Liverpool, London, Glas- 
gow and Edinburgh. 

The total expense for repairs on the car for the entire 2,453 
miles was seventy-six cents. The cralc in which the car had 
journeyed eastward across the Atlantic was left in charge of the 
steamship company, and served on the westward passage. 

— James Earl Glauson in Travel Magazine. 



The team of Pierce Great Arrow cars shown in photograph on 
page 28 of this issue won the 1908 Glidden trophy. 



THE PEER OF ALL! 

PLANET OIL COMPANY'S 

TRANSIT AUTOMOBILE OILS 

BASS-HUETER CO. 

816 Mission Street Distributors 

ADAPTED TO EVERY MACHINE 

Friction Costs more than Lubrication 



E. P. Brinegar, President of the Pioneer Auto Co., who re- 
turned from the East Monday night, stopped over at Buffalo 
for two days- to attend the A. A. A. Good Roads and Legislation 
Convention. This is a national affair, ami was attended by dele- 
gates from every State in the Union, .and is the first good roads 
convention that has been attended jointly by horse owners, auto- 
mobilists and the farmers. There were some three or four hun- 
dred delegates, and they, together with friends attending the 
conference, filled Buffalo completely. The automobile clubs and 
citizens of Buffalo gave them several rides through the city. 
Representatives of the press from all over the.country were there, 
and it is the concensus of opinion, from officers of the club and 
others who attended the meeting, that the first real start on the 
subject of good roads has now been made. Committees were 
appointed all over the States to take up different matters, and 
in the future similar meetings will be held annually. 

THE CALIFORNIA EYE. 
is almost constantly Irritated by Wind and Mineral laden Dust. 
Inflammation, Redness, Itching. Burning and Impaired Vision, 
followed by Granulated Eyelids are the Result. 

Murine Eye Remedy gives Reliable Relief. Doesn't Smart ; 
Soothes Eye Pain. Makes Weak Eyes Strong. An Eye Tonic. 
Murine Sold Everywhere at 50c. Ask your Druggist. 



Made for the Man Who Wants the Best 

THE 

SPLIT DOR. F 

1909 High Tension 
Magneto 

With this Magneto on your car you can forget all about 
ignition apparatus — so perfectly and so efficiently does it 
spark your engine. Generates its own current — requires 
no battery, and literally makes the motor run like velvet. 

If you want the best magneto, equip your car with a 
SPL1TDORF. 

Write or call for our 1909 catalogue which fully describes this type of magneto. 




vspiTrrJo^ 



520 Van Ness Ave 



Pacific Coast, Branch 

C. F. SPLITDORF 



San Francisco 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 1, 1908. 




Great Arrow <«rs in Glidden tour entering Harrisburg, Ph.. in the lead with still a perfect score. Teddy Dey leading. 



Safety Device Wins Gold Medal. — Non-Explosive Attachment 
■ for the Gasoline Tank. — Sensational Experiments 
in a Convincing Demonstration. 

For being the "most meritorious invention for safeguarding 
motor vehicles," a gold medal last week was awarded by the 
American Museum of Safety Devices and Industrial Hygiene be- 
fore the Engineers' Club of America, N. Y. City, to the inventor, 
William H. MoXutt, for a device designed to prevent the explo- 
sion of gasoline, and one which holds great interest for automo- 
hilists. The invention is manufactured at Newport, New York, 
ami a branch store has been opened at 625 Golden Gate avenue, 
San Francisco, California, where a demonstration can be seen at 
any time during the day, through the courtesy of Messrs. 

Shortell & McKenna, Pacific Coast agents. 

* * * 

L. J. Sehuman, president of Lake County Automobile Trans- 
portation Co., is in San Francisco, and in speaking of the work 
ill tin- Thomas Flyer on the 6tage line, states that their seven- 
passenger ear 1ms been utilized more as a carryall than as an 

.■ml iliile. ill their efforts to transport passengers from l'ieta 

to Lakeport and Highland Springs. On numerous occasions, the 
machine has carried from ten to twelve passengers up the one 
mile Pieta grade. Mr. Sehuman states that the Thomas is prov- 
ing so satisfactory on mountain work that the company is going 
to change all its curs to Thomas Flyers, and next season they 
will probably add four new machines to the service. Many times 
this Thomas stage has been obliged to transport passengers from 
low-powered ears aver this grade, owing to the inability of the 
small machines to negotiate the hills with their passengers 

aboard. 

* * * 

Mrs. Leslie Carter, the well-known actress, had delivered to 
her in New York on July 1st what is conceded to be the hand- 
somest automobile ever seen in Mew York. The body is of 
special design, and made in accordance with Mrs. Carter's own 
ideas. The color is canary with leather to match. The entire 
ear was buill by the E. R. Thomas Motor Co., of Buffalo, and 
is a 1909 six-cylinder type. Wherever the ear stops, the streets 
are soon crowded with people. 

* * * 

Mark Requa, who has been touring in the East, has returned 
to Oakland with his six-cylinder Thomas Flyer. This beautiful 
machine may be seen almost any day reeling off the kilometers 
between Mr. Requa's residence and the business district. It is 
said he often takes a run down to San .lose for a light for his 
cigar, remarking, "Back in a few minutes." 




The "Show Me" Car 



Has Shown You 



Perfect Scores 

For both our entries in the 
twenty-four-hour endurance run 



RUNABOUT 
AND TOURING CAR 



OSEN & HUNTER 

407 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 



IGNITION an< ^ at ' e5s expense and inconven- 
TRMIRI F^ ience to you than at present. Rent 
I nUUDLti your batter ies -from AUTO IGNITION CO. 
AVOIDED 709-711 Octavia St., Phone Market 5678. 



August l, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



That 1908 will mark the close of the yearly model idea is be- 
coming more than ever apparent, as specifications come from 
the various factories. E. V. Brinegar, manager of the Pioneer 
Auto Co. states that Hie Olds factory have been so well pleased 
in the showing of their 1908 ears (hat the next year will see little, 
if any, change, ami owing to this Eact, they will continue making 
their model M Eour-cylinder and model Z six-cylinder practically 
to (lie first of the year. 

* * * 

Copy of letter received by Mr. B. P. Brinegar, manager of 
Pioneer Auto Co.. from Ralph Blass, chauffeur for Charles Stet- 
son Wheeler, of this city, who, with his family, is touring Europe 
at the present time. 

London, June 28, 1908. 
Mr;. Brinegak — Dear Sir: 

Dropping these few lines to tell you of the good work our big 
six is doing. Up to the present date, all I have had to do is to 
give it the gas and oil. Under our conditions, it is marvelous 
work carrying ten people always, going from 150 to 300 miles 
a day, and best of all, no wear on our tires to talk about. People 
of the United States think there are no hills over here, but they 
are mistaken, hut our 70, or as I call it, 900 h. p., eats them up 
alive. Our car is the largest touring car in London. Went to 
Ascot the other day, when there were thousands of cars on the 
road, and they all got our dust. They don't know what to make 
of it. 

We Americans have now got the foreigner skinned in making 
autos, and any man who buys one of these foreign makes is a 
fool. All that can be. said is that their appointments are better. 
Visited several American factories on my way Bast, and now 
have gone through several here, and there is no reason in the 
world why we should not be supreme. Our machinery is one 
thousand per cent better, our men are by far the better. Simply 
no comparison. 

One other thing I want to tell. I got my car up to 68 miles 
an hour wilh nine people in, glass front up, top down. Great 
work. Also can go through these crowded streets, and no one 
knows how crowded I hey are until they get here, on my high 
speed. 

Yours truly, 

Ralph Blass. 



V k 



" ^fhose 
[ustrousfyps 



are 




'ftP//V£, 



EYE 

EEMEBY 

A Favorite Toilet Accessory 

Has won many Friends as an 
Aid to the Restoration of Normal 
Conditions. Healthful Tone and 
Natural Brilliancy to 

v . Eyes that Need Care. 

It has proven of great value 
' l the Home as 

An Eye Tonic 
for Weat. Red, Inflamed 
& Itching Eyes & Eyelids. 

w As An Eye Insurance 

\ Tourists, Automohi lists 
/ and others exposed to 
Strong Winds. Dust 
and Reflected Sunlight, 
which produce Irrita- 
tion .Granulation. Ulcer, 
ation and Weak Eyes, 
■will find in Murine a 
Safe. Soothing Eye Lo- 
tion affording 

" Reliable Relief." 
The Finishing Touch, 
Bewitchingly Costumed The "Finishing Touch*" 

In Costliest Gown, To the Toilet ia seen 

For the Social Event, In the Act above Pictured 

At the South End of Town. "Two drops" of Murine, 

Try Murine for the "Automobile Eye 



^ 



Humanitarians will he interested in the article on "The 

Tragedy of the Yaqui," in the August Overland Monthly. All 
hews-stands, all trains and ferries. August number! Ask for it. 



Bosch Magnetos and Parks 

Our Repairing Guaranteed 



PACIFIC AUTOMOBILE EXCHANGE 
465 Golden Gate Ave. 



San Francitco 




Stoddard-Dagton can competing for Houer Trophy in Glidden tour, 1908. 
(,'.' /'. Moor*, J. F. Rankle. Let Dyktman. 

:09—A. O. Miller. Carl Wright. John Harcomb. Picture taken at Harrusburg, Pa. 



30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 1, 1908. 



No owner of a building can afford to neglect insuring his 
property against fire, and likewise, but in a larger sense, no owner 
of an automobile is economical in habit or far-seeing who does 
not cover his cars by one of the policies of the Insurance Com- 
pany of North America. Bailey & Johnston are the General 
Agents for California, and their address is 102 Battery street. 
In addition to the loss by fire, there is a clause that provides 
for loss by collision. Inevery respect, this policy is a most lib- 
eral one, and as we have stated, it is a very unwise owner of a 

car who does not investigate its merits. 

* * * 

Dudley Heron, Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Heron, E. A. Heron, Jr., 

and Miss Elinor Parker, were among those who motored from 
Oakland to Del Monte last week. 

* * * 

Prom Haywards, to Del Monte, went a jolly party of motorists 
which comprised Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Russell, Miss Russell; Miss 

Winton and C. S. Long. 

* * * 

The Pioneer Auto Co. report tKe sale of an "M" Oldsmobile 
to I Hyde < larman of Alameda. 

* * * 

S. 6. Chapman, President of the Consolidated Motor Car Co., 
ed a telegram from the Franklin factory, advising that the 
six-cylinder Franklin and big four-cylinder Franklin car made 
perfect scores in the Glidden tour. The other six-cylinder Frank- 
lin and the runabout were penalized once for breaking a Bpring, 
which was caused by driving too rapidly over the water-breaks 
in the Alleghany Mountains. The seals on the spare parts bag 
were unbroken. 

* * * 

The Frank 0. Renstrom Co. reports the sale of a 10 h. p. Pull- 
man roadster to Charles F. Holman of Stockton. 

* * * 

The Delineation of Del Monte Doings. 

The road between San Francisco and Del Monte was alive 
with automobiles last Saturday, a large number of people having 
gone down to the latter place to witness the reliability contest of 
the Automobile Dealers' Association, the finish of which took 
place in the Del Monte track. 

Among those who motored there on that day were Mr. and 
Mrs. P. A. Brassy, of Los Angeles, accompanied by Mrs. Mary 
L. Gordon and William W. Gordon, of San Jose; Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert E. Reid, Mrs. L. F. Gunner and Mrs. C. J. Church, of 
San Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. Hugo P. Frear and Miss Frear 
of Burlingame; Nathan Tibbitts, Pierre Moore, Clarence Eng- 
lish, Harold English. L. Sawver, Jr., D. J. Sinclair, C. V. Ben- 
nett, Frank E. Carroll, John "H. S. Schubber. C. S. Howard, H. 
C. Keyes, L. A. Washburne and Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Barnett, 
all of whom motored from San Francisco. 



No More Explosions, Loss of Life or Property! 

Caused by naphtha, gasoline, benzine, etc.: it can be prevented 
Without the use of chemicals and safely handled, poured, trans- 
ported or stored in quantities under all conditions of hazard by 
OUR NON-EXPLOSIVE SAFETY DEVICES for CONTAINERS 
and TANKS. 

THE McNUTT PATENT DEVICES. 

Demonstrated by the severest and most rigid tests before the 
highest expert and official authorities. The only positive and prac- 
tical protection in the use of gasoline, naphtha, benzine or any 
other volatile liquid, wherever and whenever used: the city home, 
the country villa, cottage or farm house, the hotel, hospital or 
sanitarium or for power or illumination, for MOTOR BOATS or 
MOTOR VEHICLES, the NAPHTHA LAUNCH, the YACHT, or the 
AUTOMOBILE, whether In cans or tanks, en route, stored or in 
garage. 

The McNutt mechanical devices are simple, are readily under- 
stood and assure the user thereof of absolute safety under all 
existing conditions from explosions and consequent dangers arising 
therefrom. 

The annual losses in dollars and cents throughout the country 
:is a result of explosions from GASOLINE, NAPHTHA and all 
dangerous liquids is simply enormous in the aggregate, and what 
la more deplorable, is the constant sacrifice of precious human lives 
on the alter of ignorance, greed and uncalled for recklessness; our 
devices eliminate these dangers in all cases. 

Wherever and whenever GASOLINE or other highly inflam- 
mable liquids are used, producing spontaneous combustion, the 
McNutt Safety Device comes as a veritable God-send of protection. 

PROTECTION AND SAFETY. CHEAPER THAN RISK OR LOSS. 

Full description, illustration and all needed information of each 
device sent upon application. 

The Non-Explosive Safety Napthi Container Co., 

SHORTBLL 8 McKENNA, Agents 
625 Golden Gate Are., San Francisco, Gal. Telephone Park 1754 



Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Thirl of Redwood City, who are enthusi- 
astic motorists, having been among the first in California to take 
to automobiling as a pastime, were at Del Monte for several 
days recently. 



"THE LITTLE STEERSMAN" 

OUR AUTOMATIC STEERING AND SAFETY DEVICE 

SimpU t>at 
powerfully 

,CtlT. jj W/ """"■ 

pending 

Insures your safety and your car. Holds the car steady when you 
lose control. Assists the driver at all times. Price S10.00. 

TiTc ABRAMS-MASON CO., Sole Manufacturers, 
Chatham, N. Y. 

CEO. H. WOODWARD, Agent,, 444-448 Fulton St. 
San Francisco 




It Pays to Know the AUTOCAR 




Winner of the 

50 Mile Race 

, free for all cars at Philadelphia 
June 13th, '08 



MODEL XIV ROADSTER 



Walter C. oMorris 

WESTERN DISTRIBUTOR 

640 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco 






August 1, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



BANKING 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 



With which are amalgamated the Bank of British Columbia, the Halifax 
Banking Co. and the Merchants' Bank of Prince Edward Island 
HEAD OFFICE — TORONTO. 

Paid-up Capital $10,000,000 Reserve Fund $5,000,000 

Aggregate Resources, over $113,000,000. 

B. E. WALKER. President ALEX. LAIRD. General Manager. 

LONDON OFFICE— 2 Lombard St., E. C. 

NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. 

BRANCHES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA— Atlin. Cranbrook. Fernle, 
Greenwood, Kamloops, Ladysmlth, Nanatmo, Nelson. New Westminster, 
Pentlcton, Prince Rupert, Princeton, Vancouver (3), and Victoria. 

YUKON TERRITORY— Dawson and White Horse. 

UNITED STATES— Portland. Seattle and Skagway (Alaska). 

OTHER BRANCHES— Alberta, 26; Saskatchewan, 18; Manitoba, 20; 
Ontario and Quebec, 62; Maritime Provinces, 19. 

BANKERS IN LONDON— The Bank of England, The Bank of Scot- 
land, Lloyd's Bank, Ltd., The Union of London, and Smith's Bank, Ltd. 

AGENTS IN CHICAGO— The First National Bank. 

AGENTS IN NEW ORLEANS— The Commercial National Bank. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Main Office, 326 California St. Branch— Cor. Van 
NesB and Eddy. 
A. KAINS, Manager. BWUCE HEATHCOTE, Asst. Manager. 



Security Savings Bank 



316 MONTGOMERY STREET. 
Sun Francisco, Cal. 



Authorized Capital - 



$1,000,000.00 



PAID UP CAPITAL $600,000.00 

SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS 332,000.00 



DIRECTORS: WM. BABCOCK. S. L. ABBOT, O. D. BALDWIN, 
JOSEPH D. GRANT, E. J. McCUTCHEN, L. F. MONTEAGLE, 
R. H. PEASE, WARREN D. CLARK, JAMES L. FLOOD, FRED 
W. RAY, J. A. DONOHOE, JACOB STERN. 



The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 



E. C. 



Head Office — 18 Austin Friars, London, 
Capital Authorized, $6,000,000. Paid-up, $1,600,000 

Subscribed, $3,000,000 Reserve Fund. $700,000 

This bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout 
the world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells ex- 
change and bullion. 
IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LILIENTHAL, Managers. 

J. FRIEDLANDER. Cashier. 



London, Paris and American Bank, Ltd. 



N. W. Cor. Sansome and Salter Streets. 
Subscribed Capital, $2,600,000. Paid-up Capital, $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $1,200,000. 
Head Office — 40 Threadneedle St.. London. E. C. 
AGENTS — New York — Agency of the London. Paris and American 
Bank, Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y.; Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres 
& Cle. 17 Boulevard Polssonler. Draw direct on the principal cities of 
the world. Commercial and Travelers' credits issued. 
S. GREENEBAUM, H. FLE1SHHACKER, Managers. 

R. ALTSCHUL. Cashier. 



Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

Building at 706 Market Street. Opposite Third. 
Guaranteed Capital. $1,000,000. Paid-up capital and surplus. $620,000 

James D. Fhelan. President; John A. Hooper. First Vice-President. 
James K. Moffltt, Second Vice President; George A. Story, Cashier; C. 
B. Hobson, Assistant Cashier; A. E. Curtis. Second Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS — James D. Phelan. John A. Hooper. J. K. Moffltt. Frank 
J. Sullivan, Rudolph Spreckels. R. D. McElroy. Charles Holbrook, J. C. 
McKlnstry. Rolla V. Watt 

This bank does a savings business exclusively, paying Interest on all 
deposits. One dollar will open an account, and remittances can be sent 
by Express, Post-Offlce order or check. Write for particulars. 

Hours — 10 to 3 p. in.; Saturdays. 10 to 12 m.; Saturday evenings, for de- 
posits only. 6:30 to 8 p. m. 

The German Savings & Loan Society 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up In cash 1.000.000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds l.<" 

Deposits. June 30. 1908 M.474,654.23 

Total Assets 37.055,263.31 

Remittances may |M made by draft, post-office, or Wells, Fargo ft 
Co.'s money orders, or coin by ex] 

Office Hours — 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock p. m.. except Saturdays to 
12 o'clot k M. and Saturday evenings from 7 o'clock p. m. to 8 o'clock 
p. m. for receipt of deposits only. 

OFFICERS— rresldent. N, Oh land t; First Vice- President. Daniel 
sldent, F.mil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; 
"t Cashier. William Herrmann; Secretary, George. Tourny: 
Assistant Secretary. A. H. Ifuller; Oloodfellow & Eells. General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS- -N. Ohlandt. Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte. 
Ign. Steinhart. I N. Walter. J. W. Van Bergen. F. Tlllmann. Jr.. E. T. 
Kruse and W. S. Goodfellow. 



FIRE MARINE AUTOMOBILE 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 



CAPITAL, $1,600,000 



ASSETS, $6,000,000 



CALIFORNIA AND SANSOME STREETS 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Cash Capital, $200,000. 



Cash Assets, $631,377.19 



Pacific Coast Gasualty Co. 

OP CALIFORNIA. 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, Elevators, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Burglary, Plate Glass Insurance. 

Officers — Edmund P. Green, "President; John C. Coleman, Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; F. P. Deering, 
Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, H. E. Bothln, Edward L. Brayion, John C. Cole- 
man, F. P. Deering, E. F. Green, James K. Moffltt, Henry Rosenfeld, 
Adolph A. Son, William S. Tevls. 

Head Office — Merchants Exchange Building, San Francisco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company, General Agents for California, Kohl Building, San 
Francisco. 

The Connecticut Fire Insurance Go. 

Of Hartford. Established 18(0. 

Capital 11.000,000.0(1 

Total Assets I,721,4»3.0t 

Surplus to Policyholders 2,282,136.00 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL BUILDING 
BENJAMIN J. SMITH, MANAGER. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co., Ltd. 

Of Liverpool. 
Capital |«, 700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agon's 
3 ao SANSOME STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

ANNUAL MEETING 
The Risdcm Iron and Locomotive Works 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works for 
t lie election of trustees for the ensuing year and the transaction of such other business 
as may be brought before the meeting, will be held at the office of the company. 208 
Steuart St., San Francisco, on MONDAY, the 3d dav of August. 1908, at 11 o'clock a. m. 

HARRY D. ROGERS. Seen 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Savage Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Evocation of principal place of business, San Francisco, California. 
Location <>f works, Virginia city, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given that :it a meeting of the Board of Directors, 
hold on the 32d day of July. 1908. an assessment (No. 12) of t> p >\* < 
cents per share was levied upon the capita] stock of the corporation, 
payable Immediately In United States gold com, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the company, room 116, No. 339 Bush stnet. San Francisco. 
California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 

87TH DAY OF AUGUST, 1 
will be delinquent and advertise..] for sale ;<t public auction, and aniens 
payment is made before, will be sold on FRIDAY, the I8U1 day of Sep- 
tember, 1908, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost Of 
advertkdng and expenses °f sale. 
By order of the Board of Directors. 

JOHN w. twiggs. Secretary. 
< »fnce — Room 116, 339 Bush street. San Francisco, California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Utah Mining Company. 
Location of principal place of business. Ban Francisco, California 
tion of works. Virginia Mining District, Stores County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 8th day of July, 1908. an assessment (No. 7i of Ui 
I" r share, was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, | 
immediately in United States go],] coin, to the secretary, at the office of 
the company, room 117. 330 Bush street. San Francisco. California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
18TH DAY OF AUGUST, 1908, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment Is n will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 20th day of 

s. pterober, L908, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the 
st of advertising and expenses of sale. 
By order of the Board of Directors. 

A. W. HAVENS. Secretary. 
Office — Room 117, 339 Bush street, San Francisco, California. 



Central Trust Company of California 

42 Montgomery St. Branches: 3039 16th St.; 624 Van Ness Avenue. 

Accounts of Individuals. Firms, Corporations. Unions, Societies 
solicited. Interest paid on Savings Accounts. Drafts sold on all 
parts of the world. 

Capital paid In, $1,600,000 Resources. $5,025,939.09 

B. G. TOGNAZZI. Manager. 



32 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 1, 1008. 





New 
Poodle 
3EL Dog 

Restaurant 
and 

|¥ 1 N. W. Corner 

n ° tel Polk 8 Post Sts. 

Phone S«D Francisco 

Franklin 2960 



Thompson's 
Annex 



SERVE AN 
IDEAL 



40c 



LUNCHEON 
O'Farrell near Fillmore 



Old Poodle Dog Restaurant 

824-826 Eddy St., near Van Ness Ave. Formerly at Buih St., 
cor. Grant Avenue. Phone Franklin 63. 



The Majestic— A 
Homelike Hotel 

Refined surroundings, the very best cuisine, perfect service, moderate 
prices. Rates on application. N. W Corner Sutter and Gough. 



Matchless 
Del Monte 



For week-end trips or longer vacations. 

Summer Rates $3.00 to $5.50 per day American plan. 

Del Monte Express with through Parlor car leaves jrd and Townsend daily at 
three arriving In time for dinner. 

Reduced railroad rates for week-ends. 

Write for reservations today. 

H. R. W A R N E R , Manager. 



Hotel St*. James 



OPPOSITE ST. JAMES PARK 

SAN JOSE 

Recognized headquarters for automobile parties. 

ALBERT BETTENS. Prop. R. M. BETTENS. Mar. 



Hotel Westminster 



Los Angeles. Cal. 

Fourth and Main St-.. 



American Plan 

REOPENED 

Rates Per Day, $2.50 Rooms without Bath 
Rooms with Bath $3.00, $3.50 and $4.00 

European Plan 

SI. 00 per day and up 
With bath SI. SO an up 

F. O. JOHNSON, Proprietor 



HOTEL EMPIRE 

BROADWAY AND 63d STREET 
(Lincoln Square) - 

NEW YORK CITY 

A FAMILY and TRANSIENT HOTEL 
jf the Best Class 

IN THE VERY CENTER OF EVERYTHING 
WORTH WHILE 

CAFE and RESTAURANT NOTED for excellent cooking, efficient service and 
moderate prices. 

Rooms with detached bath Si. 50 per day and up. 

Rooms with private bath 2.00 

Parlor, bedroom and bath j.50 

Send for Free GUIDE TO NEW YORK. 

W. JOHNSON QUINN, Proprietor. 




GILROY HOT SPRINGS 

OPEN THE YEAR ROUND. 

ACCESSIBILITY. — The keynote to our success. Only 4 hours 
from San Francisco, Including delightful stage ride over the best 
kept mountain road In California. Unsurpassed table, superb ser- 
vice, health-healing waters, telephone, post-office, Ideal climate. 

The waters contain sulphur, alum. Iron, soda, magnesia, iodine 
and traces of arsenic," and are very efficacious In cures of rheuma- 
tism, neuralgia, rheumatic gout, kidney and liver diseases, lead 
and mercurial poisoning, and all bladder and urinary complaints. 
Hunting and trout fishing. Rates $12 to $17.50 a week; baths free. 
Trains leave Third and Townsend streets at 9 a. m. Direct stage 
connection. Send for booklet or see Peck-Judah, 789 Market St. 

W. J. McDONALD, Proprietor. 



spend you* pj zmo Beach The Finest Beach 



SUMMER AT 



on the Coast, 



"NOT AN IDLE MINUTE." 
Hold your conventions and club outings at Pizmo! 
You can live at the Inn for $2.50 per day. Special weekly and 
monthly rates. 
Elegantly furnished Tents In Tent-city for $6.00 per week for two. 

Fishing, Boating, Bathing, Autolng, Bowling, Tennis, Horseback 
Riding through the mountains; Clam Digging. 

Two large bathing pavilions, with warm plunge. 

The beach at Pizmo is one-quarter of a mile wide, and seventeen 
miles long. And Is noted among the autoists as the Ormond of the 
West. 

Ask any Southern Pacific agent about summer excursion rates, 
or write Pizmo Beach Resort, 739 Market street.. 



Anderson Springs 



Lake County, 

California 



The greatest resort for health and pleasure; the only natural 
mineral steam baths In Lake County. Natural Hot Sulphur and 
Iron Baths. Board — $10 to $14 per week. No extra charge for 
baths. How to reach the Springs — Take Oakland ferry at 7:30 
a. m., or Steamer Montlcello, and Napa Valley Electric R. R. to 
St. Helena, auto stage to springs, fare $6.55. arrive 12.30 for lunch, 
or S. P. train to Callstoga, arrive 11.30 for lunch; Spiers stage to 
springs; fare $6.80; arrive at Anderson Springs at 4 p. m., distance 
21 miles. Fare, $7 round trip from San Francisco. Address all 
communications to J. ANDERSON, Anderson Springs, Mlddletown, 
Lake County, Cal. 




s*n f^uei 




(£%iiftttvix&%b i otxtx&tT~ 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 
The News Letter l» a member California Periodical Publishers' Association. 



VOL. LXXVI 



San Francisco, CaL, Saturday, August 8, 1908 



No. 6 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER Is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 773 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Temporary 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal . Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London office — 30 Cornhill, E, C. England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication in 
the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 



Mr. Roosevelt is reported as bent on carrying the war into 

Africa. 

What has become of the Bulletin's anti-race-track cru- 
sade? 

The Directoire is on the wane, and it is to be a short skirt 

and tights next, or trunks. 

None of the political parlies have, as far as we know, 

introduced a simplified spilling plank. 

There is some talk of the Dutch calling the Swiss navy 

to their aiil in quelling the sneering Castro. 

Hisgen is the proxy for Hearst, and the Socialists arc 

looking for a proxy for their candidate, who is in jail. 

Mr. Ttooscvelt will go out of. office as the most popular 

man ever in the Presidential chair, except Washington. 

Every time thai Castro puts a spoke in the wheels of the 

grabbing asphalt trusts, he helps California just that much. 

The farcical monkeying with Ruef, instead of giving him 

short shrift, is the besl indication of the fact that the prosecution 
is not and never was in earnest. 

Mr. Gompers respectively suggests that Mr. Hearst ami 

his daily writers handle Hie truth in a most careless manner. 
Mr. Qomper has not made a new discovery. 

It. is said (hat the Mikado has sen! his congratulations to 

Mr. Bryan. Wonder if Bome of Mr. Hearst's celestials have aenl 
the Dowager Empress's congratulations to Hisgen? 

Mr. Hughes has not dropped the fighl against the race 

track gamblers and makers of criminals in the Empire State. 

lie is going to piil Bome of them in the penitentiary. 

A kinsman of Hie Prince Zu Bulenberg is in trouble in 

Berlin, accused id' the theft of a gem. He needn't worry. lie 
is quite respectable alongside of his celebrated names 

Why doesn't the virtuous Mr. SpreckeU use the "power- 
ful influence" of the Call to kill the rare track? is it beeau - 
he believes the making of criminals by the wholesale is 
thing? 

hidge Groscup, like all very homely men. is fond 

lime-light. He is getting rather more of it than is comfo 
and is crying aloud for his fellow citizens to ki 

to themselves. 

Mr. Wulliam Randolph V here. He came in a 

private car. He, it is suspected, is come secretly to 

two Chinese members into a dependent league association. The 

Dependents are growing. 

The Democrats of Pennsylvania roundly denounce the 

unseating of the fiery Ouffey and enthusiastically approve of the 
nomination of the Peerless Bill. Something wrong here and 
one has a knife up his sleeve, and we are not -tire it isn t 
Guffey. 



If the prosperity wave goes on without recession it will 

soon be so overwhelming that the Democrats and the other calam- 
ity howlers will be utterly bereft of speech. No material to build 
theories upon! 

There is doubt expressed as to Elinor Glyn's ability to 

enact the part as naturally as she wrote it. The great difficulty 
will be in finding a young man so unsophisticated as to appreciate 
her rather mature charms. Red hair does not always denote 

passion. 

Mr. Fairbanks has been a most efficient officer of the Gov- 
ernment, and he goes out of office with the love of every one that 
has ever had anything to do with him. The stories of coldness 
and austerity that have been given out by the newspapers arc 
carelessly cruel calumnies on a good man. 

The next Legislature of California must doom the rare 

track. Every prospective candidate for the House or the Senate 
should he quizzed as to his standing, and if he is not in favor of 
laws against gambling in pools at the track or elsewhere, he 
should be cold-shouldered into private life. The track must go! 

President Castro arranged to send the Dutch warships 

into quarantine when they arrived oil' the Venezuelan coast, and 
the Gelderland turned tail and ran. Quarantine is quite as 
effective as guns. If the Bussians had thought of it. Port Arthur 
might have been saved. 

Mr. Roosevelt has heard the still, small voice of protest 

from the independent section of the American press, and he has 
Saved himself from making any further mistakes in the Castro 
ease. This country is in no clean business when it appears as a 

tiad debt collector for parties whose claims have been looked into 

and thrown out of court. 

The original Taft man is slid holding down his job in the 

White House, ami he will hold it until he steps out of the door 
and hands the key to the next President. The fact that lie i- gOf 
ing to leave the job to a man of his own selection is not going to 
prevent his filling every minute of his incumbency with strenu- 
ous labors. 

While some carping i icts to the "side chops" on 

^^r. Sherman's physiognomy, e host of others object to Kern's 
microhe breeding door mat. 1 1 

were nominated to placate the Populists, and that his personality 

was selected to curry favor with the gambli 
A queer combination to gold-brick the public. 

Last week we asked "who is the Itean of West- 
minster':'" He is the chap who refused to allow the placing of 

a tablet in the Abb e the life and the woi 

Spencer. This should he enough to make him infamous for all 
lime with English-speaking people. His name is unimportant, 

except knowing it may save his predecessor and his so 

from shame. 

Any one that acecp- tired stories of Taffe 

serviency ' and his abject following out of orders 

from the great Hough Rider, will have another guess coming. 
Taft has a mind of hi- own. and. like his body, it's a large our. 
He doesn't carry a brass band in each pocket, and he will not 
approach a critical situation with a baring of teeth and a beating 
of cymbals. (Hie way max as the other, but we 

. lined to believe, with all kinds of reaped for the President, that 

- way is better. The country will have a chani 
once he is elected, as he surely will be. 



?— * c _ _ n _ _ n _ . y : . i 5 X -T> 


EDITORIAL 


COMMENT! 


tri ' i i 




MR. HENEY'S FEE AND HIS PEONS RCDOLPB SPRECKEL'S BOSS-SHIP 
JIM SMITH TO BE A FEDERAL JUDGE 



MjA 



Mr. "Rudolph Spreckels, as supreme 
The "Rise of potentate of (lie Lincoln-Roosevelt 

Boss Rudolph. League, has climbed the la'dder of 

boss-ship with unprecedented rapid- 
ity. 1 1 is only a few months ago that bis flattering biographer, 
Mr. Lincoln Steffens, admitted that Mr. Spreckels had always 
despised politics — so much so. indeed, thai he had never even 
taken the trouble to discharge the most ordinary functions "t citi- 
zenship, but had carefully kept away from the contamination 
of the polling booth. Nevertheless, Mr, Steffens. who is credited 
with considerable experience in the atudy of bosses, found all the 
instincts of the boss in his hero's character. Rudolph Spreckels 
would brook no dictation. He bad quarreled with and reviled 
bis own father in order to "get ahead" of him. Business asso- 
ciations with other men bad been found impossible unless Bu- 
dolph's assoi iates were willing to subordinate themselves abso- 
Lutely to bis arrogant will. He must have his own way or none 
at all. The same peculiar characteristics that have marked Mr. 
Spreckels's career in business at once asserted themselves in the 
graft prosecution, and in his subsequent plunge into politics. 
AVith his own ends in view. Mr. Spreckels determined to invest 
in the graft prosecution. To achieve those ends, he demanded 
undisputed sway. The graft prosecution promptly became a 
privately financed and privately directed affair. Mr. Spreckels 
took upon himself the extraordinary function of dictating who 
should be prosecuted and who should go free — the latter for ser- 
vices rendered to Mr. Spreckels. A more impudent usurpation 
of authority has never been chronicled in American history. 
But the people of San Francisco, deluded by the magnificent 
claims made for Mr. Spreckels's splendid patriotism and com- 
plete disinterestedness, tolerated the usurpation with wonderful 
grace. Drastic measures were imperative to terminate the Ruef- 
Schmitz disgrace, and Rudolph Spreckels was hailed as the god 
in the machine. For some months the entire municipality was 
under Rudolph's thumb. San Francisco became a Spreckels 
principality. lie rewarded the public confidence — or negligence 
— by elevating in turn two of his disgraceful creatures, Gallagher 
and Boston, to the Mayor's chair. Meanwhile, the whole course 
of (lie public prosecution was rendered absolutely subservient to 
Mr. Spreckels's personal desires and private designs. After 
nearly two years, the nel result of Mr. Spreckels's domination of 
the District Attorney's office — ignoring for the moment all the 
scandalous intrigues that the Spreckels tools, Heney and Burns, 
precipitated — is besf summed up in the famous conundrum pro- 
pounded by Mr. A. Mutt: "What is the difference between an in- 
dictment and a conviction?" The answer to which was: "About 
$300,00(1 of Mr. Spreckels's money." 



With his innate appetite for power 
The Spreckels- whetted by the authority which his 

L.-B. League. personal control of the Prosecution 

had given him, and also realizing 
that the Prosecution was on its last legs and could only be bol- 
stered up through the medium of politics, Mr. Spreckels took a 
plunge into the whirlpool ho had so loathed. He was the real 
founder of the Lincoln-Roosevelt League. He sent Heney over 
to Oakland to dictate his principal's views at the League's birth 
and christening. The Spreckels purse-strings were only to be 
loosened if Spreckels had his way. The Spreckels purse was in- 
dispensible for such a campaign. The bargain was struck. Mr. 
Spreckels would pay the way. but Mr. Spreckels must have his 
own way. For some time Mr. Spreckels was content to remain in 
the background. With delightful modesty and with more dis- 
cretion, he refused the United States Senatorship offered to him 
at one of the League's luncheons. It was more advantageous — 



for his own purposes — to continue in the role of the self-sacri- 
ficing and totally disinterested patriot. "Citizen" Spreckels. 
who had never taken the trouble to vote until his own designs got 
mired in politics, was therefore modestly enrolled in the rank 
and file of the League in its great task of rescuing the State from 
the domination of the bosses. 



But "Citizen" Spreckels has not 
Tin: Ism t. is SpbeoKELS. permitted his light to remain under 

a bushel. His secret dictatorship 
was so absolute that concealment was no longer possible. The 
Lincoln-Roosevelt League publicly proclaimed him boss by sup- 
planting it- executive committee with a new idea in reform 
politics— assuring popular representation — in the appointment 
of an "Administration Committee." of which "Citizen" Spreck- 
els should be administrator. The new boss has assumed a suprem- 
acy never dreamed of in other political organizations. No dele- 
gate Can be appointed until he has been approved by "Citizen" 

Spreckels. The victory of the Spreckels-Lincobi-Roosevelt 
League at next Tuesday's primaries would mean that Mr. Ru- 
dolph Spreckels had pocketed the Republican party in Califor- 
nia, and was prepared to assume as absolute a dictatorship over 
the political destinies of the State as be had bought and paid for 
in the graft prosecution, in the mastery of his "good dogs" and 
in his domination of the League. Mr. Spreckels's dream of 
political dictatorship is probably an idle one. for all indications 
point to his disappointment next Tuesday. But it is well that 
no vuler be deluded by the League's pretentious standards and 
high-sounding protestations of "reform." If, as has been loudly 
claimed, the League mainly consists of independent voters who 
desire to see the people wrest political control from the bosses, 
the\ should realize what wide difference there is between the 
League's promise and performance, A vote at the primaries Eor 
the League's delegates means a vote for the enthronement of 
Rudolph Spreckels as the political dictator of California. That 
is the real issue which voters have to face next Tuesday. 



Unclean. 



The gn at investigator himself is at 
. last being investigated. The pro- 
ceedings are not pleasant. It has 
heei, demonstrated that Heney accepted $42,500 in the shape of 
the familiar "legal fee" from a public utility corporation, to 
which he had rendered actual services as an attorney of the most 
insignificant and totally inadequate proportions. Mr. Heney's 
sole response to the straightforward, however disconcerting ques- 
tion, as to the nature of the services he rendered the Contra 

( losta W ater 1 1 pany, has been to hit the questioner in the lark. 

II has been demonstrated that for several years Mr. Heney, the 
great apostle of obedience to the law and the avenger of its vio- 
lations, was engaged in the illegal but lucrative traffic of import- 
ing peon labor for the use of the most despised of all Mr. Henej '- 
corporation enemies. It has been demonstrated that Mr. Henej 
set a red this contract by reason of the "pull" he enjoyed at Wash- 
ington, a "pull" so peculiar and yet so potent that it enabled 
him to transgress regulations of the Federal Government— and 
to his own great personal profit. Mr. Heney's sole response to 
the inquiry into his activities as a padrone has been to remark 
that his contract with the Southern Pacific Railway was revoked 
the day before the Court of Appeals rendered its decision in the 
Schmitz case. How this suggested coincidence condones the 
Heney industry in peon labor, Mr. Heney himself does not ex- 
plain. It has been insisted that Mr. Heney should approach the 
prosecution of other malefactors with his own hands clean. Ap- 
parently it is entirely beyond Mr. Heney's power to wash his Ofl D 
hands. The stains are indelible. 



August 8, 1908. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



3 



General "Jim." All the Americans in the Philip- 

pines call liim "General .1 im." He 
has made himself very popular nut there with all classes, par- 
ticularly with the Americans. There are qo official frills about 
Governor-General James F. Smith, erstwhile San Francisco law- 
yer and politician, Colonel of the First California Volunteers, 
Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Associate Justice of the Su- 
preme Court of our insular possessions, and member of the 
Philippine Commission, with the portfolio of Secretary of Pub- 
lic Instruction. 

Genera] Jim's career, as the foregoing demonstrates, has been 
meteoric enough to suit almost any ambition. And the best part 
of ii is. he lias made good in everything he has undertaken since 
he led the gallant Californians. 



General Jim has the glad-hand ex- 
Bxiles of the Fab East, tended for everybody who comes to 

him, especially for Californians. 
The Golden West is strongly represented in the Philippine 
Islands. Native Sons are almost as numerous over there as they 
were in the Yoscmite Valley a few weeks ago. Every other 
American you meet speaks familiarly of "the city," Stockton, Los 
Angeles, Sacramento or other of our principal cities, while all 
have more than a bowing acquaintance with Golden Gate Park, 
Chinatown and the not to be omitted Barbary Coast; excepting 
General Jim, who, probably, would look at you mystified if you 
mentioned "Barbary Coast." If bis private conduct in the Phil- 
ippines is any criterion, while the others were perambulating 
along the "sight-seeing" routes. General Jim was attending de- 
votedly to his duties. 



'aft's FltlEND. 



General Smith is as popular at 
Washington as he is in the Philip- 
pines. Secretary Taft thinks so 
highly of him as an executive that be stated in public during his 
last visit to the islands that the Washington Government did not 
intend to relieve him in the Philippines until "it got good and 
ready," and thai that lime was somewhere in the dim and dis- 
tant future. It is known by General .lim's closest friends out 
there thai he wauls to gel back home. However, be is not inclined 
to force the issue, because when the time docs come for him to 
return, lie expects to find a good soft seal on the Federal Bench 
wailing for him. This, it is understood, has been promised to 

him as a reward for his services out there, anil in compliance 
with liis own expressed wishes on the subject. 



Heney AND the 
Exam iner. 



"What's all that hullaballoo out 
there on my earth?" shouted Lord 

Satan in a voice that shook hell 
from ils gale to the nethermost pit. 
"It's nothing, your majesty; nothing but noise." Prince Beelzc- 
luih growled, as he gave an extra prod with bis pitchfork to keep 
a bunch of Roman imperial assassins from crawling over the rim 

of the brimstone vat. "1 know il's only noise." Satan yelled an- 
grily; "did you imagine, you insolent fiend, thai 1 thought the 

rumpus was a debate over a point of order in a Methodist mis- 
sionary convention? Answer me properly, oi' I'll assign you to 

the Independence League Department of this inferno." "Your 
majesty, pardon me." the Send responded contritely. "I'm sorry 
1 offended your devilshin. but I didn't think yon wauled to be 
bothered. The row outside is another - rap between Heney and 
the Examiner. Henej says " "Never mind what Heney says," 
the Devil interrupted impatiently; "ami to hell with the Ex- 
aminer. Lei Moloch stir those Roman cut-throats, while you 
go Mm there and silence those blithering bla 

llene\ thai if he'll keep his tongue still, and quit disturbing my 
peace, be can havi to pull as Ion- 

tell the Examiner that Hearst may bring his entire political out- 
fit to bell with him, inch «ne, Ore -. B sgen and 
Bhearn; anything for a peaceful life in Tartarus." Which ac- 
counts for the temporary lull in certain -tdities 
that have distracted this community during the past three weeks. 



It lias been "resolved" by an 
v wi> nil- Press, gation o ■ iceable p 

the task has devolved upon them 
to "purify the press." B a mplexion in 

every race, clime and age, and these bigots are no different from 



those thai "purified" Spi I "heresy" under the 

forms" of the [nquisition,, and those thai "purified" 

of Christ :i s preached by dissenters in England when Bloody 

Win was on the throne. Our local "purifiers" of the press can- 
not thumb-screw or rack the editors, and they cannot send the 

publishers of the newspapers to the slake: they have determined, 
therefore, on the milder, if more cowardly "discipline" of the 

boycott. Every newspaper that does nol approve of Spreckels, 
Heney ami the graft prosecution is to be "black-listed" by the 

hypocrites .and pharisees — banished from Koine, like Cafalino; 
east into outer darkness like the daughter of the Chaldeans, to 
Hi silent and no more be called (lie lady of the kingdoms. I 
think 1 see this "'purification" of the press in process, like an 
antiseptic on a raw sore, and it is easy to imagine what the press 
will be after these snuffling nincompoops have experimented with 
the saponacity of their own detergency. If the press is not "puri- 
fied" into a condition as pulchritudinous as that in which the 
sanctified Pecksniffs move and have their being, I will draw my 
personal check for $30,000, and present to Mr. Heney as alms 
for his favorite synagogue. 



Tim Won i,n 
a nii Politics 



It is a fallacy, historical, philosophi- 
cal and popular, that the world is 
governed by politics. The world is 
not ruled by politics, but by the poli- 
ticians. This is so obvious that I am surprised when I hear 
learned and presumably intelligent statesmen proclaiming the 
contrary doctrine from a thousand stumps; namely, that the 
politicians are controlled by the politics of the masses. Polities 
may be segregated into three classes: scientific, artistic and com- 
mercial. Politics was a science down to and including the age 
of Machiavelli; it was an art until the principles of democracy 
were established; since that time the policies of nations have been 
determined by commercial expediency and the purchasing power 
of the dollar or its equivalent in those countries where the voice 
of the people is the voice of God. The first politician was his 
majesty the Serpent, and it is a political paradox that bis first 
constituent was a woman. Since that convention, States have 
been sent, to the devil by women politicians, but the jealousy or 
contempt of men politicians, has, in the majority of instances, 
prevented women from exercising her full power for evil in the 
politics of Governments. In the hands of men entirely great, 
the politics of a nation is about all there is of the nation; in- 
ferior politicians invent inferior politics, and the consequences 
are usually disastrous to the nation. 



The Big Man with 

a Small \ \ a E. 



If William Howard Taft is elected 
President of the United States, he 
will be the biggest man with the 
smallest name in the list of Presi- 
dents. He weighs 350 pounds, and his family nai lontains 

four letters. There were four letters in the name of .lames K. 
Polk, but none of them was repeated. There is a superfluous 
"t" in the name of Mr. Taft. Anagrammatically, there are two 

words in the name of "Ta ft"— "a ft" and "fat." Bryan's name 
contains five letters, two distinct Irish names and two significant 

wonts. The five-lettered Presidents were John idams, John 

Quincy Adams. John Tyler ami Dlysses S. Grant. The anagram 
of Bryan's name comprises two word-: "Wan" and "by." It is 

also worth] of record thai Mr. Bryan's full name contains twenty 
letters, a complement onlj equal the Presidents by Wm. 

Henry Harrison. II is notable that Mr. Hearst's candidate His- 
gen, and the candidate of tbe Populist party. Thomas \\ 
are both six-lettered "possibilities," as were .tames Monroe. 

Zachary Taylor, Franklin Pierce and Chester A. Arthur. Mr. 
Hisgen is peculiar in that he is the first instance of a candidate 
with a name of doubtful pronunciation. Even the hundred 
thousand citizens who intend to vote for him don't know whether 
the "g" in his name is "hard." "soft" or "silent." and p 

.ill never know, unless Mr. Hearst, through his multitude 

of new- to enlighten them. There's nothing in a 

name, and even Mr. Bryan has frequently failed to "conjure" 

with his: he would probably fail as utterly as if be were a Monfc- 

v or a Fitzbcrbert St. Clair. It's not the name that wins 

ins; it's the votes. Twenty years hence. •■Old Subscriber" 

['olitieiis" will write to their favorite newspapers inquiring 

"who were the unsuccessful candidates in the Presidential 

of 1908?" For such is fame. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 8, 1908. 



Weak SPOTS IN 
Bhyan's Candidacy. 



From no point of view docs the out- 
look for a Bryan victory next No- 
vember give him encouragement. In 
the first place, both he and Kern 
enter the campaign with a long record of defeats to their debit. 
In 1890 Bryan was elected to Congress by a rousing majority, 
but in 1892 he was returned by a majority of less than 150, 
which, under the circumstances, was worse than a defeat for 
the Democrats of Nebraska have never since that election been 
able to overcome the Republican party, except on a few occa- 
sions when they affiliated with the Populists, and even then it 
was Populist rather than Democratic victories. Mr. Kern has 
tried many times to persuade the voters of Indiana to give him 
a public office, other than Supreme Court reporter, and bis 
party has nominated him many times, but in every instance his 
own party defeated him. Thus Mr. Bryan's record of defeats in- 
cludes two efforts to be elected President and practically one Eor 
Congress, and a dozen other defeats in bis own State, and the 
record of bis running mate is one long string of nominations by 
bis party and as many defeats by those who gave him nomina- 
tions. A General whose military record is made up of defeats 
is discredited by his own, as well as by his enemy's country. The 
same is true of the ever-losing candidate for a public office. Che 
people of this country are never slow to repudiate the ".-late- 
man" who presumes to regard himself as absolutely necessary to 
their political salvation, and as such both Mr. Bryan and Mr. 
Kern have been posing for more than twenty years. This is one 
of the reasons why Mr. Bryan is a weaker candidate before the 
electors of the country than he was in 1896 and in 1900. 'Pin- 
people arc weary of the old pessimistic song of the Nebraskan 
chronic White House chaser. 

But that is not the only source of antagonism that has been and 
is still developing to Mr. Bryan. "Tom" Watson notifies Mr. 
Bryan that the more than 1,500,000 Populist votes that stood by 
him in 1896 and in 1900 will rally around their own colors this 
Presidential year. Watson says Bryan has changed his position 
on the issues for which Populism stands, and that the Middle-of- 
the-Road Populist, more especially, has lost confidence in his 
stability of character. They think it is the office, rather than the 
farmer, that most interests Bryan. If Watson is only half right, 
that half alone will make a Bryan victory impossible, for it 
would take the entire Populist vote to make good the loss to 
him in votes of Democrats who have persistently refused to give 
him aid and comfort ever since he and his Populist following 
raptured the Chicago Convention in 1896. Another weakening 
factor in Bryan's campaign is the advocacy of his election by 
Samuel Gompers. Gompers made the mistake of indorsing 
Bryan's candidacy in his capacity of President of the American 
Federation of Labor, which is composed of all kinds of Labor 
unions, and which aggregate more than 2,(100.000 members. The 
rank and file of the Federation are resenting Gomper's instruc- 
tions to vote for Bryan; this, together with the fact that for 
half a century the labor vote, or nearly the whole of it. has stood 
firmly for protective tariffs against, the pauper-made goods and 
wares of foreign countries, and the further fact that the position 
of Bryan on the tariff question is not very clearly revealed in 
the Denver platform, would seem to justify the belief that the 
labor vote will not leave the old path to make a cabinet position 
possible for Mr. Compos. 

It would be hard to tell at this time what the repudiation of 
Bryan and his party by the Independent party will amount to, 

hut it is safe to say that it will not do him any a 1. But the 

most significant "signs of the times" as to his weakness in this 
campaign comes from Bryan himself. He says he will make 
Ohio, Indiana. Illinois. Wisconsin and Minnesota his battle 
ground — the "Middle West," as he puis it. He figures that he 
can lose all east of Ohio md win out. supposing, of course, thai 
the "solid South*' will give him its entire electoral vote, Mil 
one need not be over well posted to know that Delaware, West 
Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia and Maryland, if not 
Missouri, too. are as likely to go against as I'm- Bryan. But as to 
Mr. Bryan's chosen battle-ground : Not one of his "Middle \\ est" 
States has returned a Democratic electoral vote in a dozen years 
in a national election. If the vote of 1900 is taken as a basis. 
and 1896 was substantially the same, it will be found that Mc- 
Kinley's plurality was nearly 400,000 in the live States that 
Mr. Bryan proposes to do or die in. 1 1' Bryan and Kern can turn 
this tremendous odds of 1900 against the opposition in these live 
States, and can recapture the Populist votes, and Mr. Gompers 



can deliver the labor union vole, and the "solid South" remains 
joined to its Democratic idols and ideals. Bryan's chances to 
spend the next four years in the White House will be first class, 
but otherwise not. 



The Mechanic's [flstitute has de- 
Tun New Mechanic's cided, in the face of a univer- 
Ixsrri'iTE BUILDING. sal demand for an architectural 
e petition, to ignore that de- 
mand, and has given the designing and superintending of its 
new building into the hands of Albert Pissis. This is no dis- 
paragement of Mr. Pissis's abilities, but it seem to me that there 

are a I iber of local architects who arc quite as capable as the 

gent leman selected to carry on the work. The point of the matter 
lies in the fact that the Mechanic's Institute is a quasi-public 
institution, and sine ii essentially holds for its objects the bet- 
terment and development of the arts and sciences, it is not in the 
position of the private builder. In the putting up of its new 
building